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37 plymouth cope


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I recently purchased this 37 plymouth coupe it is in overall good condition I am considering a V8 swap I would like info on doing this. I wish to maintian a stock appearance as well as the straight axle front end if possible. I would appreciate any info

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The AACA judges cars based on how they were delivered to the dealer. I suspect that many of the people who monitor this discussion forum are cringing at your question. While my preferences are toward touring rather than judged shows, I share the feeling that cars should be kept original. (I will also admit to keeping the Hadees heater that was installed sometime in the first couple of years of the car's life. A definite point loss item for judging.)<P>Your six cylinder engine was used, with minor updates, until 1959 in passenger cars and into the 1960s in other applications. I had a 1966 Dodge truck service manual that gave rebuild and service procedures for that basic motor. Nearly all the parts for the six are still available on special order at your local auto supply and those few that aren't are easily available by mail order.<P>Other than faster acceleration why would you want ot swap out the motor? To spend a bunch of money to decrease the value of the car?<P>Tod Fitch<P>------------------<BR>1933 Plymouth PD<BR>AACA #281304

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I'm a hot rodder myself so I can see the appeal but if you've got the original drivetrain in that car I'd say restore it. Engine swaps of that nature are best left for cars that are too far gone to be worth restoring.<P>Cheers,<BR>Bry<P>------------------<BR>1940 Chrysler Royal ...... 1974 Dodge 100 Adventurer<BR>1970 Dodge Charger ...... 1985 Jaguar XJ-S V12

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Late 30s Mopar coupes have a relatively high value when correctly restored. Tod is offering good advice. Why spend a lot of bucks to ruin the value, especially if the car is an easy restoration.

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I second the nomination. Bry, you're talking like one of us more and more. We're really looking forward to you getting rid of the XK-whatever and getting going on the Chrysler. (Just joking about the "whatever" - I think the XK120s and 140s were fabulous cars).

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The more I think about this, the more I think it's a bad idea. When you put a V8 in there you will at least double the horsepower. You can't just double a car's horsepower and do nothing to prepare it for the onslaught.<P>The entire drivetrain will need to be replaced with more current components to handle the power. For the car to retain any semblance of driveability with that kind of power and weight increase you'll need to revise or replace the suspension and especially the BRAKES. Also you'll need to convert from 6-volt to 12-volt electrics, which will involve either replacing everything or at the very least wiring up a trick harness so the engine gets 12V and everything else gets 6V.<P>If you had an empty shell, I'd say go for it. Why not? But based on your description you have a pretty clean car, not really material for a job like this. First it would be far more expensive, and more work, to start with a car like that; second, it'd really be a waste of a good restoration car.<P>Since it sounds like you want to retain original appearances, I'd say keep it original. What is the planned use for the car?<P>Cheers,<BR>Bry

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Aw gee whiz guys... I just call it like I see it.<P>I wouldn't cut that car up, even if it was given to me.<P>Cheers,<BR>Bry

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