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1947 or 1948 Lincoln


VAV
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Hi Everyone,

 

My name is Vince (VAV) and I'm trying to learn about a Lincoln that's been in my family since the late 1940's.  There's confusion on if it's a 1947 or 1948 and what model it might be.  I'd like to restore the vehicle and step 1 is to get a new title issued since my family can't find the original one.  I can tell you all it's a v-12 and I believe the number on the car is:  876H7326612.  It's a 4 door (suicide).  I've attached 2 pictures, which aren't very good to help you all, but it's all I have at the moment.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

IMG_4582.jpeg

IMG_4585.jpeg

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It might be the body number tag.  I'm going to visit in a couple of weeks and will look where you described.  Thanks so much for the help and info.  No one can recall the year of the car and none of us are familiar enough to know the difference in the models.  When I look on the internet, it seems the Continental and Zephyr looked similar in '47 and '48.  I'm pretty certain this car is one of those years and one of those models.  I'm looking at your helpful chart.  I see Zephyr specifically listed in, say '42.  But in '47 and '48 it just says Lincoln V-12.  Did they make the Zephyr in '47 & '48?

 

Again,  thanks very much.

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Another couple of things that may help.  Your hood "spear" was used in '41, but a llittle different , '42 was single blade, '46 used "V" shape ornament.

' 47 &'48 both used your type. Check your hubcaps , , "Lincoln" was a gold script. So far nothing firm BUT  for some reason the Lincoln folks at FORD decided to change the fog/ running lights to clear!!  '46 and '47 were amber .  19tom40 has it right, look for the VIN on the frame. It is also stamped on frame back near gas fill pipe. This maybe covered by dirt/ or rust. Try to find or borrow a MOTORS repair manual for '35-'52. They list the starting serial #'s for each year. Welcome to the old car hobby and    please join "The Lincoln- Zephy Owners Club" if you have not already.-Larry

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Thanks so much to ALL of you.  This is extremely helpful.  I can't wait to continue learning about this vehicle and bringing back to life.  I'll keep you all posted as I collect information when I get to the vehicle in a couple of weeks.

 

Sincerely,

 

Vince

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After doing a little more research, the numbers that you posted appear to be the body number.

 

876H7326612 = 876 - 1948 Lincoln, 73 -body type 4 door sedan, 26612 body serial number.

 

The car appears to be a 1948 Lincoln sedan. You will need to find the frame serial number in order to get a new title. Check with the DMV to see what they need to get an new title. If you know the name, address, serial number and the last year that it was registered for plates, you may be able to get a replacement title without an inspection.

 

When cleaning the frame to look for the number, do not use abrasives as you could erase 1 or more numbers.

 

Start by washing the frame with a good grease dissolving soap and use a scraper to gently remove any heavy build up of grease or rust. If there is a lot of rust, I like to use Evapo Rust gel. It doesn't harm the metal and is friendly to the environment. Here is a link to how to use it:    https://evapo-rust.com/how-to-use-evapo-rust-gel/

 

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If the car is an unrestored car, you should try to keep it that way. If you need to rejuvenate the paint, there is a U-Tube video on using Meguire's  No. 7 Show Car Glaze on how to bring back most of the original shine and add the original oils back int the paint. The procedure is labor intensive, but well worth the effort.

 

My 1953 Lincoln is an unrestored car. The top of my car is painted with a metallic color, but after 67 years, you would not know it. I used the procedure on the car and now you can see the metallic component of the paint and the car looks much better than when I bought it. The rest of the car looks great also.

 

The other day, I made a BIG mistake, the left front fender looked dull in the garage light, so I applied some of the Show Car Glaze and let it sit overnight. The next day, I wiped it off and applied some Jay Leno wax that was given to me. Now I have to do the whole car over again. The fender looks like it was just painted.

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Good suggestion Tom.  This car hasn't been driven for perhaps 50 years.  However, when my Father-in-law parked it last, it was inside.  So there it's sat.  No rust, interior shot from mice, dried out hoses, etc.  The typical long non use conditions, but INSIDE.   That saved it!   There's a dent on the passenger front fender thanks to my Mother-in-law, but a small price to pay.

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If you do decide to start up your Lincoln,  DO NOT DO IT  until you lower pan, clean out "mud", pull the intake manifold and again clean out the "mud",

drop the tank and really clean it out.  You will probably  have to rebuild carb, rebuild or replace fuel pump. If engine oil used is unknow, use 

detergent  30 WT. and change it again! Replace oil filter, ( if canister) is on the engine. I ruined a V12 In a '40 Zephyr years ago by taking shot cuts.

I have done the above on my '48LC coupe , and it runs great!

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After 50 years of storage, this is not a "put some gas and a fresh battery, start it up and go for a joy ride" project.

 

The brakes are probably toast and you will probably need all new hoses and cylinders. The shoes are probably stuck to the drums. Some of the brake steel lines may be rusted on the inside, so it is probably a good idea to replace them. The fuel tank is probably coated with varnish that will loosen and clog the fuel line when fresh gas is put in, so the tank, flex line and fuel pump will need to be replaced and the carburetor will need to be rebuilt. The copper coated steel line should also be replaced as it may have varnish or rust on the inside. The engine maybe stuck after all those years and the valve springs probably have taken a set, so they won't work very well. The distributor and coils should also be checked out before you try to start it.

 

I would sit down and make a list of all that has to be done and parts that need to be rebuilt or replaced before you try to drive it and then organize it so you can allocate the time and money needed to get things done. Think about things like do you want good brakes before you get the engine running, so you can tow the car or do you want to get the engine running first so you have an incentive to work on the brakes?

 

Quite a few of the parts can be bought from Rock Auto, NAPA or you corner parts house, others will have to come from vendors that make supporting the hobby their business.

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