Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Any suggestion that the Humber project is dead; is simply wrong.

This afternoon I made the long drive to collect the Humber foot (transmission) brake shoes from being relined. We are lucky in Melbourne, where we live in south eastern Australia, that we still have one brake specialist firm who is prepared to go that little extra way to meet their clients requirements. When I took the pair of shoes to be relined I was prepared to accept heat bonded linings rather than brass rivets. I could still put some rivets into the shoes if I felt sufficiently strongly about it. What I  am delighted with is the super, very edwardian, woven lining material that has been supplied. I know that it sounds silly and that once installed no one will ever see them but I have the satisfaction of knowing that they are within the correct period for the car.

DSCN5300.jpg

DSCN5299.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I cannot assemble the transmission (Foot) brake until I resolve what I am going to do about the drive shaft. If I have to go down the Hardy-Spicer path I have some machining to do (have done) on the centre of the drum. This must be resolved before I assemble it. 

 

Bj

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The Summer has returned to Melbourne Australia with todays temperature said to be in the mid to high 30s centigrade.

While I am not actually working on the Humber I have been amausing myself doing some reading.

I can now tell you that in 1912 W Tuck driving his then new Humber 11HP reclaimed the Brooklands (England) track records for the 50 and 100 mile and the one hour. His speed; 75.78 mph. His Humber would have had a crankshaft just like this one.

 

 

Bj. 

DSCN5245.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, oldcar said:

The Summer has returned to Melbourne Australia with todays temperature said to be in the mid to high 30s centigrade.

While I am not actually working on the Humber I have been amausing myself doing some reading.

I can now tell you that in 1912 W Tuck driving his then new Humber 11HP reclaimed the Brooklands (England) track records for the 50 and 100 mile and the one hour. His speed; 75.78 mph. His Humber would have had a crankshaft just like this one.

 

 

Bj. 

DSCN5245.jpg

Reminds me of the old saying; 'what the eye doesn't see the heart doesn't grieve over'.  Or maybe 'ignorance is bliss'?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My dear Kiwi friend

No doubt you are quite correct except that If you have visited Brooklands you would appreciate that it was a almost flat, almost oval track with steeply banked corners. The cars tended to run quite high final drive gearing and were "wound up" over a number of laps. My copy of W (Bill) Boddy's History of Brooklands manages to convey the impression that cars may do anything up to a dozen "warm-up" laps before the timing official would drop his flag for the start of "Timed Laps". Having said that the Humber crankshaft was made of particularly high quality steel. Otherwise it would not have lasted for the past one hundred and five years and once the engine is re-assembled hopefully will last many more.

In all probability considerably longer than me.  

Finally how many of todays little wiz-bang cars would be capable of withstanding hours of absolutely flat out running.

 

If you are a connoisseur fine engineering and remarkable crankshafts may I suggest that you have a quick look at my "thread' Under British cars/ Lagonda Rapiers?#192 on this forum

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I am still waiting for either the new pistons for the Lagonda, or some action on the Humber engine, despite everything else, many firms take their Annual Holidays (3 weeks) in conjunction with the Christmas/New Year Holidays (10 days). Now it seems that with the number of Asians making their home in Australia, we will soon have another holiday for "Chinese New Year". We are told this coming year is the year of the Rooster.

Australian businesses have to cope with more gazetted "Public Holidays" than anywhere else in the world. Added to this many "workers" have a long  (3 day) weekend every month just because they can. It is called a RDO, the "Rostered Day Off!"

Australia is the only country in the world where we have an Annual Holiday for a Horse Race. The first Tuesday in November is "Melbourne Cup Day". Because this is always a Tuesday it seems un-necessary to go to work on the preceeding Monday, making it into a four day weekend. Oh! I forgot about all the Muslim "Holy Days".  We are frequently told by Politicians, how wonderful it is that Australia is a "Multi-cultural Society".

Being retired, I work seven days most weeks, the others I try to work eight days......... Being over 80 years old I now have to work twice as hard as I may not have all that much time left!

 

Bj.

I should not complain I have a friend who has been waiting for over two years to get some tricky machining work done on a replacement oil pump for his Amilcar. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, oldcar said:

Australia is the only country in the world where we have an Annual Holiday for a Horse Race. The first Tuesday in November is "Melbourne Cup Day". Because this is always a Tuesday it seems un-necessary to go to work on the preceeding Monday, making it into a four day weekend.

