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Packard gas mileage.


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On a recent road trip of about 200 miles I calculated that my 1947 Super Clipper averaged about 17 miles per US gallon. The car was driven a pretty steady 55-60 miles per hour in overdrive. I had expected slightly better perhaps in the 19-20 mpg range as some articles on this model have suggested. I am not disappointed considering the weight of the car and the 356" engine but I am wondering what kind of gas mileage others are getting with their Packards on highway trips. If this can be improved I would appreciate advise since gas is running at about $5 a gallon here! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Clipper !

That is GREAT gas mileage for a 356 ! That 20 mpg you referred to sounds about right for the "120" (much smaller displacement and lower powered "short nose" Clippers. </div></div>

Well I'll be putting another 400 miles on her this weekend so I will check it aagain and keep my fingers crossed that it will be at least as good.

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I haven't had a chance to check the mileage on my 1940 Super Eight, yet, but during my test drives down the freeway at 70mph (w/overdrive), it sure feels like it is "loafing." I'll be taking it to Indianapolis in a couple of weeks, so I'll be able to report what kind of mileage it gets on the road.

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West, I will be interested in knowing. The Packard fought a very high head/cross wind on the way to the car show in Barnum MN and i was shocked that it only got about 12 MPG. On the return trip the wind was mostly calm and I calculated about 17mpg again.

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Hey Dave - stop worrying about it ! All you have demonstrated - is the obvious - the faster you go (and knowing how nice a "356" is to drive "at speed" in over-drive I sure cant blame you...!) the more significance the relative wind has.

I am not surprised at EITHER of your two figures - my suspicion is your "356" is running just fine.

I hope you arent making the mistake of trying to compare your own "356"'s mileage, with the figures from the old MOBLIGAS ECONOMY RUN figures. My recollection is that no-one ever ran a "356" in that competition - they were all "small" engined Packards. And, if memory serves, they pumped the tires up real hard, and backed the brake shoes way off...stuff like that.

I understand with this new format, you can post photos. Love to see some interior shots - been a long time since I had the pleasure of monkeying around with a "356" Clipper.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 6686L</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Hey Dave - stop worrying about it ! All you have demonstrated - is the obvious - the faster you go (and knowing how nice a "356" is to drive "at speed" in over-drive I sure cant blame you...!) the more significance the relative wind has.

I am not surprised at EITHER of your two figures - my suspicion is your "356" is running just fine.

I understand with this new format, you can post photos. Love to see some interior shots - been a long time since I had the pleasure of monkeying around with a "356" Clipper.</div></div>

Peter, I am not so much worried as I am curious compared to what I have read and what others are getting. On a side note I understand that the overdrive equipped Packards had a 4:11 axle ratio. I have not been able to find any reference to what the axle ratio would be equivalent to in overdrive. I am guessing about 3.50:1. What do you think it would be? I am also guessing it is running at about 1800-2000r.p.m. at 60 m.p.h. since it seems to run very quiet at that speed which is in the r.p.m. range of maximum torque.

When I figure out the new improved format I can post a few Peter. Thanks for asking!

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Hi gain Dave !

RE : your question about "final drive" ratios. My recollection (someone who knows more about this will hopefully help us out) is that the gearing of your over-drive is approx. .72%, or .72 x 4.11 = 2.95. Yes, your "math" is correct, and explains why the "356" is such a nice car at speed.

Looking foward to those photos - I havn't driven a "356" since the mid 1950's !

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I had suspected that the ratio was higher with cars with overdrive, as mine without being engaged is really winding out at 50mph, but with o.d., at 70mph it almost seems like it's loafing. On my dad's car without overdrive, he can go 65-70 and it seems about normal, although not "loafing".

On the other hand, I talked to Marshall Katz about his 1940 limousine, and he says that his car has both overdrive AND a lower gear ratio number. I asked him if the o.d. was added later on, and he seemed to think it was originally delivered that way. I suspect that (at least on Senior cars) a buyer could have ordered it the way he wanted, but standard fare would have been the higher number if o.d. was ordered.

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