oldcar

1912 Humber

264 posts in this topic

Read through the thread and the work you are doing on Humber is incredible. It is truly a piece of history and I look forward to seeing your progress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎01‎/‎2017 at 2:00 PM, oldcar said:

My dear Kiwi friend

No doubt you are quite correct except that If you have visited Brooklands you would appreciate that it was a almost flat, almost oval track with steeply banked corners. The cars tended to run quite high final drive gearing and were "wound up" over a number of laps. My copy of W (Bill) Boddy's History of Brooklands manages to convey the impression that cars may do anything up to a dozen "warm-up" laps before the timing official would drop his flag for the start of "Timed Laps". Having said that the Humber crankshaft was made of particularly high quality steel. Otherwise it would not have lasted for the past one hundred and five years and once the engine is re-assembled hopefully will last many more.

In all probability considerably longer than me.  

Finally how many of todays little wiz-bang cars would be capable of withstanding hours of absolutely flat out running.

 

If you are a connoisseur fine engineering and remarkable crankshafts may I suggest that you have a quick look at my "thread' Under British cars/ Lagonda Rapiers?#192 on this forum

Bj

Only just come back to this thread for a look. Yes I have been to Brooklands (on a cold, wet, windy day in February 2014) and I am well aware of what it was like. I am no engineer but I do know that accurate machining and clearances, along with good quality materials are important, but also with the right oil and running at the right temperature things will generally last well. One reason why modern cars will go forever with regular and frequent oil changes and not much else. There was a time, even I can remember, when 100,000 miles was considered a good life for an engine. I think gravel roads and poor air filtering did for many engines.  Nowadays they should go several times that. Our little Toyota six has done nearly 400,000 km and only had the clutch done a couple of years ago. Unfortunately what has worn is the ohc valve gear. One reason why it is apart and probably being replaced with another version of the same engine. We have had the car for too long to consider throwing it away. The kids grew up with it and now that they have the skills it is theirs fix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Hello Both

Unfortunately you will have to wait a little longer until I get back to work on the Humber I am still waiting for the pistons for the Lagonda in the interim I am doing some improvements to the inlet manifold, something that has been bugging me for years.

 

Bj                                                                                                                                                               

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Hello fellow British Car Enthusiasts

I asked for this thread be moved from "Our Cars and Restoration Projects" to here because I felt that the Humber would be more at home among the other British cars. I know that being an "Edwardian" it may still a seem little strange here among far more modern cars. It is a very challenging project and I hope that you enjoy following my trials and tribulations. Work on the Humber is a little slow right now until I manage to get the Lagonda Rapier back on the road.

 

Bernie j.                                                                                                                                                          15180

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome home!  Actually, both places are fine, but I will follow you no matter where you post.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, unimogjohn said:

Welcome home!  Actually, both places are fine, but I will follow you no matter where you post.

 

 Yep!  Just need to know where you are. 

 

  Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm here with you too, Bernie. :)

 

Looking forward to Humber updates once you get the Lagonda up and running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Wheel_of_life.jpg.42a21b1eaa16a4b020b9db101267fcdc.jpgimages.jpeg.da9a1010144d2a662fa4296901738492.jpeg

Thank you both Ben and Paul,

I appreciate your interest and confidence in my ability. The Lagonda is coming closer with the motor ready to assemble this coming week.

One aspect of the Humber I would be grateful for any assistance is delving into the Humber Company history, From 1886 Humber used the Wheel of Life motif as their "trade mark", first as Transfers on the bicycle frames then on the chain-wheels of his bicycles and finally on the hub caps of the cars. There are several forms of the "Wheel of Life' some dating from very early England (around 450-550A.D.) and early Buddhism. But I have yet to see the Humber version used anywhere else. One clue is that prior to becoming a bicycle and then a car manufacturer, Humber was a Blacksmith, at least one reference to the Wheel of Life mentions "Hell". Some historians compare Black-smithing to Hell. An extremely hot work enviroment,with roaring fires, glowing metal and the loud noise of beating metal with hammers. In the past I have seen "blacksmithing" refered to as "The Black Art". There are said to be NINE different versions of the Wheel of Life. I have yet to see the Humber version anywhere else. Any suggestions?

 

Bj.

DSCN5369.thumb.jpg.af5e7cba41613781a5e9d347fcb2f2de.jpg

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps there are some Anglophiles out there who are wrapped up in the history of the Midlands who can assist. I have sent a whole rash of emails out to UK based History Societies etc without any success.

 

Bj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure exactly what Peter and his team have been doing But I am sure that it will be of some benefit to us all.

 

Well done Peter G and co and thank you all for ALL your behind the scenes activities. Where would we be without the AACA Forums!

 

Bernie j.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While there is still very little to report on the Humber progress, work on the Lagonda Rapier is progressing albeit slowly.

 

Bernie j.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bernie,

RE the Humber crankshaft - does it have oil drillings to feed the 2 and 3 big ends? Or is it splash lubed? Just curious.

 

Thanks

john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Hello John

Quite remarkably for 1912. The crankshaft is drilled and lubrication is full pressure to mains and bigends.

I have started to put the motor back into the Lagonda this afternoon so I should be back working on the Humber again very soon.

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now