 

I had to smile at this item. Here in Delaware, Ohio (USA) we have the annual Little Brown Jug Race which is one of the jewels in the triple crown of harness racing. Although not national, the whole area closes down (schools, some businesses, etc.) for race day which is on a Thursday making things susceptible for Friday closings as well. I used to kid my employer that we had to work on Good Friday but got a day off for a horse race! Looking forward to more Humber installments.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These things all have a priority, Once the Lagonda is all back together and going, I can go back to the Humber full time, meanwhile I am keeping an eye on the motor which is quietly making some (slow) progress in the background. I only have one pair of hands and room in my "garage" for one person to work. We all know who that one person is. 

 

Bj.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎01‎/‎2017 at 2:00 PM, oldcar said:

My dear Kiwi friend

No doubt you are quite correct except that If you have visited Brooklands you would appreciate that it was a almost flat, almost oval track with steeply banked corners. The cars tended to run quite high final drive gearing and were "wound up" over a number of laps. My copy of W (Bill) Boddy's History of Brooklands manages to convey the impression that cars may do anything up to a dozen "warm-up" laps before the timing official would drop his flag for the start of "Timed Laps". Having said that the Humber crankshaft was made of particularly high quality steel. Otherwise it would not have lasted for the past one hundred and five years and once the engine is re-assembled hopefully will last many more.

In all probability considerably longer than me.  

Finally how many of todays little wiz-bang cars would be capable of withstanding hours of absolutely flat out running.

 

If you are a connoisseur fine engineering and remarkable crankshafts may I suggest that you have a quick look at my "thread' Under British cars/ Lagonda Rapiers?#192 on this forum

Bj

Only just come back to this thread for a look. Yes I have been to Brooklands (on a cold, wet, windy day in February 2014) and I am well aware of what it was like. I am no engineer but I do know that accurate machining and clearances, along with good quality materials are important, but also with the right oil and running at the right temperature things will generally last well. One reason why modern cars will go forever with regular and frequent oil changes and not much else. There was a time, even I can remember, when 100,000 miles was considered a good life for an engine. I think gravel roads and poor air filtering did for many engines.  Nowadays they should go several times that. Our little Toyota six has done nearly 400,000 km and only had the clutch done a couple of years ago. Unfortunately what has worn is the ohc valve gear. One reason why it is apart and probably being replaced with another version of the same engine. We have had the car for too long to consider throwing it away. The kids grew up with it and now that they have the skills it is theirs fix.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Both

Unfortunately you will have to wait a little longer until I get back to work on the Humber I am still waiting for the pistons for the Lagonda in the interim I am doing some improvements to the inlet manifold, something that has been bugging me for years.

 

Bj                                                                                                                                                               

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Hello fellow British Car Enthusiasts

I asked for this thread be moved from "Our Cars and Restoration Projects" to here because I felt that the Humber would be more at home among the other British cars. I know that being an "Edwardian" it may still a seem little strange here among far more modern cars. It is a very challenging project and I hope that you enjoy following my trials and tribulations. Work on the Humber is a little slow right now until I manage to get the Lagonda Rapier back on the road.

 

Bernie j.                                                                                                                                                          15180

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wheel_of_life.jpg.42a21b1eaa16a4b020b9db101267fcdc.jpgimages.jpeg.da9a1010144d2a662fa4296901738492.jpeg

Thank you both Ben and Paul,

I appreciate your interest and confidence in my ability. The Lagonda is coming closer with the motor ready to assemble this coming week.

One aspect of the Humber I would be grateful for any assistance is delving into the Humber Company history, From 1886 Humber used the Wheel of Life motif as their "trade mark", first as Transfers on the bicycle frames then on the chain-wheels of his bicycles and finally on the hub caps of the cars. There are several forms of the "Wheel of Life' some dating from very early England (around 450-550A.D.) and early Buddhism. But I have yet to see the Humber version used anywhere else. One clue is that prior to becoming a bicycle and then a car manufacturer, Humber was a Blacksmith, at least one reference to the Wheel of Life mentions "Hell". Some historians compare Black-smithing to Hell. An extremely hot work enviroment,with roaring fires, glowing metal and the loud noise of beating metal with hammers. In the past I have seen "blacksmithing" refered to as "The Black Art". There are said to be NINE different versions of the Wheel of Life. I have yet to see the Humber version anywhere else. Any suggestions?

 

Bj.

DSCN5369.thumb.jpg.af5e7cba41613781a5e9d347fcb2f2de.jpg

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps there are some Anglophiles out there who are wrapped up in the history of the Midlands who can assist. I have sent a whole rash of emails out to UK based History Societies etc without any success.

 

Bj

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure exactly what Peter and his team have been doing But I am sure that it will be of some benefit to us all.

 

Well done Peter G and co and thank you all for ALL your behind the scenes activities. Where would we be without the AACA Forums!

