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zipdang

A few days with a Packard

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Reviewing my 1970 CCCA Directory:


3 possibilities.  No body makers listed, but perhaps the last names will jog the original posters memory.    

 

Jack W Eichelberger                                                    

Dayton, OH

1929 Packard, 8, 645, conv coupe. 

 

WIlliam Heil

Cincinnati, OH

1929 Packard, 8, 633, conv coupe.   

 

Brad Hindall

Ada, OH

1929 Packard (no body type listed) 

 

These are the only 3 cars from Ohio in the 1970 CCCA directory that could fit the subject car.     

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)
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I'm of two minds, one the windshield is very radical for a 1929 car, even a full custom, on the other hand I can't imagine the amount of work required to conjure this up from a standard body of any type.

 

Assuming it is real, it is very attractive for that early of a car.

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I'm amazed (and dare I say pleased?) at the puzzle I seem to have presented. I'm afraid I've posted everything I know about the car. The "W.E.Handley" on the envelope and on the back of the photo is the only name I have associated with it. My scan is an accurate rendition of the photo, so no distortion of note. I sure wish I had asked Dad more questions about this car. I was only about 7-8 years old at the time with just a budding interest in unusual cars.

 

I do remember (as seen in the background) that we were having a garage sale and perhaps the folks in the photo were there for that and ended up having the husband/father take the picture, only later to send a copy to my Dad as a thank you. I did a google search of the address on the envelope and it is a very modest house - not what I would have thought for the owner of this car.

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I put the word out to my siblings too see if any of them have anything to add. We'll see...

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In regard to the "modest house" comment, most of the people who collected them in the 1950s and 1960s ... even up to the very early 1970s, were very modest middle-income collectors, and the cars were not really considered works of art like they are today. Many of them were bought for hundreds of dollars and even the absolute best restorations back then would probably not score well if judged today.

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West you are 100% correct.    Back in the 60s I can think of a slightly above average ranch house with J292 sitting in the garage and another a few miles down the road with another Model J (purchased for 10,000 - which was more than the house) and a 540k (purchased for 6500).   All the collectors where middle to upper middle class guys.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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On 12/5/2017 at 7:04 PM, K8096 said:

Reviewing my 1970 CCCA Directory:


3 possibilities.  No body makers listed, but perhaps the last names will jog the original posters memory.    

 

Jack W Eichelberger                                                    

Dayton, OH

1929 Packard, 8, 645, conv coupe. 

 

WIlliam Heil

Cincinnati, OH

1929 Packard, 8, 633, conv coupe.   

 

Brad Hindall

Ada, OH

1929 Packard (no body type listed) 

 

These are the only 3 cars from Ohio in the 1970 CCCA directory that could fit the subject car.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one in Dayton sounds promising, as it is a 645. The one in Cinci is out, as it is a 633.

Here's information about Jack Eichelberger. I hear his name every time I attend the local theater downtown Dayton.

Jack W. and Sally D. Eichelberger Foundation – 2006 was established by Jack and Sally Eichelberger, longtime Oakwood residents, to enhance the legal profession, the arts and the Greater Dayton community through the awarding of grants. Jack Eichelberger was a well-known Dayton attorney and real estate investor.

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14 minutes ago, alsancle said:

West you are 100% correct.    Back in the 60s I can think of a slightly above average ranch house with J292 sitting in the garage and another a few miles down the rode with another Model J (purchased for 10,000 - more than the house) and a 540k (purchased for 6500).   All the collectors where middle to upper middle class guys.

Reminds me of a solid middle-class collector in a western Minnesota town of 350 who had a fair-to-middling condition 16-car garage (former school bus storage building and shop). Inside was a 1934 Bugatti cabriolet, 1939 Delahaye 135 MS, Cadillac V-16, 1938 BMW 328, 1942 Packard town car, among several other Packards and highly collectible postwar pieces.

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LeBaron for 1929 is starting to look like a good guess.  Notice the round step plate on the passenger side rear fender and the over-sized golf bag door on that side.  Also, the molding along the hood through the door then drops lower on the rear of the car.  The windshield has an unusual rounded corner at the bottom.  All of these things seem to depart from Raymond Dietrich's influence.  Anxiously await additional input from folks familiar with 1929 Packards!

 

Tom Hartz

Nashville, Indiana 

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After asking my siblings, I have some more information:

 

From little sister:  No reply yet, but I'll bet she was too young to have any more information.

 

From little brother:  To the best of my knowledge it was actually a Volkswagen kit car with a fuel injected corvette drive train, hydraulic lift/lowrider kit, in-dash espresso machine, and mountain fresh scented lime green fuzzy dice. (A typical little brother response!)

 

From big sister:  We had it because relatives of Dad up in northern Ohio were trying to sell it but were having no luck.  They gave it to Dad to drive around for a while.  It was a 1929.  Silver, with red wheels and accents.

 

From big brother:  I remember:  1929 Packard. One of Dad's relatives owned it and Dad had it to drive and get visibility to try and sell itIt did sell We did go to one car event out in the country somewhere. The rumble seat was NOT restored so the next owner could do something on the car. Uncle? brought it down from Akron/Canton on a flat bed and Dad and I met him at a gas station on I-71 just north of Columbus and drove it in. I recall we had a fuel pump issue while we had it.

 

There are a couple members of that branch of the family nearby, so when I get a chance, I'll ask them.

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It could very well be a Rollston custom body as well, or even Murphy.

Here's a Murphy-bodied car from 1928, with a front-opening door.

1928 Packard.jpg

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2 hours ago, Dave Fields said:

Ohio tags. Someone has old CCCA rosters. I would look there. Must be something in the AACA library.

 

K8096 has already done this. Just look a few posts ahead of yours. Should be the best avenue to determine who/what/where.

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Mr Zipdang, 

 

If you could give me your dad's last name it could help.   I could look up that name in late 1960's - early 1970's CCCA directories and see if there's a match.  Your brother said it was a family member of his who had the car - perhaps that family member had the same last name.    I showed your photo this evening to an old time CCCA guy who knew all the cars in the Akron area in the 1960's and he didn't remember it, nor did he have any pictures of it in his scrap book which is filled with 1950's & 60's photos from car shows.  

 

To the rest of the gang:  As I know it, there are 3 1931 Packard LeBaron conv coupes in existence.  The 1931 model seems to have a very similar door hinge arrangement, but the windshield differs significantly.  It is higher and the base is different.  Are there any 1930 model Packard LeBaron conv coupes known to exist?   Perhaps the subject car is a one off and no other copies were ordered, and then LeBaron resurrected the design and updated it for 1931.                   

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My Dad, Edward J. Hetzel, was not a member of any car clubs. Raising us 5 kids didn't leave anything for old car ownership. However he did love the old ones, Packard especially, and driving this car for just a few days was quite a treat. The family name that may be associated with this car is Halter - cousins to Dad. I just talked with Jim Halter who lives near me and he doesn't recall the Packard from among all the cars his brothers dealt with but it was a time when he was in the service so he wasn't involved.

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Quote

 

I looked in 1968, 69, 70, 71, and 72  CCCA directories under the 2 names you gave in Ohio and there were no listings of either being a member.   My hope was that they listed the car along with the body builder.   

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