Jump to content

Engine options


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi folks <BR>Well the 350 I was going to rebild and install into my 66 skylark turned up having 2 cracks in the block so I'm on the search for other options I have located 3 different engines and would like your opinion on them <BR>1 1964 425 2X4bbl out of a riviara<BR>2 1966 455 out of a riviara<BR>3 1975 455 car unknown<BR>will any of these work and what problums would I have with installation<BR>which engine would you recommend<BR>thanks in advance for all your help<P>Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi, I'm in the process of finishing up changing out my cracked 300 and putting in a 71 455. Drops right in, just get the new frame pads and brackets from postons. I also switched the ST300 for a 200-4r and that required moveing the transmission cross members brackets back. This will now require a new driveshaft. The 67 Skylark has a 2 piece driveshaft which I have been told will not hold up to the extra touque. Good luck! Jock

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all the 1966 Riv didn't have a 455. It was a 425 and I think an optional 401 (or the other way around smile.gif" border="0) The 75 455 is not the best 455 but not bad, I would go with the 455. I am a real nailhead nut, but the parts required to install the 425 would be a bunch, and hard to find. smile.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go withthe 455, as MartinSr said, too many special parts for the nailhead to go in a skylark.<P>Your driveshaft is one-piece, but has a rubber damper in the end. It should be fine unless you are drag racing, and in that case put in a driveshaft loop. Many hi-perf factory cars came with this type of driveshaft. I wouldn't use one if you have one built, but in your application it should be OK.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adam,<P>You are talking about 35 year old rubber and a shaft with 35 years of fatigue. Many big block cars came with them, but they were not fatigued or rotten from the factory. When they split, it happens at the back by the dampener, not in the front where a safety loop would be. The remaining one foot piece stays attached to yoke on the rear and whips around under there damaging anything in its path until you stop. I guess you could trust it, but from experience I would not. <P>You could look for a four speed shaft as they were one piece and had no dampener. If anything, it would be too long and would need to be cut down and balanced. You could also have a new one made cheaper than you think. I think it's just good insurance and certainly no place to cut corners with an old worn shaft.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Folks<BR>Thanks for all the info I bought the 455<BR>it came with a th400 trans so I think I will need to cut the driveshaft and relocate the crossmember <BR>This motor looks good inside only needing a hone jobe and new rings and freshen up the heads would it be possible to install the pistons and cam from a 70 stage 1 and achive <BR>approx the same HP and performance or are the newer 455's different<P>Thanks for all your help<P>Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe that '70 was the first year for the 455. The previous years had 430's. Cam, pistons, valves and maybe some port work will make it haul ass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

on that th400. make sure that you use the short tail shaft on that tranny and not the long tail shaft. i had a long tail shaft in my 72 skylark and the engine didn't sit right. also the angle of the drive shaft is too great and i lost my rebuilt tranny. <P>just something to think about...see what other people think.<P>john

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yes. the 455 and th400 is a great combo. the later 75 model should come with hei and hardened valve seats. should make for a GREAT street car in the relatively light skylark.<P>the th400 is considerably larger than your st300. you may have to dent the floor to get it to fit, or switch to a 200-4r, which is smaller, and has a fourth gear.<P>i would not switch the pistons. just deck the heads and block a little, raise the compression up to 9:1 or so, run a mild cam, and you are all set. the 70 model's compression is really too high to run on pump gas.<P>then, chuck your driveshaft, and get a single piece unit made.<P>allan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Guys<BR>Thanks for the info the 455 is going to the machine shop tomarrow this is a low budget rebuild so decking the block and heads and larger valves may be out of the budget for now. I'm thinking 9.5-1 pistons stage1 or similar cam fresh bearings and a valve job<BR>are there any other low dollar tricks out there that would help also what kind of horsepower and torque do you think it will have with this combination?<BR>again thanks for all the help this forum is great<P>Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

posted 04-20-2001 06:10 PM <BR>--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<BR>"Adam,<BR>You are talking about 35 year old rubber and a shaft with 35 years of fatigue. Many big block cars came with them, but they were not fatigued or rotten from the factory. When they split, it happens at the back by the dampener, not in the front where a safety loop would be." <BR> <P>Steve, you are correct about the whipping part. As for old and rotting parts, careful inspection should tell you that. Do you replace every harmonic balancer on every car that is over 10 years old? Doubtful.<BR> You may have a lot more experience than I do, I don't know, but I've yet to see it happen and have done this stuff for a while myself. Like anything else, there is judgement involved. If it were a 12 sec car to run slicks, I would tend to agree with you. The guy is already on a budget and isn't trying to build a race-car. Sure it's possible to happen, but the odds are slim if his shaft is in average condition. If he's going to go out and buy another one, sure he should look for a solid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

also, buy grooved cam-bearings from TA Performance. <P>Be VERY careful to inspect and set up your oil pump correctly. stay away from the hi-volume kits. Oiling problems are the #1 death to the 455. Follow your Buick manual or the info on <A HREF="http://WWW.taperformance.com" TARGET=_blank>WWW.taperformance.com</A> and you should be fine. <P>Use the hypereutectic pistons for your application. If your bore is good, the pistons probably are too (inspect them carefully), so spend the piston money on having it zero-decked and look for some earlier heads to up the compression. <P>The '75 heads are terrible from that stand point but I am told that they will let a 455 run on "mule [censored]" if that is your fuel requirement. You will be able to get plenty of power and surprising economy from your car. I got 15 mpg HWY with 3.36 gears and a wild cammed 430.<P>HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Folks <BR>Great info the 455 will be back next week<BR>9-1 pistons mild crane cam and stock valve job my next question is what carb do you recomend and what cfm I dont have the stocker<BR>all I have now is a stock quadrajet from a 68 350 and I think this would be to small<BR>I have always liked the carter afb but I dont think they make one to fit the stock intake<BR>any and all suggestions are appritiated<P>Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adam,<P>Let me try to help you with this one more time. Then do as you will. The harmonic balancer is not subject to the same amount of instant load as the drive shaft. When was the last time you dropped your harmonic balancer in drive and had it move the whole car instantly. Year in and year out, these loads fatigue the rubber and metal in the shaft. The point of the rubber in the shaft was to absorb some of shock of that load. The point of the rubber in the balancer is to help distribute vibrations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm still using my Q-Jet, but I plan on eventually putting on an Edelbrock 1411, 750cfm. My buddy has an Edelbrock on his truck and really likes it. I can attest to the load roar it puts out at WOT.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the edelbrock carb is ok, but it is now where near the 71-73 q-jets that came on the 455s. these Q-jets can be modified, they can be adjusted to suit any purpose, and are cheap to find. i think that you should go with the Q-jet. i had a edelbrock and it wasn't near as good as the Q-jet i now run.<P>john

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Steve, I will continue to do what has been successful in the past for myself and many others. I'm glad we can agree to disagree.<P>If you haven't bought a cam yet, I would suggest using one from a Bucik specialist. the prices aren't that different and they are not a chevy grind transferred to a Buick cam blank. (make more power/economy)<P>Go with the Q-jet off of any BB Buick (preferably the '72-up). The economy and throttle response will be better than with an Edelbrock, or more correctly, AFB.<P>Ask the person doing your heads to back-cut the valves at 30 degrees. It's cheap performance and will give you several CFM flow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just in case 66skylark was wondering, the 71-73 Q-jets flow 800 cfm stock and they can be modified from there. they are truely superior. <P>john wink.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...