Freoway

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About Freoway

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    Junior Member
  • Birthday 09/20/1961

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  • Biography
    '35 Chev Master, '36 Ford Roadster, '40 Ford Pickup, '57 TBird, '63 Pontiac Grand Prix, '63 Daimler Dart
  1. Hi. I originally placed this query in the general technical section rather than under pre-War Buick. I've got a '42 Buick fastback sedan in which I replaced the diff's outer bearings and seals. I removed the diff assembly and refitted it (I didn't need to as it turned out, but that's another story), but am now unsure about how to torque up the notched, threaded adjusters that pull up to the inner bearings toward axle ends. And of course the workshop manual says there are special tools for doing the job (which noone has). The diff appeared in good shape, with minimal backlash and no discernable whines, wear, etc. Is there a simple way to torque up the notched carrier adjuster without special tools? Finding the free position is pretty difficult and I'm attempting to move the adjusters with a combination of screwdrivers (a little agricultural I know!). Is it possible to load up the bearings too much, given that I don't have any heavy torque/leverage tools? Cheers, Lloyd
  2. Thanks Don. Never got into the safe cracking business, but I'll blow on my fingers and give them a tweak. There's hopefully some sensitivity left in my fingers.
  3. Thanks Don. My manual said the same. It's just hard to work out the point where I should count the 2 1/2 notches. The manual says from the "free position", but that's very hard to determine. Any clues?
  4. Hi. I'll admit to being no diff specialist up front. I've got a '42 Buick fastback sedan in which I replaced bearings and seals. I removed the diff assembly and refitted it, but am now unsure about how to torque up the carrier bearings on the inner axle ends. And of course the workshop manual says there are special tools for doing the job which noone has. The diff appeared in good shape, with minimal backlash and no discernable whines, wear, etc. Is there a simple way to torque up the notched carrier adjuster without special tools? Cheers, Lloyd
  5. Thanks. That makes sense. It has a 02D code, which makes it a 1963 389 with 4 speed, 1x4V. The tri-power option was obviously added on by someone else. I see you've got a '32 Ford truck. I recently bought a '40 Ford pickup (a rare right-hand drive). Those old flatheads are fun. Cheers, Lloyd
  6. Hi folks. I have a '63 Grand Prix I purchased recently. I'm trying to determine exactly which motor I have. The engine has been out of the car and rebuilt, so I'm not sure if it's original or not. My engine code is: 608356 YT. I understand the six numbers are the engine numbers. The YT means different things for different cars, but that most Y's are auto's. I have tried to read my casting number, but it's pretty difficult. I'll attach a pic. There's a GM1 as one would expect and six numbers underneath it. I'm not sure about the first and third digits. It looks like 648680. But I'm not sure. Can anyone help and possibly tell me what I've got? Cheers, Lloyd
  7. Thanks for the info. I've sent him another email (my 5th or 6th). If he doesn't respond, I'll call him. I'm hoping he'll do the right thing by me.
  8. Thanks guys. Really appreciated. The stuff up with the other company I used has put me back a few months. Nothing more frustrating than sitting around waiting for parts to arrive, only to find they're in AUSTRIA!! Pretty funny I guess (except for the money). Cheers, Lloyd
  9. Thanks for the info. I'll check them out. Cheers, Lloyd
  10. I had a '59 Dodge Coronet for the last 8 years. Only sold it a few months ago. It was dripping with chrome. It was a great car for the period. I actually went to check out a '66 GTO convertible at this car yard, but spotted this Grand Prix. The GTO was nothing much to look at in the flesh (hadn't been well treated), but the GP was a great looking car. The interior is amazing for the time. Not sure how long I'll keep it as I've got too many to keep me busy. Restoring a few old 30's/40's cars. The GP just needs an idler arm and it'll be on full registration. That's the part I was waiting for from the California Pontiac Restoration guy. Cheers, Lloyd
  11. I tried ringing him a week or so ago. His answering machine said that the business was closed and was moving to new premises and that they would be back in business by November 2. Maybe things aren't going to plan. Either way. I haven't been treated well. I'll try him again soon. Cheers, Lloyd
  12. Hi all. I'm new to the forum. I have a few older cars, the youngest of them being a '63 Grand Prix - a car that I've found to be surprisingly well built. I bought it from a dealer in Concorde, CA (just outside of San Fran). It turned out to be a much better car than I'd realised. Can anyone recommend someone who supplies parts for these cars? I've ordered a few parts this year from California Pontiac Restorations - dealing with a guy called Nathaniel, but I got my fingers burnt. They supplied a few parts for me, but then mistakenly sent some parts to Austria instead of Australia. He now refuses to answer any of my emails. Very disappointing, and a wad of money that I have to consider lost. Cheers, Lloyd