Su8overdrive

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About Su8overdrive

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    Lifelong autoholic.
  1. All parts cherry-picked mainly from California 1946-47 Customs Supers in the early 1970s, stored indoors since. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Chrome bezel for instrument cluster and speedometer, excellent, includes ammeter and gas gauge but not temp & oil. Mint white lettering with brown background, all 1946-47. $145 Hood stainless side trim strips and barbs, 1942-47 seniors. Side strips are flawless, $75 each, part# 379040, left, #379041, right. Someone put a small screw through each barb, and the driver's side barb has two small holes where the brazed mounting bracket pulled loose, but some silver solder will save these, so $25 right, part# 379125, $20 left, # 379124, or $185 for the complete set. 1946-47 Custom Super interior windshield finish molding, gorgeous chrome, micro pits not worth replating. Part# 380314, $25 Interior rear ceiling dome light 1941-47, nice chrome has micro pitting not worth replating, few will notice or care. $25. Mint frosted glass. 1942 One-Eighty Clipper and 1946-47 Custom Super back of front seat cigar lighter bezel. Micro pits not worth replating. $20 1942-47 180 Clipper/Custom Super brushed aluminum with anodized gold inscribed PACKARD ashtray cover for back of front seat. Lovely. Missing handle but Y&Z and others may have this. $25. Front seat adjusting handle, escutcheon, lever & bracket assembly for all 1941-47 four doors, gorgeous chrome. $35 NOS Gates 665 fan belts for all 356 engines. Try to find these. $55. Can't upload crisp photos of the final three items below, but contact me and I'll email them to you directly. Horns, right (passenger side), 1941-47 Clippers, all. Have two, one for parts $20, the other excellent shape but missing only cover, $40. Disassembled 21st series senior speedometer/odometer, mint ivory/white lettering on brown background, perfect glass. $50 Front license plate bracket for 1941-47 Clippers. It's a gray area, legally, to drive a collector car without a front license plate in most states, tho' many of us do this. A local cop admitted he did this on his own old Corvette. Because I like the cleaner, lighter look of the prewar Clippers, i removed the heavy, bulky, clunky front license plate holder and front and rear bumper extensions from my '47 Super Clipper (a warmed over '42 One-Sixty Clipper as you know). But in case some busy body gendarme pulls you over for something else and notices your missing front license plate, now you can comply, at least long enough to have another patrolman sign off on it. $25 contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net horns right passenger side.htm speedo.htm
  2. 1941-47 Packard Clipper parts galore

