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I received two replies to my first posting (1916 overland) that suggested I use 30W non-detergent. However, I found the following message posted by ronbarn:<P>"I used the single weight non-detergent oils until I heard Harold Sharon, one of the supreme old car technicians explain that today's oils are far superior, and that to<BR>use a non-detergent oil just because there is no filter to remove the contaminants is not in the best interest of the engine. Use detergent oils and change more frequently.<BR>Oil is cheap - rebuilding engines is not. I know this is an opinion that several have already expressed, but when Harold says it, I am convinced. Works for me!"<P>Should I use 30W as suggested, or does this change anyones opinion? rolleyes.gif" border="0

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For me, it depends on what the inside of the engine looks like. If everything is clean for the most part, I'd use detergent oil. If it has sludge I would use non-detergent. <P>If the engine has sludge build-up, that sludge is formed in places that aren't getting worn. I'm thinking like pistons, rings, side clearance on rods. If you use non-detergent oil, that sludge stays put. I'll still change oil on a regular schedule. If you were to use detergent in that sludged engine, think about the word detergent. Detergents clean, therefore cleaning that sludge out of those areas, putting it in the oil pan. Resualting in larger clearances therfore you end up with piston slap noisey rods from too much side clearance, noisey valve train, etc. At this time you'll want to rebuild it.<P>Short version:<BR>Clean engine -- detergent oil<BR>Dirty engine -- non-detergent oil<P>As far as oil weight I don't deal with cars quite as old but I don't see a problem with a multi-weight oil like 10-W30. That just means when the oild is cold it flows like W10 and when warm W30. It would give you better oiling when the engine is cold.<P>My humble opinion.

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Scotty,<BR>if you run detergent oil in a not-rebuild old engine you will probably have later an engine with destroyed bearings. Why? You see, in the oil pan and in the engine is old dirt and the detergent in the oil will lose this dirt. The pump now pumps this dirt through the engine to the bearings, cylinders and so on because this engine has no oil filter.<BR>If the engine was rebuild and is clean indside you can use a 20 W 50 detergent oil but you have to change the oil often because (remember) you have no oil cleaner in the engine.<P>Tom

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The word DETERGENT is a misnomer. Detergent oils do NOT clean an engine the way you are thinking. Yes they will loosen sludge and crud....but that is why you pull and clean the pan...and that is something that NEEDS to be done periodicly if you run NON-detergent oil,<BR> DETERGENT oils are oils that have additives that prevent the formation of long-carbon-chain (read abrasive) contaminates. They prevent the sludge from forming. cool.gif" border="0 <BR> Bill

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Okay, maybe I didn't get the tech. part accurate. But the detergent oil does still clean. I didn't mean it like cleaning as in dumping a bottle of liquid Dove dish detergent in the motor. I was just trying to get across the fact that it will loosen the dirt and cause problems. Seen it happen to a Model A Ford on a 1000 mile tour. After 500 miles it sounded like someone inside the engine tapping with a hammer. Also have seen it happen to two other cars.<P>My first post with my new laptop (3 hrs old) smile.gif" border="0smile.gif" border="0

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Engine is rebuilt. When i drained the oil yesterday, it looked pretty clean. I filled it with SAE 30. I will switch oils after I get it started, which I am not exactly sure how to do right now.

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If your engine is rebuilt,I would use detergent oil.I use 20w50 detergent oil in all my cars.I have a 1913 Overland that I have used detergent oil for many years,with no problems.I even use it in my 1904 Northern.

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One other thing that detergent oil does is keep the contaminants suspended so that when you change the oil they flow out and don't settle out in the pan and/or oil journals. I would definitely use high detergent. It also has much better lubricating capabilities. If it cleans out a dirty engine and the valves start rattling and bearings start making noise, it's time to rebuild it anyhow.

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