Jmsanch

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About Jmsanch

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  1. 40s Deluxe no spark

    For what it’s worth and I’m not 100% sure is the best way to verify. If I switch my battery charger to 6v the starter won’t even turn. Just hear a hum. As I increase the voltage everything starts to work correctly.
  2. 40s Deluxe no spark

    Wow lots of great suggestions everyone thanks. Ok I'm to start looking at the distributor for any issues suggested above. I'm old enough to remember a car with a distributor system, but young enough not to ever work on one. I take that back Senior year of HS late 90s Auto Tech class. Ok well thats why I took on a project like this. Back tracking a bit, I know I get voltage to the coil, but is there a way to safetly verify output from the coil, like connecting a spark plug to the end of the wire coming off the coil and grounding it out. Doesn't the distributor just set the voltage to the individual spark plugs in time with the engine? Or do I need the condenser to complete the circuit/spark? I found some information on how to test the coil with a multimeter outside of the car, so I might try that too. I think a refresher youtube video may be in order.
  3. 40s Deluxe no spark

    Ok here is a pic of the black box, and you are correct it is a regulator. I included a pic of the distributor, not sure if that helps any
  4. 40s Deluxe no spark

    Yes its a 1940 Pontiac deluxe, engine is a straight 8. The owner says he always used a 12v battery and never had a problem and at least during his ownership since the 70s has not updated to 12V himself. So i guess I can assume its a 12v system, and I thought something stepped voltage down to 6v for coil clearly I'm wrong. I still have the coil that was connected, which looks old and doesn't say anywhere what voltage it is. So I suppose at this point its safe to assume its a 12v system, and I need to upgrade to 12v coil. Also supporting this is if I connect an external power source, and give it 6 volts the starter barley moves. As far as distributor goes I'll need to find out what the point gap is supposed to be for this engine. I was told this engine ran when it was parked, and hasn't been touched since. As far as cables go we replaced the dist housing ground wire, and I will check continuity of the the coil to the dist cap tonight. Visually looks in pretty good condition, but looks can be deceiving. Finally, there is black box which I think is a transformer, is for 6v accessories in the car? Let me know if i give you enough info, I can provide pics as well.
  5. I figured I would at least introduce this project, as it goes well beyond no spark. Not a car mechanic, mostly work on snowmobile, 4 wheelers etc. I've always wanted to work on an old car, and admittingly this car is a little older then I would like to have started with. Nevertheless, i jumped at the opportunity fast forward a few months and here I am. I was told car sat for 10 years to find out when he dropped car off at my house it was more like 31 years. Given how long it sat i let the cylinders soak in oil for a while. The engine wasn't locked up, I just wanted to be cautious. So after a new battery engine spins just fine, compression was low but I sourced a NOS head gasket to replace old gasket. So which brings me to my original issue. I'm fairly certain it had the original coil, and we didn't get spark originally. Confirmed 12v to the original coil. Replaced the coil and again 12 volts to the coil, and no spark. So I tried isolating where the issue could be. Obviously I knew had 12v to the coil, but I wasn't sure the easiest and safest way to test voltage out of the coil. Thought we could plug a sparkplug directly into the wire coming off the coil ground it out and hope for spark. No luck. I did open the distributor cap, and it was really clean. Nothing looked burnt up, corroded or dirty. Any suggestions on how to test the coil output?