Alfa

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About Alfa

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 08/16/1966

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Old England

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  • Biography
    Automotive Engineer, passionate about vintage & classic engineering and motor sport.

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  1. I owned a 1960 Buick Electra for about 15 years. It worked really well with the Dynaflow trans. It kept up with modern traffic and could regularly overtake the moderns. The acceleration was very strong with the 401 engine and in 'low' it would leave two black lines on the road. What more do you want? It is not a car for drag racing, or burnouts, if you want to do that go and buy a Nissan drift car. It is a very smooth and characterful road car. Lots of fun. Honestly! Adam..
  2. why not drop the sump (oil pan?) and have a look before removing the engine? how confident are you in the secondhand pistons and rod bearings? I would drop the pan and check the big-end bearings first. Also, if it has an oil pump, can you check for output and oil pressure? Is the relief valve correctly set?
  3. I agree with Joe`s (and the US army`s) view on cotter pins, except that we call them split pins. A cotter pin, in the UK, is a round pin with a flat on one side and a nut on the end, as used to secure kingpins (or are those steering swivel pins???)
  4. you might also try your local hydraulic hose supplier. The sort that make up hoses for diggers and excavators and the like.
  5. Thanks everyone!! The De Soto valve is similar to the Buick one, I think. It is a flap rather like a choke flap in a carburettor, that pivots in the valve body, controlled by a bi-metallic spring. When cold, the spring ensures that the valve is held such that the exhaust stream from the manifold is directed upwards to hit the underside of the cast iron inlet manifold. The gas then does a U turn to head down the exhaust pipe. When warm, and the bi-metallic spring reacts very quickly if you get a blow lamp near it (!), the valve is rotated so that the hot exhaust is deflected downwards to the exhaust pipe directly and shielded away from the base of the inlet manifold. I very much appreciate all the advice here. I think I will try it without the valve, but in the knowledge that I can remove the manifold and drill and install if need be. Adam..
  6. I am fitting a new exhaust manifold to my 1935 Desoto Airflow SE 6. I have a bare casting and am busy drilling and tapping holes and the like. The manifold heat riser valve is secured into the old manifold by welding to the spindle in 3 places. It will be tricky to swap over and may necessitate a new valve. The problem is I need to get the car running very quickly, having agreed to drive some friends to their wedding in September. My question is, how important is the heat riser valve for driving in moderate conditions? Could I get away with leaving it out? even if only temporarily? I have heard of problems when the valve is stuck in one position and heating the base of the inlet manifold, but if there were no valve present, I think this should be less of a problem. Does anyone have any experience of this they can share? Thank you Adam..
  7. I am fitting a new exhaust manifold to my 1935 Desoto Airflow SE 6. I have a bare casting and am busy drilling and tapping holes and the like. The manifold heat riser valve is secured into the old manifold by welding to the spindle in 3 places. It will be tricky to swap over and may necessitate a new valve. The problem is I need to get the car running very quickly, having agreed to drive some friends to their wedding in September. My question is, how important is the heat riser valve for driving in moderate conditions? Could I get away with leaving it out? even if only temporarily? I have heard of problems when the valve is stuck in one position and heating the base of the inlet manifold, but if there were no valve present, I think this should be less of a problem. Does anyone have any experience of this they can share? Thank you Adam..
  8. You certainly can charge whilst the battery is connected (ignition off) and you can definitely connect the positive charger lead to the other end of the main lead where it connects to the starter. The earth lead can connect to any good ground (eg a cylinder head bolt).
  9. I agree with Stude17. Unless you can hear rumbling noises from the crankshaft main bearings, or knocking from a big-end bearing, I would not rush to strip the bottom-end. Try a 15W40 oil, or even a 20W50. It doesn`t cost much to try and those oils will maintain greater viscosity at 100 degrees centigrade than the SAE 30HD will. I would expect oil pressure to reduce with temperature, but is your 5lb reading taken at speed or at idle? If at Idle, I would not be too worried.
  10. edinmass is right. Any truck tyre fitters should be able to do it for you. Take a piece of old carpet or something to avoid scratching the rims. They might not think of that.
  11. Alfa

    le sabre 350cc

    Interesting. Thanks very much. I have a 1966 Sunbeam Tiger which has the Ford 289 V8 with a two barrel carb. It is a standard engine. I find that it runs happily on the 'regular' 95 ron octane fuel, but I am thinking that I will try it on some of the premium stuff when it comes out of winter hibernation. (It is currently receiving a new radiator, hoses and water pump, which were well overdue). I don`t expect that a change in fuel alone will make any appreciable difference, but I envisage that I may be able to run a little more ignition advance on the premium fuel without any pinking, but I will see what happens. Adam..
  12. Alfa

    le sabre 350cc

    If Alf is in the UK, the premium pump petrol is 97 ron. The regular stuff is 95 ron. There is approx. 5-7% ethanol content depending on source. I always buy the regular petrol. Including when I had a 1960 Buick Electra with the 401 engine and a 4 barrel carb. I suppose the premium petrol might let you run a bit more ignition advance. I tend to put in some lead replacement additive when on a long journey where everything might get hot, but valve seat recession does not seem to be a problem in local driving, especially given the tiny annual mileages involved. I would be very interested in your thoughts Rusty. Adam..
  13. I am fairly certain that this will be a light duty van. It is an 1989 GMC 2500, for which I think the gvw is 6,000lbs. So from what you have said, I assume it would have a catalyst fitted.