    Complete instrument clusters w/ all gauges, brown background with nice white lettering, ammeter, part #387673, gas gauge, part #387671, temperature with sending tube and bulb, #387674,oil pressure,#387672. For all 1946-47 junior and senior, $230, less than trying to find them piecemeal. Chrome bezel for instrument cluster and speedometer, excellent, includes ammeter and gas gauge but not temp & oil. Mint white lettering with brown background, all 1946-47. $145 Cover, center panel, this is the big chromed die casting for center of dash for 1941-47, part# 371539, $225. Lovely, has map light assembly with push/pull knob. Hood stainless side trim strips and barbs, 1942-47 seniors. Side strips are flawless, $75 each, part# 379040, left, #379041, right. Someone put a small screw through each barb, and the driver's side barb has two small holes where the brazed mounting bracket pulled loose, but some silver solder will save these, so $25 right, part# 379125, $20 left, # 379124, or $185 for the complete set. 1946-47 Custom Super interior windshield finish molding, gorgeous chrome, micro pits not worth replating. Part# 380314, $25 Interior rear ceiling dome light 1941-47, nice chrome has micro pitting not worth replating, few will notice or care. $25. Mint frosted glass. 1942 One-Eighty Clipper and 1946-47 Custom Super back of front seat cigar lighter bezel. Micro pits not worth replating. $20 1942-47 180 Clipper/Custom Super brushed aluminum with anodized gold inscribed PACKARD ashtray cover for back of front seat. Lovely. Missing handle but Y&Z and others may have this. $25. Front seat adjusting handle, escutcheon, lever & bracket assembly for all 1941-47 four doors, gorgeous chrome. $35 Mint top left cat whisker for 1942-47 junior Clipper, part #378860. Try and find one. $55 Complete left junior tail light for 1946-47 without turn signal. Chrome shiny for driver, replate for show. The mint glass lens alone is worth the $45 I'm asking for the entire assembly. NOS Gates 665 fan belts for all 356 engines. Try to find these. $55. Horns, right (passenger side), 1941-47 Clippers, all. Have two, one for parts $20, the other excellent shape but missing only cover, $40. Disassembled 21st series senior speedometer/odometer, mint ivory/white lettering on brown background, perfect glass. $50 Front license plate bracket for 1941-47 Clippers. It's a gray area, legally, to drive a collector car without a front license plate in most states, tho' many of us do this, a local cop admitted he did this on his own old Corvette. Because I like the cleaner, lighter look of the prewar Clippers, i removed the heavy, bulky, clunky front license plate holder and front and rear bumper extensions from my '47 Super Clipper (a warmed over '42 One-Sixty Clipper as you know). But in case some busy body gendarme pulls you over for something else and notices your missing front license plate, now you can comply, at least long enough to have another patrolman sign off on it. $25 All my parts were cherry-picked mainly from California 1946-47 Customs Supers in the early 1970s, stored indoors since. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  3. Lovely chrome. Contains complete map light push/pull knob assembly. Packard part #371539. $230. Prompt insured shipping. If sharp photo won't open, just contact me and I'll email it to you: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  4. Complete left (driver's side) tail light assembly for any junior Clipper except 1946-47 Deluxe 8 (which has turn signals); includes housing for bulb, chrome bezel shiny, minor pitting. Ok for driver, or replate with no loss of detail. Mint glass lens alone worth the $50 I'm asking for the complete assembly.
  5. Complete instrument clusters for all 21st series Packards. Brown background with sharp, crisp white lettering in all four gauges; ammeter, Packard part # 387673 , gasoline gauge, #387671, oil pressure, #387672, temperature, #387674. Temp gauges have sending unit line with bulb. All parts cherry-picked from California Packards in early '70s, garaged since then. $240 for complete cluster a far better price than trying to find all four gauges separately. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  6. Complete instrument clusters with ammeter, gas, temperature and oil pressure for all 21st series Packards, junior and senior. Temp gauges have sending unit with bulb. $250 complete, less than trying to find all four gauges separately. Brown background with nice white lettering on all four gauges. All my parts are from California cars cherry-picked in the early '70s, stored indoors since.
  7. CCCA Future

    Might we tender an amazingly simple solution? The CCCA should have a cordial, polite form e-response to those wanting a post-1948 car considered referring them to the Milestone Car Society, the Antique Automobile Club of America, the Rolls-Royce Owners Club, the Bentley Drivers Club, the Contemporary Historical Vehicle Society, the Buick Club of America, the Packard Club, the Nash Club, the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, the Walter P. Chrysler Club, the Mercedes Club, the Sports Car Club of America, www.nationalwoodieclub.com, www.ferrariclubofamerica.org, www.barret-jackson.com, www.classicmotorcarauctions.com, www.kruseclassics.com (because it's really all about money and that now vaunted word, classic ) and the myriad existing clubs awaiting their cars with open arms. This most polite form letter can conclude with a long list of various car clubs' websites. However, as the CCCA already does, we remind these people in our most cordial form e- or slow mail reply that they are still welcome to join us even if they don't own a CCCA car if they've an interest in CCCA cars. That's the end of it. It really is. Now can we get back to discussing CCCA cars? Haven't seen a Jensen Model H saloon in a looooong time. And wasn't it astounding the quality you got in an Auburn Twelve, especially for the money?
  8. CCCA Future

    Amen, gentlemen. Truer words regarding the Classic Car Club of America's current dilution and resulting fade do not exist. Studepeople's comments, above, say it all.
  9. 1940 caddilac wiring poss or neg ground ???

