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Restoring my 6107


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Well this is the first time I will be looking into truley doing a car right. I have aquired a 1947 model 6107. It is about 98% complete and metal is about as good as can be expected it was a southwest car. I have begun the tear down and plan to remove the body from the frame and work my way back up. My question is simple and will probably start a war amongst the pureists and those of us who want functionality with history. I am presently debating the worthiness of saving the engine and transmission versus placing a crate engine and new tranny in the beast. the present drivetrain has probably not been turned in 20 years. I cant being to predict it's condition till I open it up. However, I want to use this as a touring car and drive acroos the country in it during the spring and summer months. How easy is it to get parts for this engine and has anyone rebuilt one so it will run on modern unleaded fuel? Don't fret you pure restorers, even if I put a crate in it I would never part with the original motor and tranny they stay with the car even if they are not installed.

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Hey that's great, Craig! I will tell you, my '47 sat for over 30 years in a barn and runs beautifully. The transmission is very strong. The reason? It was well built and solid. I would not count it out. Of course, I do not know your car and haven't seen it.

Putting a crate engine in and modern transmission is always an option, but I would take a look at rebuilding the flathead 346 cid V-8....I have a great deal of respect and fondness for mine.

Just a thought.

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Nice looking Cadi! Looks like it will be a fun project. What kind of budget do you have for the car?

I would think a nice crate engine and transmission would cost a bit more than a rebuild of your current setup, if the original motor and transmission are rebuild able. Not to mention the expense of setting the car up to run a more modern drive line.

But it would sure be fun! cool.gif

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Thanks for the welcome. I am really wrestling with where to go with this engine situation. Did you adapt your original to run unleaded? How hard was it to find parts to rebuild. I am fairly certain that the block is good but by the time I break it down and magnaflux the block and heads I will be committed to rebuilding the engine unless it is cracked. Like I said my wife and I want to tour in it and I have an old teardrop I restored, I want to tow it with the Caddy. I feel a vehicle this well intact should stay fairly original but then there is comfort and reliability to consider. Thanks I will keep the site posted on my progress and welcome any suggestions especially from '47 owners.

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Craig, I did nothing whatever to the engine. I put in 87 to 92 octane unleaded and every other tank add a non-lead substitute. I do not have knocking, get reasonable gas mileage (15 mpg highway) and it gets up and runs....I actually had it over 100 last summer. I did not do it for long and I would not recommend it but I was happy with the response. I cruise regularly at 65-70 with no problems. When I do have the engine rebuilt, I will put in hardened valve seats but I want to keep it mostly original. Besides...these cars all ran on unleaded unless the owner specifically used Gulf NoKnock or the original Ethel gas. They had non-lead substitutes in the 30s so I would not worry too much about it. All the lead gives you is better lubrication at the molecular level and keeps the valves from knocking.

I don't know about towing but I should think it would not hurt the engine. These are very hardy cars. <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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Craig, this car is worth keeping original! You will be surprised by the excellent performance of the original powertrain set-up, and the value of the car will be significantly greater if you maintain the originality. The consensus is that you need not worry about lead substitute, unless you are planning to do a great deal of hard acceleration or consistent steep grades.

Regarding towing a trailer, that would be no sweat. One of my friends drove his 1947 Buick Special (with Buick's smaller straight-8) from Seattle to Michigan and back this summer, towing a heavy vintage tent trailer all the way. The car did not struggle in the least, and your 1947 Cadillac would have no difficulty. How much more gratifying to open that long hood on your cross-country adventures and show off that original Cadillac powertrain rather than the usual hot rod set-up!

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  • 4 weeks later...

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