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35 Airflow spare tire cover


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#1 jazzer3

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 04:10 AM

Happy New Year everyone, I bought a 35 C2 Airflow to serve as reference and parts as I work on a 36 C10 but have decided to fix the 35 up. Included are some photos of before and after. I had to see how good it could look without restoration before I tackle the rust problem underneath. Tonight I was able to remove all 12 bolts holding the front seat frame to the floor, it took a lot of turning in and out and in and out but they all finally came out.
I cannot get the spare tire cover off, I removed the shoulder bolt and looked for any other fasteners and can't find anything, is it just stuck? A few raps with a brass punch and heavy hammer to the center washer didn't help. I recently saw a photo of a 35 Plymouth and it appears to have the same style cover.
Now that the interior is out the car is going up on jackstands there is a whole lot of metal replacing needed.
Why can't I get that spare tire cover off,
Jay

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#2 Alfa

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 02:11 PM

The spare tyre cover is secured by the 19mm (3/4") bolt in the centre, which threads into a steel bracket in turn bolted to the rear of the body. In addition, there is an over-centre catch on the outside of the cover, at the bottom. Undo both and it should come off.

Just in case it has the wrong size tyre within, try deflating the tyre inside to make things easier.

Adam..

#3 jazzer3

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 10:23 PM

Thanks Adam, Last night I was checking out the joint at the bottom of the stainless molding that goes around the circumference of the cover, one side of the joint has two rivets and the other side has a hole about 1/8" diameter and is located close to the joint. I tried pushing a small punch into the hole thinking it might release something but had no luck, although I didn't really put much effort as it was getting late and I had already accomplished removing all 12 bolts holding the front seat frame to the floor, so I was happy about that.

Jay

#4 Alfa

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 02:16 PM

Hi Jay

Just a further thought; with the central bolt loose or removed, it should be possible to spin the cover on the spare wheel so that the catch at the bottom is visible to one side or the other. It may help you see what is going on within.

Interesting looking car. Is it running? I would be tempted to get it running and drive it just the way it is. It would grab much attention that way and you would have no fears about it getting scratched if you leave it in a car park.

Adam..

Edited by Alfa, 05 January 2012 - 02:22 PM.


#5 jazzer3

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 02:41 AM

Adam I bought this as a parts car but after getting it into my shop I decided it needs to go back on the road. The last two weeks were spent cleaning the car to see how presentable it could become and I am pleased with the results.
It doesn't run but I'm not too concerned about that it will have a straight 8 but it might be a 50 engine.
I will have to replace all side windows and do some rust repair under the door sills.
My goal is to have it on the road looking just about as it sits here. It is amazing what some compound and polish will do. I found both keys in a glove box and they work the ignition, door, and glove box.
My ignition key is offset is this correct for a 35?
I've included a pic of the engine in the car and it appears to be cracked but comparing it to the engine for our 36 there is also a line running parallel to the deck surface and just below it.
I am supposed to be putting an engine in our 50 Dodge Coronet but every time I get to the shop I start playing with the Airflow. I'm going to put it up on stands and give the underside of all the flooring fasteners a shot with penetrating oil and let it sit while the Dodge gets fixed.

Jay

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#6 Alfa

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 02:41 PM

Hi Jay

Thanks for sharing the extra photos. Very interesting. My car is a 1935 Airflow 6 (Badged as Chrysler for the UK market, it is a DeSoto SE), pictured on the other thread about finding gaskets. It has the offset key exactly like yours, which fits the ignition and the one lockable (with key) door.

What a shame about the crack in your block, although it is hard to make out in the photo. I would have thought it could be repaired. There are number of companies here that offer metal stitching to repair such damage. There must be someone near you that can do that work.

Still, for the moment you had better leave the Airflow and get on with the other car!!!!:)

Did you manage to remove the spare wheel cover yet?