    Packard, Hudson, Chrysler, Ford, Nash, Studebaker, everyone but GM in those years was positive ground. Far as i've seen, Cadillac was the exception at GM, being the only division in those years to be positive ground. Wonder what the thinking at GM's other negative-ground divisions was. Anyone have a sound engineering reason? Have often wondered.
  10. CCCA Judging

    Steve, don't ever let any Classic owners pooh pooh your One-Twenty. I had a '40 120 w/ overdrive and a '39 Packard accessory tach. No better road car from the era other than, possibly, a '40 160 on the same wheelbase, and that only for more top speed. As Edinmass knows, Pierce-Arrows are stupendous cars, and the final generation 1936-38 P-As, both 8s & 12s, came standard with Warner Gear R-1 overdrive, coincentric circles on the speedometer showing rpm in third gear direct and third gear overdrive. IMHO, the finest luxury road cars hands down from either side of the Atlantic were the Packard Twelve, Pierce-Arrow Twelve, and Marmon 16. Sadly, the Packard Twelve was never available with overdrive, and the tallest axle ratio was the seldom ordered 4:06:1, still trucky. Peter Hartmann, among others, has described the benefits of taller gearing for such cars. Often wondered what the proposed junior Pierce-Arrow "One-Twenty" would've been like. I know they got as far as looking into a deal with Hayes to use bodies a la the final Reo Flying Clouds. But i've never found anything that detailed any designs, proposals for the junior Pierce's drivetrain, which would've been terrific, i'm sure. Understand your agonizing decision 'twixt sports car and Full Classic. Been there. Personally, like vintage, Classic and sports cars best. Back to the judging issue, would love to see the CCCA, as the dean of clubs representing the finest cars of that golden era, set the standard for historical accuracy above all. I understand many owners want to feather their nests by overrestoring their Full Classics. And again, anyone's allowed to do whatever they wish with and to their Full Classics. We all know you could ask the dealer or some shop to do such and such to your Full Classic in the day, and that once in a blue moon, a lone Full Classic really was painted Look at Me Red (aka lipstick red, resale red) strictly for display by some distributor or new car show. But CCCA judging should be the ultimate, the final arbiter of historical accuracy, else we forever lose examples of how Full Classics really were. That, and CCCA judging rules are often followed at non-CCCA concourses throughout the nation, Canada. Finally, CCCA judging should NOT contribute to the current janitorial d'elegance mentality. The late Phil Hill, partner in a fine Classic restoration shop, said he'd "....seen more beautiful original cars forever ruined for the sake of a few more points at some concours." In the original European concourses, cars were judged on elegance of line alone, having been driven at speed to the event the day before, wheels, chassis reflecting use, albeit well maintained. These real concourses had nothing to do with janitorial overkill. This "show car" vs. "driver" nonsense is just that, and should have nothing to do with CCCA judging at a Grand Classic or anywhere. Human nature at places like Pebble Beach will always exist. Let it. We can't stop it. But if the CCCA is to retain respect, we should not remotely contribute to the idea of "show car" vs. "driver," nor overrestoration, just because some owners "like" shiny engine accessories, whitewalls, garish hues, and want to feather their nest, realize greater profit at the next "Classic Car Auction." If your Full Classic needs to be reduced to a hygiene project, and requires crayon color, gew gaws like whitewall tires, hood ornament, foglights it never had to attract attention, perhaps it's not innately elegant. Unless the CCCA stops this nonsense NOW, examples of authentic Full Classics will fade forever. Many people, especially younger or new members, don't see this as it's happening, tantamount to frogs boiled to death in an initially tepid pot of water. Let's see this addressed in 2012, not swept under the rug, shrugged off, "everyone does it," ad nauseum. CCCA= history or vanity du jour? Happy Third Day of Christmas, to a healthy, happy New Year.
  11. CCCA Judging

