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1940 limited master cylinder


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Hi everyone,

I'm new to this forum and purchased a 1940 Limted model 81 last spring. I have many small and medium sized projects ahead of me. The car is very nice though. I was hoping on some advice on where to get my master cylinder restored by someone who cares about what they're doing. Any suggestions are very much appreciated. Thanks.

Edited by mschuld (see edit history)
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mschuld, welcome to the wonderfull world of Buicks. What shape is she in and where did you get her. Please post pic's..

Now, down to business. You can get a mastercylinder from "Bob's" or Kanter. Get both their catalogues as you will need them. Also, per the old "sage" Jolly-John (who will jump in here any moment and slap me), BUY A SHOP MANUAL AND PARTS BOOK !!!!! Best $$$$$ you will ever spend. And it will give you the exact part number for all those little parts (that are no longer available) but at least we'll all know what you are after.

Next, join AACA and BCA a.s.a.p. take a pic of your ride and use it as your avatar (we need bigger avatars).

Best regards,

Mike in Colorado

1940 Buick LTD series 90

AACA#994416

BCA# 45728

P.S. Hey Grant, any word on the '40 Century in N.J. ? See the dash ? screwy engine turning job.

Edited by FLYER15015
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Thanks for the fast response and the kind welcome. I wouldn't of thought Kanter would have those, but according to the catalog they do. I removed it last night and will call them this week. The original shop and owners manual came with the car. I also bought the parts books from Cars Inc. It's surprising how many parts are unique to the Limiteds.

I purchased the car from Tom Crook in March. The car was in Len Immkes collection and according to paperwork in the glovebox, spent some time in Kentucky in the early 70's. Supposedly it has 21,000 original miles, which is believable on close inspection. It's had a high quality repaint (Rainier Blue) and some of the chrome has been redone to a high standard. The interior cloth is perfect and appears original. The engine was possibly rebuilt as it has fresh paint, gaskets, etc. and the engine compartment was painted properly.

Problems are leaky radiator (upper tank), leaky gearbox (mostly from selector input shaft), woodgraining needs redone, vacuum leak at intake manifold (that should be fun to fix), and master cylinder of course.

I will post pics soon. I do plan on joining BCA and AACA soon, and I also plan on bugging you guys as much as I can.

I would like to give kudos to Tom Crook, he took alot of time just B.S.'ing with me and has done alot supporting the classic car community. He's truly a class act.

Edited by mschuld (see edit history)
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mschuld,

Now i'm really gonna scare you. While you are under the car, down around the master cylinder area, look a bit forward and check the "clutch equalizer".

It's a cast iron bellcrank that mounts to the frame and bell housing on a set of balls and takes the rod from the clutch pedal and transfers the motion via another rod back to the throwout lever. See if the hole where the rod comes off the clutch pedal down to the bellcrank has "wallered out" the hole in the equalizer's hole.

Mine has, and NOBODY has this part. I'll be making a fabricated weldment as a replacement part this winter. It is applicable only to the 80-90 series cars and I think only to 1940. So the chances of a NOS part are very slim. I've looked.

Best Regards,

Mike in Colorado

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O.K., I checked out what you were referring to, and luckily all of the clutch and brake linkage components are like new and well lubricated with very minimal play. I wonder if there's enough guys out there that might be interested in having a batch of those cast. It might be well worth the investment. I would be willing to pitch in as it does not hurt to have spares.

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mschuld,

Slight correction here. The clutch equalizer P/N 1308581 is common only to 80-90 series cars in 1939-40, per my parts book.

I will pull mine down this winter and check on getting a pattern made of 4130/4140 steel, instead of the old grey iron. Should make it much more wear resistant.

Mike

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If it's not too much trouble, I would be interested in a spare also. If you could let me know when you decide to tear into it that would be appreciated. If you could get it done for the original price of $1.60, heck, I'll take 50 of them:)

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Sorry I haven't had time to respond (stupid job thing). I checked out pics of your car Bigdogdaddy and it looks very nice. What is the knob above the rear view mirror for?

Federal Express is delivering a new Lester WWW tire today to replace the original spare. The spare looks like brand new but it's hard as a rock. Think I'll clean it up and mount a neon clock in the center of it and hang it in the garage.

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  • 2 weeks later...

mschuld,

If you have an antenna and no radio, do you have the "engine turned" radio delete plate in the center of the dash? Pictures please...

1940 radios come up on e-bay every now and then @ somewhere around $250.00.

Also there are 6 and 12 volt conversions that can be installed.

If you remove (unscrew) the interior mirror and one screw below it @ the center of the windshield, see if there is a shielded antenna lead behind it. Goes down thru a hole in the dash.

Mike in Colorado

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My car does not have an antenna, speaker, or radio. It does have the proper delete panel with the "buttons". It would be cool to have the original radio set-up, but wouldn't I have to cut the roof sheet metal to install the antenna assembly? My plan for now is to use a portable CD player and not mess with anything, as I have enough on my plate in regards to getting the car where I want it. My next project is to remove the leaky manifolds and see what's going on with them. I can feel an exhaust leak with my hand at the rear manifold, and I'm sure the intake has a vacuum leak also. Does anyone know if they used spring washers on the manifold studs? If so, what size and specs?

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Mschuld,

You can get an intake/exhaust manifold gasket from several sources such as "Bob,s", or Olson's in WA.

