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Thanks Moe,

I just wish it was that easy. I have advertised in a number of places:-Wanted to Buy Used 810 X 90 Beaded edge (Clincher) Tires suitable to stand resto project on and have yet to receive any answers. I do not want to buy new tires as yet as it will be some time before the car will be ready to roll.

There are quite a number of things I will need before tires and they will be a major investment. I have seen a lot of people buy tires before they were ready to use them, only to find by the time to fit them came, they had become so hard that they were useless.

If it will make you feel any better I can simply take off the wheels and put the car back on jack stands.

You seem to have missed the whole point, This the first time in 50-60 YEARS since the chassis stood on its wheels. If you missed them before the photographs below shows how the car was when I bought it. It had been taken apart in the 1960s, very possibly before you were born

 

Bj

IMG_2281.JPG  from John Harvey..JPG

IMG_2282.JPG from John Harvey..JPG

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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I was kidding mate about the bike shop, seeing how the Humber wheels look so much like a bike wheel.

However, giving it another thought, if you only want them for moving the chassis around the shed, it's not such a bad idea.

The right size bike tyre with a tube may just do the job at a reasonable cost.

 

The colour you have chosen is very similar to my 28 Chrysler colour.

 

I am sure you have a huge smile on your face from getting this amazing project to this stage. You will definitely be getting toey as you progress along because it will look so much like a real car from now on. I admire your skills, determination, and enthusiasm.

 

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Hello Moe

I have sent you a pm.Good idea but I doubt that there are any bicycle tyres that would stretch over a 32 in (810mm) wheel.

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Bernie

You could cut some plywood sheets into big discs the same diameter as your wheels with tires, spigot hole and bolt holes to fit your hubs. Should be strong enough to roll the Humber around your shop and you won't have to worry about messing them up or your wire rims.

 

Jim 

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Thank you Jim

That is a very good Idea I will have to think about it. Once I install the engine into the chassis It can go back onto jack stands for a while. If I can get rid of those wire crates I will have some more room to move around the car.

 

Bj.

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I have now temporarily fitted the gearbox in the chassis. With it bolted down it is easier than chasing it around the floor, It takes up too much space and tends to slide around on my work bench. I would hate to have it fall off (the bench) and I can take the parts that have to be cleaned & painted while it is in place. 

 

Bj

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Looking a lot like a car now. :)  Very smart idea to bolt those things on the frame. One of my biggest fears is knocking one the the irreplaceable castings off my workbench and I've come pretty close to it a couple of times.  

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Hello Jeff

One of the problems I have is that I am working in a confined space and try as I might I never seem to have enough places to store "stuff" added to that I am probably reluctant to throw things away. All too often I need something that I have consigned to the bin the day before. My other problem with the Humber is that very often I am not sure what I am looking for until after I have found it!Todays Problem is typical, At some time in the future I will need the other half of the magneto drive. I am familiar with the typical Simm's Vernier coupling but in 60 years of playing with old cars I have not previously come across one like this, I need the female half to mount onto the magneto (when I get one). The correct magneto for the Humber is an early (1912) Eisemann. Has anyone got either a coupling or an early Eisemann 4 cylinder magneto?.

 

Bernie j.

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For all those wondering about the magneto coupling

Peter Wilcox of the Humber Register in the UK has sent me the following photographs. If you look closely the teeth in the two offset rows in the outer band are staggered to allow for very fine timing adjustment. Once the timing is set the band is locked in place by tightening the screw.

All I need to do now is to find an outer band and the Mag gear. If you have one lying in a container with other odd bits & pieces; Please let me know. If it is already attached to an early Eisemann 4 cylinder Magneto  even better.No matter where you live, I can send a courier to your doorstep to collect it, so you don't even have worry about taking it to the Post-office. How easy is that? I can pay you "PayPal" or even send cash.  

 

Bernie j

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I have just taken a few days away from the Humber to do a service on the 1934 Lagonda Rapier. new spark plugs, distributor points and condenser. We are taking a few days to attend a Rally in north central New South Wales (Australia) with a stop-over at Dubbo. I estimate that we will drive (in the Rapier) approximately 2,000 to 2,500 miles by the time we arrive home again in 2 weeks time. We leave on next Tuesday a.m. Today the postman very kindly brought a parcel from Classic Fasteners in South Australia with 2 dozen 5/16 BSF set screws 1.5inches long. These are to secure the clutch cover some time soon. 
Going back to that service on the Lagonda, I opted to go one number hotter for the spark plugs as it will still be chilly in the mornings. Straight away it is starting from cold better and without wetting the plugs or misbehaving. For the benefit of anyone who understands these things, I have gone from NGK BP8ES to BP7ES. These are still a comparatively "cold" plug. With both Bosch & Champion the spark plugs become hotter as the numbers go up while with NGK they go the other way.

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Back on the Humber front as soon as we return from the Geo Green Rally  I have to sort out the inverted tooth timing chain and the right hand rear hub, then I can move onto the next item on the agenda. The problem right now is that I do not know what it will be but I am sure that it will not be too long before it becomes apparent. These things have a habit of falling into line.

 

Bj.

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Before we dash off on our interstate journey in the Lagonda Rapier I felt that what better way to spend a very windy Sunday afternoon than taking the Humber apart  some more. I have ben unhappy about the "tight spot' when attempting to turn the engine over by rotating the flywheel. While I still have not completely discovered the reason I am getting closer. I have now removed the sump and I have discovered some worrying things although hopefully I can now rectify them. The first is the obsession that some people have with black silicone gasket "stuff". Used in moderation if is probably ok as a short term fix BUT there is no need to use the whole tube on the one job. Too much and it squashed out to form a bead alonside the joint. If this is on the outside it can be cleaned off but when it squishes out on the inside of an engine the betting is that eventually it will come loose to form a long evil looking black catapiller which will float about in the insides of the engine or what ever, eventually it will find its way into an oilway and then in time block it, usually with disasterous results. 

