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Tph479

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  1. My grandfather told me that as a kid growing up in Chicago during the depression that he really did not know what poor was because everyone was poor and in the same boat. He said it was just a normal way of life back then and you would play and go about everyday life. He use to laugh when telling stories about him eating from "mystery cans". Those were donated food cans without labels so you never knew what you would be eating until you opened them. He told me that the nuns used to write on his tuition invoice "paid in full" and he didn't realize until later in life that people who were in a better off financial position were donating money to the parish even in the worst of times. In his later days grandpa would go around to the local schools and repay the favor. He use to say that people now a days don't know what poor is because you can't be poor and have a credit card, cell phone and cadillac. My father and uncles said that grandpa never talked much about being in WW2, besides telling tall tale stories about being a Tail Gunner. I find that interesting because my grandpa use to tell me all sorts of stories about the war times. He spent most of his time on the Island of Saipan working on the airfield and filling up the B29's with fuel. Gramp's would tell stories on how some of the planes would come back pretty much blown to pieces and how he would wonder how they made it back. The ones that made it back were lucky because he said some buddies would fly off never to return. When grandpa got home to the old neighborhood he said it was kinda weird because friends and guys you knew before everyone went off to war also never returned and that you would hear the gossip of what happened to them..... Grandpa was never fond of politicians with their wars and the corresponding loss of life. My grandfather lived to the ripe old age of 97 and he use to tell me that when you live long enough you seen it all. I guess during his years he did experience a lot of history, events (both good and bad) and advances in society.
  2. I have a friend with a J. Recently he was contacted to check the crankshaft number on it. Another J owner is trying to unscramble his car and thought the crankshafts might have been swapped back in the day between the 2 engines.
  3. I see that you are also into collecting red gas cans...how many times have you or your dad run out of gas and you have had to buy another new one at the nearest gas station?
  4. Original poster is talking about convertible top fabric. Black on the outside, tan on the inside. There has been shortages in top and interior fabric from the usual supply houses. People restoring cars are running into this problem at the current time.
  5. Just did the math, using a 1932 900 and a 1932 904 sedan as a comparison. The 900 weighs 4,115 pounds and has 110 hp making 37.4 pounds per horsepower. The 904 weighs 5,195 pounds and has 135 hp making 38.48 pounds per horsepower. So the 900 is a little lighter on its feet... with a downdraft carburetor upgrade each engine gains 10 hp so it’s a wash. Base price of the 900 sedan was $1,750, the 904 sedan was $4,150 making the 904 2.37 times more expensive than the 900. The 1,080 pound variance between the two really makes the difference in the handling and driving experience, the price variance both then and now makes a difference in your pocketbook! Shall we talk about windshield height next? What would be the comparison numbers for the Pierce Arrow in 1932?
  6. You can get a core from Universal Carnegie Manufacturing out of Pennsylvania if you give them the dimensions.
  7. FYI- There is a link to the Packard Club website which you will find on the forum. There is a "Tech Tip" section on the left hand side of their web page with some good pointers.
  8. Did you check the water distribution tube behind the water pump? It may be rotted out and the rear of the engine might not be getting proper water flow to it. Since you have a newer radiator core with good flow I would rule the radiator out at this time. I know that you checked the fuel and ignition system already but check it again.There are two jets in that carb that each feed 4 cylinders and one of them may be getting clogged causing half of the engine to run lean sometimes. Make sure the distributor is working properly, that the weights are advancing, and check the spark plug wires and make sure the fittings are nice and tight and also check the condition of the spark plugs. A fouled out spark plug can cause you to run hot. You might want to do a quick compression test just to verify that you have consistent compression. If you have a digital thermometer check various spots on the radiator, cylinder head and exhaust manifold. The 1937 120 is a fine car and it should give you a lot of trouble free miles once tuned in. Packard would not have sold a bunch of 120's in 1937 if it was a temperamental car. Good luck.
  9. I’ll work up the power to weight ratio of both the 900 and 904 later today. The 900 has 110hp, the 904 has 135hp. Let’s not cheat with the downdraft carb... My friend has a 904 so I’ll ask him if we can do a side by side performance comparison with the 900 in the near future. I think the 900 also accounted for 60% of the sales in 1932 so it couldn’t have been that much of a disaster in the period, besides the factory losing money on every one they built. It can be argued that Packard went downstream in 1922 with the single six.... I would enjoy seeing the literature you have. It should also be stated that the 900 was Jessie Vincents pet project, and that he had Werner Gubitz , Packards head designer draw it up. Gubitz previously worked for Dietrich- What’s for lunch and whose paying? Should we both have are credit cards ready?
  10. In regards to the 900 performance, I have period info somewhere in the house showing that the only Packard the 900 did not out perform in 1932 was the twin six roadster. The attached picture shows the 900 performance compared to other Packard standard eight cars. I would be willing to bet a lunch that the 900 could hold its own in a race against a 904. On a road track I would even bet dinner and drinks also. Would be a fun challenge if we could make it happen! I don’t have any experience with a Pierce so I can not comment on there performance. As you can tell I’m a 900 enthusiast. If anyone wants info on these cars let me know and I’ll share the literature that I have.
  11. 1932 Lincoln KB. Interesting double entry door set up. Would be neat to see how it worked.
  12. The 1932 light eight is probably the finest and best driving, and maybe the quickest model that Packard up that point in time. This car is a little high on price for what it is. It would look better without all of the clutter on the front bumper and without the driving lights and extra set of mirrors. It would probably look better with black wall tires. Hope it finds a good home.
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