 

Bernie j.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello John

Quite remarkably for 1912. The crankshaft is drilled and lubrication is full pressure to mains and bigends.

I have started to put the motor back into the Lagonda this afternoon so I should be back working on the Humber again very soon.

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Hey! It is now more than a month since I posted the photographs of the Humber "Wheel of Life" and not one person has suggested an answer to my question. Have you all been so bored that you have gone to sleep.

 

Bj.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

 It must be something to do with my advanced/advancing age. After almost five months of working and worrying on a daily basis over the extremely taxing rebuild of my Lagonda Rapier's engine I find I have little appetite to start working again on the HUMBER. I have now decided to offer it For Sale. 

I should not need to tell you that this is an extremely rare opportunity to obtain a Brass Era car that is almost complete albeit totally dismantled. To learn more send me a PM or email me direct <twooldlags@gmail.com>

 

Bernie j.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello OnSafari

Please don't become too agitated, I don't expect to sell the Humber over night, that said, I really cannot see myself just walking away and leaving it as virtually all the previous owners over the past 60 years have. Once I have finished two or three more necessary jobs on the Lagonda, if the Humber is unsold, it will not be simply left to gather dust.

I may have to adjust my  plans for it slightly. Don't go away.

 

Bernie j.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is with mixed feelings that I have to tell you that the 1912 Humber has been sold and will be making its way back to the place of its birth, England. I now realise that I would never have been able to finish the restoration. If I am to take on another restoration project it will have to be a smaller and more complete car. Meanwhile I still have some "sorting" to do on the Lagonda Rapier.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Good Thing is that The Humber is going back to the UK and to an Enthusiast who will complete the restoration. I am sure that my friends at the Humber Register will give him all the support and assistance he needs. 

I was for once amazed just how quickly it sold, It was one of those occasions when all the boxes were ticked just at the right time.

 

I can now give all my attention to getting the Lagonda Rapier sorted out and running as it should.

 

A big Thank You to all my friends on the AACA Forum for all your interest and support.

 

Bernie Jacobson

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

With the Humber 75% packed and ready for shipment to the UK. There are four of these wire mesh crates of small parts, including a pile of body brackets and fittings all made in Humber's own Blacksmith shop. The question is should at my great age (80) should I be thinking about another perhaps simpler project? One thing for sure is that IF  there is to be another project It will almost certainly of British origin and definitely pre WW2.

I will not receive the final payment for the Humber until June 30 which gives me a little time to do some thinking and some research. I am reminded that I have to be careful not to get splinters in my fingers while scratching my head.

 

Bernie j.

 

DSCN5463.thumb.jpg.58a302ad30d32a94b79fe24f54224885.jpgDSCN5462.thumb.jpg.aac5e51df18aa175274bf9c228a496c6.jpg

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you both for your enthusiastic support. At present my first priority is to get all the Humber bits safely packed up for their long sea voyage. I have made some enquiries about a couple of cars, one is in a deceased estate and has been garaged for over 30 years, It is a bit scruffy and has some rust. The other the same old established British brand is a little older The same age as the Lagonda, 1934. This one is a four door Saloon, something I have never thought about before. It is a small 1.5 Litre six cylinder and as such extremely rare, just 17 known to have survived world wide. I am waiting on some photographs for both cars. Both are about 150kms away but in different directions. Both cars have their original bodies in relatively good condition. (Restorable). Perhaps at this time in my life a saloon is what I need.

 

Bernie j.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello OnSafari

No I must admit I have not even thought about a Wolseley Hornet (yet). Something will no doubt drop out of the wood-work but the owner of the car mentioned, a Morris 10/Six, has not even responded to my request for more detail and I am not going on a three hour drive without some idea of what I am going to look at.

 

Bj

Link to post
Share on other sites

Having spoken on the telephone to the owner of the Morris 10/Six and requested that he send me some more detail photographs I am still waiting, waiting and still waiting. In the meanwhile my better half has decided that I really do not need a four door saloon so he has probably been right in not bothering either himself or me.

It has been decided that what I really need is a Pre-1925 English or European, Light Car (under 1500cc) Possibly a mechanically complete rolling chassis, that I can build one of my staggered seat two seater sports/racing bodies on.

 

592a0fc5c66ab_BrooklandsSinger8hp022.jpg.957d878fb3ba5c690ca592224a887146.jpg

 

Body_2.thumb.JPG.faf62a0bc3b2446ddd79cc7f1ea07d33.JPGBody_3.JPG.6c3544701534b6ec6c4accd6d819ab8f.JPG592a0f8136bed_BrooklandsSinger8hp021.thumb.jpg.7b6cdc34adfcae89d07e2f618533b937.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...