Both the front section and the back section slip into the center section, and 9 times out of 10, that slip joint is distorted to the point that it leaks. There are many discussions here about manifold repair welding/brazing/replacement. On the center section there is a plate (heat riser) that directs exhaust to the carb or down to the pipe. Works on a spiral spring. Please make sure it is loose or locked in the "open" position. I locked mine, with a good spring on the lever @ the rear of the carb.

Also there should be a check ball in the center of your intake under the carb, w/ an elbow and pipe that runs down the side of the block. Drains excess gas out of the manifold, and prevents blowups. Make sure the pipe and passageway are clear and ball is free.

There is a "bellville" washer of sorts that goes on the manifold studs that looks like it was stamped out of 1/8" hot rolled plate. I put new studs in mine that were a bit longet than OEM and don't forget to use "neverseize" on the studs.

Also the big engines interchange somewhat, so if you have to replace the exhaust manifold, a couple of years interchange. Some experts on this need to jump in here.

Best regards,

Mike in Colorado

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It looks like there's a choice between copper and composite on the manifold to head gaskets. I wonder which is best. The plate on my exchanger is siezed in the open position (warm). I will fix this after I tear it apart, but I wonder if keeping it in the open position is o.k. if I'm primarily driving it in warm weather. I checked the drain tube to make sure it wasn't sucking air through it, but still need to make sure the check is functioning properly (good call on your part). I read that graphite sealer is used on those manifold joints, but I'm not familiar with that stuff. I will definetly use anti-sieze on the new studs on the head side, but should you use locktite on the nuts? Also wondering about planing. Do you assemble the intake and exhaust manifolds and plane the entire assembly together? That makes sense to me, but not sure.

Edited by mschuld (see edit history)
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Depending on how pitted your manifold is, you should get away with just the new gasket. On my old 39 Chevy, the head was corroded as well, so I used two manifold gaskets. The gaskets weren't very thick. They were actually for a 6 cylinder Bedford truck engine! Good old GM!

Cheers

Grant

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Mschuld,

I used the composite gasket on mine. Also note the gasket req'd between the intake and exhaust (down below the carb area). It's a must have. I too have my heat riser plate locked in the wide open position. I did not use thread lock on any bolts or nuts, as it will just burn away. I did find some big thick bellville washers for the manifold studs and I used flanged nuts atop those.

Kind of tough to plane a loose 3 piece exhaust manifold. But do clean the head well and get all the old stuff off. I used a razor blade and carb cleaner. Most probable leak area is where they slip together. This has to almost be a press fit, or it will leak. Send pic's of the parts when you have it apart.

I sealed mine @ assembly time with a little bottle of glue that you would use to hold the door gasket in with on your wood stove. Apply generously all around when slipping front and rear sections together. Seems to have worked well so far...

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I originally bought the composite gasket for my car when I replaced the manifolds a few years ago. Last year I noticed an exhaust leak, and this year I replaced those gaskets with the copper ones from Bob's. The composites only lasted a few years, and considering that the car is driven only a few thousand miles each year, they didn't last very long. Go with the copper gaskets.

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I guess the most important parts of re-assembly is assuring the mating surfaces are as flush as possible, the mounting nuts don't back-off (bellevilles) and proper sealing of 3 piece exhaust manifold. I would assume that both gaskets have their positives and negatives, I bet the copper gasket is much thicker and probably better long-term if its installed perfectly, the composite gasket may be a little more forgiving if conditions aren't right but may not be as durable long term. I like your fireplace gasket sealer idea. What is that stuff made of? Also wonder why they made the exhaust manifold 3 pieces.

Oh yeah, got a box of parts from Bob's last night. They ship their stuff really fast, I'm pleasantly surprised. It was nice to see "Made in the USA" on everything. I sent them my master cylinder for re-sleeve/rebuild as they didn't have any in stock (funny that this was the original subject on this thread)

I probably won't take the manifolds apart for another month or so, but I'm going to be on here yabbering about it, asking questions, and sharing pics of what I hope is progress. I sure appreciate all the feedback, you guys have alot of enthusiasm too:)

Go Rick Perry!

Edited by mschuld (see edit history)
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Mschuld,

When you do your manifold project, that would be a good time to:

1. Port and polish the intake manifold. I used 40 grit emery sandwiched between folded over 5/32 welding rod and my trusty electric drill. Got her pretty smooth inside. Might be good for a quarter second in the 1/4 mile, Ha. Ha.

2. Paint the intake manifold the proper color w/ engine paint.

3. Paint the exhaust w/ VHT. I used satin black.

4. Replace all the studs (they are standard) in the head, and the bolts etc.

5. Make sure the carb is seated well. I used high temp RTV.

Just some things to consider since it's going to be apart anyway.

Mike in Colorado

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mschuld,

Depends on what you bought the car for. Mine was in pretty good shape on the outside, so I'm doing a frame on/ rolling restoration, since my intent is to enjoy my "driver".

One thing @ a time, and make it safe first. Cosmetics as we go along.

Mike

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I was just kidding about the ground-up comment, the car is way too nice for that. My goal is to make it as reliable as possible with keeping it original. We would like to be able to do a short tour or two next summer. Cars need exercise, it keeps them healthy my friend.

Edited by mschuld (see edit history)
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