Jump to content

are they collector cars yet?


dlapple
 Share

Recommended Posts

are Reattas collector cars yet? i think so, so why are they so cheap? the prices are the same as any other old heap. a smart car lover with money would buy them up now. when i hit the lottery i'm going to buy dozens of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These cars are just old enough that many first, or second, owners are now trading them for something newer. Couple that with many high mileage ones still going and padgett is right, there are a lot for sale right now.<BR>If this car follows past trends, the high mileage ones and not-well-cared-for will start to dissappear and the remaining ones will start to increase in value. I predict<BR>about 5 more years for that cycle to finish.<BR>BUT, there is one difference with Reattas: Most old cars that wildly rise in value were highly desirable when they were new. While the Reatta was, and is special, people weren't exactly lining up to buy it when new (which is mostly why they were discontinued). So, that aspect might keep eventual collector prices lower than, say, 60s muscle cars are now. To spend big money on an old car people needed to have dreamed about it when they were young. And as many of you report, people are always asking "what is it". So, for an eventual retirement nest egg a Duesie in the barn would still be better than our Reattas :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest EDBS0

carz60 has it figured out when he says "Most old cars that wildly rise in value were highly desirable when they were new."<P>Like me, you better be buying and driving because you like the ride and uniqueness not for future investment potential.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to add something to the equation: Little T-Birds ('55-'57) were very popular in the newish years, then fell into disfavor when Ford stopped producing parts (mainly trim). You could pick up a so-so '57 for about $1500 -- but you couldn't get window seals, hashmarks, fender skirts, etc., except used at high prices. Only when the specialty suppliers (John Baum, Jake, Larry, etc.) made arrangements for offshore production of parts did the market take off. Today, you can virtually build a new little Thunderbird from the ground up. But the production numbers have to support it. There were 53,000+ Birds built in those three years. Well over than half of them are still alive and accounted for, which supports a healthy marketplace. Now...take the total of Reattas built and try to factor in the number still in existence. Will that support reproduction of reproduction parks? Only time will tell.<P>A girl just clipped the rear of my '90 on the freeway. It scuffed the bumper guards, loosened the impact strip, scratched the lower fiberglass panel and pulled the fiberboard undercowling loose. Not a single one of those parts is available new; my body shop just ordered an entire rear end (bumper down) from Speedway. Wouldn't you think that at least the impact strip and bumper guards would be available new in a primer finish?<P>Jerry<P>P.S. Incidentally, the Reatta is built like a tank in the rear. As noted, the damage was really minor (cosmetic), but it totaled the new KIA that hit me. The hood was doubled up so high the driver couldn't see over it to drive. Took out the grille, bumper and both fenders/headlights, as well as the hood. Tough cars, these Reattas!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Keep in mind that poor sales when new is not a measure or desirability 20 years on but it takes 20 years to be recognized. Most muscle cars were essentially worthless between 1975 and 1985. Considering that the oldest Reatta is only 14 means that they are nearing the bottom of the curve.<P>If you want a good indicator, watch Fieros (1984-1988), they bottomed out and are starting up again particularly the '84 Pace Cars - talk about dead - they only had 80 hp - the 2.8 V-6 did not appear until 1985.<P>For that matter, most "muscle cars" really weren't, they just looked that way. Few, particularly the base models (the 318 Chrysler engine that powered many such was a joke in the industry) could even get into the fifteens.<P>Yes, it would have been nice if the SC engine had made it into the Reatta even just as an option but to me (and I have a 4spd Judge for fun) the n/a 3800 has always been "adequate". Nothing special from a standing start but the legendary Buick "turbine" effect just keeps coming. 50-70 is always a surprise, it just happens.<P>However if you look at the real collectables, many were too expensive for the time and just as many were considered slow by their contemporaries. For example, at the time the 55-57 T'bird was comsidered adequate but not in the same league as a dual quad or FI Corvette, an XK-140MC Jag, or even a 100-6 Healey.<P>Look around at what is valuable today and it is not the fastest, but the most optioned. Fast doesn't hurt but few collectors could handle the really fast cars anyway (have had affiacandos shudder when I power shift the Judge - what do they think these cars were for).<P>Ten years on, I doubt that the power will matter but today they are just too new.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me offer a different perspective. As a large Buick dealer during the Reatta era, we found the cars very desireable BUT at sale prices around $30,000. Buick sold us many of the Reattas as company cars with "just around the block" miles in the high $20,000s.All the time Buick was building the car they complained that they lost $10,000 per car. The Reatta at the right price was a very popular car.I probably sold 25 or 30 Reattas and many of my customers are still drivig them!!!<BR>Tom Payette TPayetteKY@aol.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest EDBS0

Hey Tom; Just got back from THUNDER, what a show Louisville should be proud!!!<P>So what you are saying is that they were popular but pricey. Can't you say that about anything and any car? Wouldn't and couldn't you sell more of "ABC" be it beer or cars at a lower price. Don't get me wrong, I love the cars. The build quality is outstanding and the Reatta is nearly unique in this.<P>In any event it is good to hear from a Dealer on the Reatta. I think the Reatta is on the upside of the "U" shaped depreciation curve but it will likely be a slow climb.<BR> fireworkshot01.jpg Doesn't start to do the show justice.<p>[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: Easily Distracted by Shiny Objects ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...