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What is this engine?


AVS619
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Hi Tom

That looks very much like the parts to a Sears or Holsman engine. Do you have pictures of the rest of it? The spring loaded valve is an atmospheric valve. This is the intake valve. It is not a pump. I need a sears motor about 2 months ago, but traded my car for a T as I couldn't find a motor....

Stuart

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Hello and thank you all for responding to me query about this engine. It is not a Sears as I have a 1909 Sears Model H and this engine looks nothing like the one in the Sears. The atmospheric valve is a clue. Anyway, here are a few more photos. The mounting bracket might also be a clue. Any additional guesses now? Thanks, Tom

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: AVS619</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It is not a Sears as I have a 1909 Sears Model H and this engine looks nothing like the one in the Sears.</div></div>

You are right. It is not a Sears. Remember though that there were two totally different engines for the Sears. The early engine had radial fins on the head and two cams, just like this engine. The other distinctive and strange feature of the early Sears engine was that the cylinders were not offset and the rods were bent to meet the crank journals.

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Hi,

The engine in the first Sears pictures looks very much like the one that I had with my Sears. I wish I had seen this picture before as I may have kept it. Continental made a 2 cylinder opposed engine similiar to the one in question and the one shown in the first sears picture. It had an open flywheel which had continental and serial numbers, etc. I've seen a drawing of this engine, but not a real one. I want to say it was used in a Holsman.

Stuart

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Hello sdbraverman! Attached is the photo of the engine in my 1909 Sears. The plate on top of the crankcase is obviously not orginal, must be a story behind that. I am leaning more and more to the engine I just got being a Holsman. Any other opinions? Does anyone need it? Tom

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The "container" as you call it is an oiler. It is belt-driven and supplies oil to all the critical spots. You can see the sight glass to determine the level. The four brass doo dads pump up and down as the car runs. By turning the nuts, the flow rate can be adjusted. The Sears uses a total loss system, and the oil eventually leaks out. The shiny clean engine in KC's picture probably doesn't run much. The oily mess in my picture runs all the time. After I went through it, I reassembled it with all new gaskets, and it still drools oil all over the place. The cylindrical thing on top of the later engine is a breather, or as I call it the oil sprayer.

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