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B1rdman

Lincoln overdrive correct oil, tranny and overdrive

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I was reading the book on my 1947 Lincoln overdrive.

And i found in there never to use the smelly oil used in a rearend i think it

is hypoid..

It says that you should use a good 50 weight oil in tranny and overdrive as

they share a common oil, connected together..

I went to grease and go for a change. He said what came out looked

like thick choclate milk. Filled it back with 50 weight Valvoline.

Was amazed at the change, before i would raise foot from gas peddle,

it would go into overdrive,, but after the change is a smooth shift

to overdrive evertime.

gene

what are you using in tranny and overdrive ???

post-61700-143138143215_thumb.jpg

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While 50 wt. motor oil and 90 wt gear oil are about the same viscosity the Motor oil lacks the extreme presure additives needed for gears. Suggest you use 85#-90 gear oil or if you live in a warm climate the 85-140 gear oil would work. I'd dump that 50 motor oil, if thats what you have in it, at first chance. I have never seen a lub chart/ recomendation for one of these cars that didn't specify 90 wt. gear oil?

Edited by peecher (see edit history)

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I totally agree with Peecher. Here in Texas where it's HOT, I use 140w gear oil in the transmission and rear axle.

Here's a factory lube chart for the 1939 Lincoln Zephyr, copied from the "Reference Manual". I don't have a later manual, but they're all pretty much alike since there weren't many mechanical changes between 1938 and 1948.

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I am sure you have more experiounce than me.

But here is a direct quote from the Borg Warner manual

.

D The manufacturer of the overdrive unit recommends only straight mineral oil, not the "EP"

or extreme pressure type of lubricant. which are unecessary for the overdrive, and may

contain ingredients that will corrode or otherwise damage the parts or form sludge or contain

solid matter in suspensionwhich may stop the oil passages to the pinion bearing, resulting in serious and expensive damage to the unit. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES MUST A LUBRICANT OF THE HYPOID AXLE TYPE BE USED IN THE OVERDRIVE.

the most satisfactory all-around lubricant for the overdrive is SAE No 40 engine oil of a good grade. for extremely hard driving in hot climates SAE No 50 may be used. straight minerial oils

of the transmission type SAE 80 for all around use, or No 90 for hard sriving in hot climates will also be satisfactory

Edited by B1rdman
wrong number (see edit history)

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Remember, the recomendation is for the Overdrive itself. Your OD shares oil with the transmission so you need oil that is compatiable with both, hence the gear oil ( not hypoid) is recommended . Some early types of Borge-Warner Overdrives did not share common oil supply with the manual transmission so the oil recommendation from B-W is for those units.

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The last sentence on page 19 of the "old car manual project" says it all. Checked the 1950 issue of Motor's Manual and all makes listed recomend 80 to 140 gear oil for their transmissions with or without overdrive depending on make and seasonal conditions. I think the one exception was Nash and they recomended 70wt summer and 50 wt winter. One make , Hudson, even recomemded 90 ep oil! The '48 Lincoln operator's manual recomends mild ep 90 wt. summer and mild ep 80 winter for both the transmission and overdrive.

The modern 80-140 gear oil will provide superior all weather lubrication for these rigs.

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