Adam Moody,

#7 jazzer3

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 03:11 AM

Hey Adam, I haven't been to my shop for a day or two, I'll wrestle that tire cover tomorrow if possible, my Wife's family celebrates Christmas this weekend, we had Holy Supper tonight, and I can't use "working on old cars" as an excuse not to be there, actually it is nice, they are very traditional with a lot of singing in an unknown language.
There are five screws around the circumference of the stainless strip on the face of the spare tire cover and not knowing if they are original I thought it might be possible someone ran screws right through into the sidewall of the spare. I turned one screw loose and a nut dropped out from behind so I eliminated that as a problem.
As far as the engine goes if it is cracked I worked as a welder most of my life and it included a lot of maintenance welding, If it is weldable I hope I can do it.
Our 50 Coronet is a nice car but hasn't been driven for about five years and needs to be driven before it needs everything fixed. I recently bought the running gear from a 55 Plymouth and hope this engine is okay to put right in.
If possible tomorrow the 35 is going up on stands and getting the undercarriage sprayed with penetrating oil then it can sit for a while.
Jay

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#8 jazzer3

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 02:07 AM

Adam I put a bear hug on the tire cover and tried to turn it with no luck but I pulled on on side and felt it loosen, working around the circumference it came off. I was afraid to pull too hard as it felt like it was about to kink, if you look at the one photo it looks like the tire was vulcanized to the cover. There was no need to remove anything but the center bolt.
Both seats are out, I was all the way back to the trunk the trunk floor mat and the fiber side boards are in good condition. I saw a little bit of the trunk floor and it looks solid all the rust repair should be around the perimeter.
Thanks everyone,
Jay

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#9 Alfa

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 03:47 PM

Hooray !!!

I was worried about that cover. Thanks for the pics of the back of the car. It looks as though it will be quite straightforward to sort out. I look forward to hearing about it.

The metal stitching I mentioned involves drilling a succession of small holes across the crack and inserting small rods to "stitch" it together. This can be more successful than welding on large castings.

My local company is "Surelock" in Oakham. Google their website for details.

Like the 50 Coronet too.

Adam..

Edited by Alfa, 09 January 2012 - 03:51 PM.


#10 jazzer3

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 01:10 AM

Adam I took a wire brush and a sharp edged scraper to what I thought was the crack and think the block is OK in that area. I'm not pulling any of the running gear out until I get some rust repair completed but I am thinking of filling the engine and transmission with a kerosene and marvel mystery oil concoction and let sit. Tomorrow I want to get front carpet out, and anything else in the way of removing the floor boards. Then it goes up on stands, I'm curious to pull the brake drums to find out how things look. Thanks for your interest.
Jay

#11 Alfa

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 04:43 PM

Hey that sounds like great news. Is the engine seized? or does it turn? In any case a soak in kero won`t do any harm at all. If it is free and will turn on the starter, I would be tempted to do a compression test, or better yet, a cylinder leakage test.

I have done the brakes on my car a couple of times. So I will be interested to hear how you get on. Do you have a hub puller for the rear?

Adam..

#12 jazzer3

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Posted 13 January 2012 - 09:14 PM

The puller is on with pressure applied, hope it has popped until I see it again. I have a Proto puller I've used on our other Chrysler products but they are all five lugs with the six lugs I am only able to use two of the puller arms. If necessary I can borrow a different style puller from a friend.
The engine is definitely stuck when winching it off the trailer I couldn't understand why it didn't want to move, it was in gear, the manifolds, starter, distributor and some other parts have been removed but I did get them with the car.
The interior is down to the boards all padding and trunk lining is out and it sits on jackstands and everything underneath was sprayed with penetrating oil.
One photo shows the new interior light. It was too dark inside the car and there happened to be a florescent light fixture not being used, it is nice and bright inside now. The rubber mat for the trunk is in nice condition, note photo of backside of mat with the Goodyear logo. Why was there a mat all the way in the rear of the car behind the fiber board trunk lining? (there is a photo of it)
Jay

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#13 Alfa

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 12:58 PM

Hi Jay

I have a sykes pickavant hydraulic puller which deals with the hub tapers with ease. You can swap the number of legs to make any combination. However, it sounds as though you are familiar with doing the job.

The rest of the car looks quite fair. Some welding in the back, but easy work as it is hidden when finished. The engine may be more of a challenge.

I do like the new design interior light though!!

Adam..

#14 jazzer3

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 05:14 PM

Hello again, the challenge that worries me the most now is figuring out how the different body panels meet each other particularly in the support areas. I will remove the fuel tank next but from the inside I see two body supports way back there that seem to be their own islands also there are straps that run from the inner fender to the arched channel that are undone.
Do you know of any publications that would have body specifications or critical measurements of the body structure?
All doors line up well and open and shut as if their supports are solid, it is just getting everything from the sill down sorted out. The bottoms of the doors are as solid as new.
Although I am not restoring the outside of the car I don't want to do anything underneath that would have to be redone if the next sucker:D decides to restore the car.
Are repair panels made for these cars, I hoped maybe a repair panel made for a different vehicle would work.
I found a good article in the Airflow Tech CD on floor construction written by Pete Haldiman although it is for a 34 DeSoto coupe it is a well detailed drawing, I'm sure it will help in replacing the floor boards. I need all the input I can get!
Take care all,
Jay

#15 Alfa

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 01:44 PM

Sorry I do not know any publication that would give that information. My own Airflow 6 is completely sound in the bodywork.

