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1950 Plym Front Shocks, Sway Bar


StillOutThere
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I have a 1950 Plymouth P19 business coupe. 

 

Apparently they are not equipped with a factory front anti-sway bar.  Car Needs One!!!    Would be interested in at least a stock unit.  Will one from a '50 DeSoto /Chrysler or Imperial bolt in?   Need complete with brackets /links.

 

Front shock absorbers are uncommonly short.  Loop mounting ("E1") both ends.  8.625" compressed.  12.750" extended.  Have looked all over creation for something to fit.   Everyone and their brother sell Monroe Spectra #5752 and they are totally useless garbage my old arms can easily compress and extend off of the car.  Cheap junk!  I've even looked at QA-1, Koni, early VW, T-Bucket rod, and found nothing to suit.  No room for coil-overs.

Would really appreciate any suggestion of what to do here.  What have you used?

 

One thought was to upgrade to some 1950 MoPar 8 cylinder car front coil springs to try to get this front end stabilized.  Anyone done this? 

 

Thanks!

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Does your car have the shocks that mount to the upper and lower control arms?

I know that some of the Chryslers of that period did.

If it does one good thing that you can do is put shocks that bracket to the frame for the top mount.

I am pretty sure someone sells a kit for this.

Try google I guess.

Or here    https://p15-d24.com/index.php?

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The upper mount is to the frame. Lower to the control arm.   Can't perceive how "arm to arm" could work as the arms move together?

 

I did look into what shock is offered for the '50 Chrysler and even Imperial limousines.  Same cheap junk #5752.  If its bad on my bantam-weight business coupe then selling them for the big heavy models is an insult to car collectors.

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21 hours ago, StillOutThere said:

Can't perceive how "arm to arm" could work as the arms move together?

 

It didn't work very well.

I guess the theory was that being different lengths they do in fact get some dampening, but not much.

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