Nancy DeWitt

Walt Meyer Auto Museum?

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Hello Nancy

Well darn [expletive deleted] I have been trying to track that truck down for sometime. I believe your car was in a museum in Cortland NY. When sold?? The mans name who had the museum was Rosen. I am from Canada and first heard about the vehicle from car guys on the way to Hershey who had stopped at the museum. Years later while drinking beer in Daytona I met a family member of the museum owner. He gave me some contacts that dead ended and then I saw this thread. Now the car is in Alaska?? This old car business is crazy and connecting the dots is fun. I am going to check out your web site and try and give you a call this computering is hard.

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Back in 1919 there was a Henderson Touring car here in town, a 1915 with serial number 513. Got that info years ago when I went through the registration book and pulled out the cars that were here in town. Bob

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I'd like to make contact with anyone who has old photos taken at Bridgewater, or has a list of cars that were there.  I've been working for several years to learn more about the two Stanleys that were in the collection - so far I haven't found anyone who remembers them.  Someone who took a number of cars after the museum closed in '89 has said he doesn't recall seeing either car, so presumably they left earlier.  The existing photos of the two cars appear to be from the '50s.  If I can get an idea how much later they were still in the collection, it complete the picture just a little bit further.  Feel free to PM me if you wish.

 

Thanks,

 

Kelly

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A 1912  model K- 20 marathon came from  that bridge water Museum  . restored in Texas and now in a private collection in Kentucky!  I have also a K-20 but came from Mr Ted Trice small museum in scennett  New York . now at  .marathon village .com

Edited by Marathon Man (see edit history)

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This 1984 Syracuse newspaper clipping mentions a 1913 Stanley and a mint 1916 Packard in the museum.  Two complete mysteries for the roster keepers.  Does anyone know what happened to either?

1984.jpg

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I believe the "mint condition 1916 Packard" they may be referring to was Ronnie Hall's Blue twin six. The car had been treated to a first class restoration in the late 1960's, was featured in the rose bowl parade and Ronnie kept it spotless.  Mr. Meyer and his wife were close friends with Ronnie and were largely responsible for turning him on to the hobby in his younger years.  When I was a kid he told me he kept it there and then later @ Staley's museum in Norwich as it wasn't until later in life that he was able to build his own big barn also on Rte. 20. I am also pretty darn certain that the bridgewater museum is also how he came across the original 1910 Packard model 30 touring body for the car that recently sold at Bonham's Don C. Boulton sale. Anything that left that museum went through Ronnie and rightfully so- he was an incredibly knowledgeable enthusiast who dedicated his life to preserving important automotive relics. Could the 1918 Pierce they refer to be his old green model 66? That was his Saratoga Springs barn find car-I never got tired of hearing that story. That car was mostly all original and just totally overwhelming as a kid- like standing next to a locomotive! Anyhow, you'll never hear anyone speak ill of Ronald Hall-just a great guy.

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On 6/11/2019 at 3:31 PM, md murray said:

I believe the "mint condition 1916 Packard" they may be referring to was Ronnie Hall's Blue twin six.

This makes good sense.  That was a west coast car, and Ron did bring it up to a very nice condition.  It was probably on loan to the museum, just as the car was on loan to Staley for many years.  Thanks for making this connection. There was another car very similar to Ron's that was in the greater Syracuse area for many years, and I've been working for years to find where that one went.  I'm sure it survives and is on the roster, but can't make the connection (yet).

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Look at Cars For Sale on the AACA Forums.  There is a Packard offered  by Brass is Best that meets you description.  A $250,000 car today..

i checked it an the one for sale is a 1915, sorry.  

Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)

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Ronnie Hall's Packard next went to Dragone Classic Motorcars who had it offered for sale for a little while. The last I saw it popped up about 5+ years ago at an auction down south somewhere (Georgia or Carolina?) and the listing made reference to Hall being a prior owner. The car had been a static display in a small auto museum down there and save for one other Packard it was far and away the nicest thing in the sale. 

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My Dad and I drove out RT20 to Bridgewater one day in 1975. It was one of the few times we both had time off work to do something together. That post card on Ebay has to be close to the front door. I remember the visit well. And the chicken wire. I was like a collection of all the back row stuff from seedy car lots. Most of the cars were pretty rough but I loved the place. A couple of real nice ones stood out.

There was a big rack of Floyd Clymer books up front for souvenirs. I bought a reprint of the 1940 Buick prestige brochure, black and white only. Still have it.

 

Prior to 1974 I had returned to my Grandfather's tire and car business after the Navy. We were wholesaling around Rochester and running to the Dansville auction. I became good friends with Clarence Sharp and Ernie LaPort, long time used car dealers on the old Lyell Avenue strip where the $200 and $300 cars were front row stuff. Clarence is the man who owned the Selden that Bob took to Pebble Beach. I spent a few afternoons hitting the bars in Clarence's Model T touring. He'd take a glycerine tablet when he needed and I would crank the car because of his bad heart, didn't keep him from flirting with all the girls though, my girlfriend included!

That museum was an incarnation of Clarence and Ernie's lives. And it was certainly far from pretentious. I really enjoyed that trip. It is nice this topic surfaced to refresh the memories.

 

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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I was given a copy of the most admirable catalogue for the auction of Alex Kennedy Miller's collection in Vermont by an associate of the auction company.   I am sure there was a Henderson car in that auction, which indicates that AKM had a high opinion of it.   In 1980 , after Auburn,  I visited Ernie and Ruth Toth;  before I travelled to Springfield  Vermont to accompany Morris and Libby Burrows on the Glidden in their 1914 Mercer 35-O roadster.  Morris' opinion of AKM was the square root of minus one, and there was no way he would assist or encourage me to visit him.  To use our bush metaphor, if you shook hands with him you might need to count your fingers.  By contrast, Stutz people like Paul Freehill and Ernie Toth seemed to have reasonable regard and working relationship with him.   Ernie advised taking a container of icecream if I had the opportunity to visit him, because he was very partial to that.    AK was obviously a very knowledgible and versatile person.  Imagine repairing fuselage damage  of a downed aeroplane during the war to fly it home in winter by patching the hole(s)? with canvass and water.  I am eccentric enough myself that I would have enjoyed meeting him; but I never had the chance.      In relation to your car with a Rochester Duesenberg engine,  I had a problem with rust pitting of the water pump shaft of my Roamer, even though the car has only ever done 14,000 miles.    You lose the timing when you have to do anything about that.   I rebuild that with a Metco  grindable stainless steel sprayed metal coating.   I have explained this in technical posts in the past.  There is also a problem with the stub water connection into the cylinder block.  It is very thin wall thickness,  and you cannot see how it is made and fitted.   It is threaded on a slight taper.  I machined a new one out of a free- machining grade bar stock, which has sulphur content.    To cheat the taper fit of the thread I cut it parallel the correct pitch, then shaved it to correct taper  by running it in the lathe and tapering the thread with a thread file , hand-held, with cutting lube. 

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I don't know if this is the one Bob recalls in or near Ridgefield, CT years ago, but this is what Miller's Henderson looked like the year after the auction, on display at Bennington, VT.  I believe it was the first of all the cars auctioned off, to be up and running and back on the road.

Henderson.jpg

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