    I get your points about your now "antique" if not Classic Mopar, Trimacar, and agree. I had to upgrade such an era Mopar ragtop years ago. But these aren't usually concerns with CCCA full Classics, which are by their definition fine, well-engineered, quality, luxury, upscale barouches. Edinmass sounds mired in bureaucracy. I've had cars judged at nationally renowned concours d' elegances, by CCCA, Packard Club, SCCA regulations. But as this is a judging thread, i wanted to bring up these glaring exceptions to authenticity. If you want to start a new thread, fine, i bow to your bureaucratic procedures. Yet, again, sounds like more side-stepping, sputtering, buck-passing; anything to justify modern vanity over historic reality. Specifically, cars that were delivered with engine accessories in matte or semi-gloss (whatever term you prefer) black are today routinely showed at CCCA-judged events with gloss black and never penalized. This is, purely, simply, wrong. So are whitewalls on 1946 cars. Period. And no 1947 cars, regardless of price/make/model, were delivered with whitewalls, other than a very few during the last month or so of the '47 sales year. We note that when there's enough hyperactive aging boomer money behind something, as with allowing Chrysler Town & Country models into the CCCA, things happen. What about it, sportsfans? Is CCCA judging--not AACA or muscle car-- but CCCA judging always about authenticity, historical correctness, or vanity? Actions speak louder than words. When we see CCCA Full Classic cars with gloss black engine accessories and cars that were never delivered with whitewalls penalized accordingly at CCCA Grand Classics and the like, we'll have the above answer.
  12. CCCA Judging

    I get all your points above. And, believe me, as mentioned, i'm sympathetic with wanting to upgrade, gild the lily. But my question remains as unanswered now as it was the last time the issue of, for example, whitewalls came up. Obviously, we're not going to smear chassis black on our frames and call it a day. I painted my undercarriage with a quality protective paint. Yet obvious things like gloss black paint on engine accessories that were never delivered with other than semi-gloss are clear cut. And whitewalls on 1946 cars are wrong, wrong, wrong. 1947 cars need to be addressed as above. Simply: If you're going to have your car judged and have it mean something, the above have to be remedied. That "everyone does it" or "we like whitewalls" doesn't cut it. When you restore or otherwise present a car to be judged, even if it's otherwise faultless, if you sprayed matte or semi-gloss black engine accessories gloss, or installed whitewalls, you should be docked points accordingly. Period. Otherwise, judging is farce, a vanity exercise. Judging should be final arbiter, ensuring cars that are presented as CCCA Classics are faithful. If any part of them are unauthentic, they should be noted, and certainly not validated by receiving 100 points, etc. Until these flagrant instances of inauthenticity are no longer swept under the rug, justified by vanity or "we all do it," judging lacks credibility. Judging is where the buck stops. The final arbiter. I'd never tell anyone what they can or can't do with their car. But if that car is presented for judging, let's get real.
  13. CCCA Judging

    Why isn't there a point-deduction for gloss paint on engine accessories that were originally semi-gloss or matte black? How many 100- and high-point cars have we seen with gloss black engine accessories that never were. You can spin this, and sputter, but it's wrong. And, not to belabor this, by why isn't there a point deduction for whitewalls on 1946-47 cars? Other than a very few '47 models delivered during the last month or so of the model year, NO 1946-47 cars regardless price class were delivered with whitewalls. Magazine ads have no bearing on this. If you can prove your car was delivered at the tail end of the model year so equipped, okay. Everyone else, no. No one says you can't spray your air cleaner, generator, starter, etc. gloss black, or put whitewalls on your 1946-47 car. But right is right. Are historical accuracy, authenticity prerequisites for judging or not? You can't have it both ways just because you like something, or want to gild the lily. Until the above and other modern era owner vanities are addressed, judging is a joke. There's no such thing as accuracy, authenticity when it's convenient, or doesn't clash with current owner's taste. Either judging means something, or it doesn't. Which is it? I'm sympathetic with wanting to personalize our cars, or do certain things we might view as upgrades. I replaced a painted steel water distributing tube in my engine bay with a polished stainless steel one merely as i prefer it. But i'd never expect to have it okayed by a judge. But once and for all, let's decide if judging is always based on truth, or fancy. Until then, let's not kid ourselves.
  14. small pre-war Rolls Royces