 

The next thing that came to my attention is that who ever put the engine together needs a good spanking.

Oh goody! he put in some new big end bolts!  The problem is that they were too long so he filled the space with a nice thick spring spring washer which allowed him to tighten up the nut the only problem being was that the hole drilled for a split pin was a couple of threads below the castleations in the nut. "Ho Well!" he thought, "I will do the right thing and put in a split pin". The only problem is that it that where it is it is absolutely useless! What all this is telling me, is that whether I wanted to or not, when we return home I am going to totally strip the engine and then having rectified the problems I can start to very carefully re-assemble it. It is a good thing that I have absolutely no mechanical qualifications!  I cannot charge myself the $100-150 per hour that the professionals ask. Then again there is no way I would ever dream of doing work like what has been done on the Humber before I bought it. No wonder the person I bought it from gave up, "Because the small amount of work he had done had cost him so much!"  Oh yes! the engine had been very nicely washed off on the outside, I won't bore you with the details of what it was like inside.

 

Bernie j.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I seriously doubt that most people can tell the difference between schlock work and good work... If one of the previous owners paid someone to rebuild it, then he probably thought it was rebuilt. If they did it themselves, they just didn't know what they were doing. I've seen some VERY bad work done on a brass-era engine by a man who had been in the engine rebuilding business for 50 years and enjoyed an excellent reputation... it was the only job like that I ever sent out and determined that I'd have to learn how to do it myself.

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Hello JV

The further I look the worst it gets, I am starting to wonder if the same person did the "very expensive rebuild" on the rear axle too. I can see that ultimately I will look at everything just to be sure. 

 

Bj

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They obviously used the ' She'll be right mate!' technique.

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Hello Moak

Somehow I don't think that they even got that far, It is more like "rough enough is good enough" or "'ll be orite on the die, mite!" 

 

Bj

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What I ran into was "It's only going to be carried around on a trailer."

I'm not saying anything in defense of such work... It annoys me so much that I've accumulated my own machine shop and taught myself how to do things right. But, sadly, the attitude that things need to be put right – and the knowledge as to what is right, is rare. I'm afraid it's rare for many of the so-called professionals as well.

 

A doctor friend once made a comment to me that I think may apply here... that "the average person has no way of assessing a doctor's qualifications so they presume that the most expensive must be the best." substitute "mechanic" for "doctor" and you've the root of much wretched work.

Edited by JV Puleo
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49 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

What I ran into was "It's only going to be carried around on a trailer."

I'm not saying anything in defense of such work... It annoys me so much that I've accumulated my own machine shop and taught myself how to do things right. But, sadly, the attitude that things need to be put right – and the knowledge as to what is right, is rare. I'm afraid it's rare for many of the so-called professionals as well.

 

A doctor friend once made a comment to me that I think may apply here... that "the average person has no way of assessing a doctor's qualifications so they presume that the most expensive must be the best." substitute "mechanic" for "doctor" and you've the root of much wretched work.

 

This is so true and the implications are as much scary as they are sad.

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Sorry to hear this Bernie. But you know that a lot of cars are restored as 'stationary works of art' that hardly ever run, much less get driven........so shady engine builders can take short cuts and usually not get caught. You on the other hand drive the heck out of your cars, which is GREAT!  I know you will fix it right, but I hate that you have to pay again for that. I admire your perseverance on things like this.

 

Once you get this car running and touring with it, hopefully the sting this issue will fade away somewhat.

 

Looking forward to updates on what it takes to get the engine right.

Edited by r1lark
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I synpathise Bernie, from a similar position. The 26 Rover was 80% rebuilt when I got it recently, with many receipts for work done. BUT all the mechanical work was done in the early 90s, and ALL of the businesses involved have now disappeared. Car came fully assembled, new woodwork and panels, basically needing wiring, interior and a hood. Receipts said starter, maggy and dynamo all rebuilt. How far do I go checking things if it requires extensive dismantling? 

So far I have got the engine running for short spells (carb full) and it sounds OK, oil pressure is very good (verified pressure before giving it spark), dynamo produces 10A. A little coolant weep on pump and one core plug.Apart from inspecting obvious stuff, all I can do is cross my fingers and wait for signs that things are not as they should be.

 

john P

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It is easier to damage things taking them apart than it is reassembling them and people who do a poor job with the reassembly virtually never do a good job with the dismantling. I tend to look for stressed parts... nuts with the corners banged, pieces that require a hook spanner that have been whacked with a chisel or screw driver... split pins missing or the wrong size. There are all sorts of clues but you have to be looking for them. This doesn't guarantee everything will be right but it does show that the obvious things aren't wrong. Were I to buy a car with a supposedly rebuilt engine that was not running or hadn't run, I'd remove the sump and take a look look inside before I did anything. Engines are far more likely to get abusive treatment than transmissions or rear ends but a look inside the top cover or taking the wheels off to see the ends of the axels is prudent, if not necessary. On my car, the rear wheel bearings are retained by large threaded collars and those were badly chewed up by being hit with a hammer and chisel by someone who didn't have the right tool. You can also look for washers & lock washers in place and tab washers that have been bent and re-bent into place. This is all part & parcel with brass cars and probably the case right up through the 20s. If they have survived, they did so for many years as worthless junk and it's unrealistic to expect they haven't seen a fair amount of abuse or that everyone who worked on them was knowledgable.

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Hi Bernie, haven't heard from you in a while. Just hoping that you are doing ok. We care about you!

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