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High Speed Gears -- Installation


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Hello --

I am thinking of installing a set of Phil Bray's high speed ring and pinion gears into my

1932 Packard. I know that installation of these is a precision operation and not something for the

shade-tree mechanic.

Does anyone know of an exerienced man in the northeast who I could inquire to? I live near Albany and

would like to find someone within 100 miles or so.

I can remove the differential and bring it to whomever can do the set-up.

On the other hand, has anyone done this themselves? Just how difficult is it? Should I try it

myself? I've rebuilt a coule of engines, so I'm a little better than shade-tree.

--Scott

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setting up the "pre-load" on hypoid gear-sets is something I would NEVER attempt myself, and I do have a bit of experience with things mechanical in general, and things Packard in particular....!

There is no "second chance" to get it right. You get it EXACTLY right the first time, or you destroy the gears. No "iffs" or "butts"...it is THAT critical.

Did you call Turnquist's shop; he may have some ideas for you.

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regarding gear change

Not sure I understnd correctly. Are you saying the gear you are looking at is a 4:11 ratio ? I hope you are mistaken. The only " re-pro" gear sets I am aware of, that will fit your differential, are 3:58, and even THAT isn't "low" (numerically high enough) to really enjoy your car on today's roads. I have a ratio of 3.23, and a spare gear set that is 3:08, which makes for MUCH more pleasant driving.

Rather than go to the trouble & expense of having someone monkey around with that differential, why not buy one of the after-market overdrives. Yes, you will have to use some ingenuity in mounting it ( fabricating a cross-member, and getting a drive-shaft shop to cut and section your drive shafts). But this is something any well-equipped shop can handle. And you will be MUCH happier with the much greater flexibility.

You'd still have your stock "parade" gears for snappy performance around town. Your final drive ratio, stock, in most Packards of that year was 4:69 or 4:41, which is just fine for under 40 mph driving.

With the typical 70 per cent reduction in any of the modern over-drives, you'd have a final drive of 3:08, which would give you comfortable, economical low rpm cruising at 60-70 mph. Once you get past Packards of the mid 1920's, Packard had EXCELLENT brakes - certain not the stopping distances of today's fat tired disc brake cars, but more than adequate if you leave a reasonable following distance and dont get TOO carried away with the marvelous handling and performance your car is capable of.

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Although I've not done anything in the way of gearing changes to my 34 Eight, I've studied the matter and spoken with many, many folks about it. I agree that the overdrive option is far more flexible and preferred. Plus, if you've got the (standard) Eight (320 engine) or the 37-39 Super Eight, I think you'll find 3.58 gears far too tall for the heavier body styles. I believe Packard did offer (at least in 1934) a 4.07 in the lightest body styles and this is probably about as far as one can go and keep good driveability and from having to downshift on every little long upgrade. I think the situation might well be quite different with the Super 8 (385) engine, and certainly with the Twelve. Again, not based on personal experience, just what I've gleaned from many conversations on this topic.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Although I've not done anything in the way of gearing changes to my 34 Eight, I've studied the matter and spoken with many, many folks about it. I agree that the overdrive option is far more flexible and preferred. Plus, if you've got the (standard) Eight (320 engine) or the 37-39 Super Eight, I think you'll find 3.58 gears far too tall for the heavier body styles. I believe Packard did offer (at least in 1934) a 4.07 in the lightest body styles and this is probably about as far as one can go and keep good driveability and from having to downshift on every little long upgrade. I think the situation might well be quite different with the Super 8 (385) engine, and certainly with the Twelve. Again, not based on personal experience, just what I've gleaned from many conversations on this topic. </div></div>

The one complaint I've heard about the overdrives is the noise. This is second hand info I'me getting.

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I have a Phil Bray's high speed rear end in my 1933 Packard Twelve Convertible Sedan. It is numerically identical to what Packard offered when the car was new. Some books refer to it as 4.06:1 and some call it 4.07:1, take your pick. I've driven the Twelve with the high speed rearend almost seven thousand miles. It is quiet, powerful and quite pleasing. About fifteen years ago you could have bought a 3.58: 1 (or there about)rearend. They are no longer offered.

I also have a 1932 Cadillac V8 and a 1934 Packard Super Eight, both have Borg Warner overdrive units. These allow you to maintain the same rearend. This means there is no reduction in acceleration, yet have a higher cruising speed. It is considerably quieter rather than noisier.

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