    Anglesey clearly knows of what he speaks. I'd read in an auld English motoring magazine that when the "Small Horsepower" Rolls-Royce 20 junior car debuted in 1922, it "borrowed" much from the existing Buick Six, tho' in the words of one English road tester, was "....not so good." Another English source, perhaps Autocar magazine, said the R-R 20hp was the basis for the engines in all Rolls-Royce/R-R Bentley products except the Phantom I/II/III until R-R/Bentley introduced their V-8 in the fall of 1959. Maurice Hendry and others mention the R-R V-8's chief engineer, after a couple drinks at its press debut, blurting out, "It's bloody near as good as the Chrysler." Since Anglesey has an interesting stable, i'd be interested in his insights comparing/contrasting the small hp Rolls-Royce with the Buick 6, as he owns both. We know the Rolls-Royce is lovingly built--another English motoring journalist back in the early '50s, writing about Classic era R-Rs, described them as "....a triumph of craftsmanship over engineering." Each year during the late 1930s until the war in Europe broke out, Rolls-Royce disassembled a new Buick Limited for the latest production tips. Until the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud and concurrent Bentley S-Type were introduced autumn, 1955, R-R/Bentley copied the prewar Packard Saf-T-fleX independent front suspension nut for bolt. The Silver Cloud/S-Type went to a conventional i.f.s for the same reason as the 1941-47 Packard Clipper; the lowered floorpan left no reason for Saf-T-fleX's long torque arms. A fellow who rebuilds Merlins told me the ones built by R-R have nicer cosmetics, hand finishing, but the Merlins Packard produced were better engineered, and the ones Reno Air Racers and others want. But i always thought the Wraiths were, and are, lovely, agreeing with Scott about their more rational size, and the 200 or so similarly-engined 1938-39 Overdrive Bentley 4 1/4-liters sound nice, even tho' "overdrive" meant final gearing no taller than 3.65:1 or so. Often wonder what sort of Bentleys we'da seen had Napier outbid R-R in 1931. I like such Rolls-Royce/Bentleys for their charm and bespoke lines, even tho' another English auto journalist dismissed Rolls-Royce as "....a great confidence trick." They're lovely mobile furniture, at the very least. After viewing their well-enameled engines, i'm always inspired to carefully wipe down my Packard's engine with a kerosene-soaked rag even if it doesn't need it. Meanwhile, does anyone have any indepth info, detailed photos, maybe an engineering cross-section of the small hp-based Rolls-Royce B-80 346-ci F-head inline 8 introduced in 1950, used in the mere 18 Phantom IVs, as well as Dennis fire engines and military vehicles? Some of us with the inline 356-ci Super-8 Packard produced 1940-50 and Cadillac 346-ci V-8 through '48 would be interested. Thanks!
  15. The Alden Handy Classics photo collection

    T-Head-- Thanks for posting these charming photos from www.theoldmotor.com, a wonderful site where it's easy to while away much time. So many of these are the sort of cars that've been overshadowed in recent years, or worse-- overrestored in garish concours color. Love the description of the MIT prof's Phantom I snapped in 1947, in "....soft, dark forest green..." When was the last car you saw a CCCA Full Classic finished in "soft, dark forest green?" And the Delage D8 is lovely. It likely exists today, coated with requisite concours color. Note neither of these quietly elegant, road-hungry cars have whitewalls . Only one of the pictured cars is so shod, and look how tacky, loud, garish it looks contrasted with the others. Why o why aren't more CCCA Classics restored, preserved with such original look, aura? It's as easy as selecting a color like "soft, forest green," claret, indigo, ordering blackwall tires, forgetting the fog/driving lights, which you rarely saw, then. So easy. Less is more. When will people learn? The MG-TC isn't a Classic, of course. But was there ever a cleaner, jauntier car? You can't alter a single line. The Phantom II EX-25 touring car is hysterical. Those nervous louvers must be intended to cool the frame. Many thanks, T-Head. These pictures are of the sort of casual elegance that drew many of us to Classic cars, and are all but gone today.