I should think you could take a few clues from the other car in the photos, couldn`t you?

Adam..

#16 jazzer3

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Posted 17 January 2012 - 05:33 PM

I am hoping to be able to compare them I don't know now if there are differences in the rear support structure due to the body design change between 35 and 36 but I bet I find out. I originally bought the 35 to use as reference and maybe an occasional part in getting the 36 running it seems now I'll be doing the opposite. Too cold here now to work on it but I need to go to my shop to get some plumbing tools I'll check that drum puller while I'm there hopefully it popped.
Jay

#17 JohnArthurSpinks

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:27 AM

Hi Jay and Adam,
I have been monitoring your communications with interest and thought that maybe I could assist you on the repairs of your C2.
The support straps that you refer to in the trunk area on the C2 are to support the spare tire carrier and tire.
As you no doubt will agree the weight of the tire and rim is very significant and without the supports the tire sitting on the rear of the body would eventually end up inside the trunk.
The structural design in the '35 body is almost identical to that which is in your C10.
They are both Imperial versions of the Airflow and share the same frame and body panels albeit with a few subtle changes.
The most major being that a hole was cut in the rear of the C10 body and a bustle trunk was fitted up and lead moulded into the body.
To my knowledge you will not find any replacement rust repair panels anywhere nor will you find anything from any other vehicle that will substitute.
The Airflow broke new ground in many areas and from our experiences here in Aussie we have had to manufacture panels etc to replace those that were kaput.
Jay do you have a '34 Airflow Body Manual as this shows most of what you need to know albeit with slight variations that occurred each year.
anyway must close as I have many pressing issues at moment.
Please keep in touch as I may be able to help you.
Finally are you a member of the Airflow Club?
Cheers
John Spinks
email johnspinks@dodo.com.au

#18 JohnArthurSpinks

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:47 AM

Jay,
Jon Clulow is in Pasadena MD which is only a couple of hundred miles from you and maybe if you send me your email address I could on forward it to him and maybe he could help out with advice etc as he has an absolute magnificent C10.
cheers
John S
Aussie C9 Chrysler Airflow Coupe

#19 jazzer3

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 03:45 AM

Hello John, Thanks for your reply I need to get the gas tank out so I can get a better idea of how things were when new. I have the body manual and owner's manual ordered along with a new accelerator pedal, pedal pads and a shift boot so I'm committed to getting it on the road.
I'm including a photo of the trunk area, the two adjustable straps visible seem to be fine. I was referring to straps that are welded between the inner fender and the arched channel coming from the roof they are barely visible on the photo but are located just above the intersection of the cross brace, just about where my electric cord intersects the arch. There is one on each side and measure approximately 1/16" by 2". These straps are no longer one piece they were snapped or broken but not rusted. They should be visible on the 36 by just removing the trunk liner, duh I just now thought of that. I want to get some measurements before I start to tie things back together.
I won't be doing anything in a hurry it is cold and I don't like turning on the heat. By Spring I should have a pretty good idea what needs to be done.
I have also included a picture of the mat that was located behind the trunk lining way back there. Was this area for tool storage?
And check out the fender installation! All fenders are banged up but the left front. And if you read my posts you know I want to drive it as it looks I won't be making it beautiful as you do in your restorations.
Thanks,
Jay

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#20 JohnArthurSpinks

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 08:01 AM

Hi Jay,
The small extension bracket that spans from the main super structure across to the inner fender well on each side was not connected on the Airflows but i cannot confirm if that was the case on all.
The 1935 SG Desoto Airflow that we are currently restoring for a client has the same brace and it is oxy flame cut through in the exact same way as that in your C2.
I will attempt to attach a number of photos to support my statement.
It is extremely unusual but it appears that the main super structure rails somehow missed the boat and were some 10 to 15 mm further in than they had originally designed them to be.
Really it probably meant that one of the design engineers or architects probably were docked 10 cents out of their salary for screwing up.
Man I guess you are discovering the inner secrets of an Airflow, and it is nice to note that a pair of very keen eyes are looking at this beast very closely
Enjoy the challenge
Cheers
John S




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