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UglyKillerLee

Henry Austin Clark Jr. Auto Collection?

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Skip, Thank you for posting the photo of the exLudington Type 59 Bugatti, I never knew Bob Sutherland later owned it. I was the guy that removed the fenders when I was at Vintage Auto, they were very well made and matched the factory tail section design. The car is restored and in England now, there was a feature on it in one of the UK publications with in the last two years.

Yes, those fenders are beautifully made. Let me ask you an important question: I see from photos in the Ken Purdy article in Sports Cars Illustrated that the fenders were seamed and riveted, and the rear fenders appear to have a metal plate closing off the underside. Further, can you tell me the inside color of the fenders? They appear to be flat, unpainted aluminum. Please PM me at sjordan47@comcast.net

59124rearfender.png

Here's a brief overview from the International Bugatti Register, with photos as it appears today.

59124IBRinfo.png

[sorry to hijack Mr. Clark's thread. We now return you to the regularly scheduled programming]

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The Seal Cove Auto Museum, located on Mount Desert Island in Maine, displays two of Henry Austin Clark Jr's automobiles; a 1912 Thomas Flyer and the Elisha Cutler 1904 Knox.

The Thomas Flyer is owned today by the Richard Paine Jr. Automobile Charitable Trust and is on permanent display at the Seal Cove Auto Museum, founded by Richard Paine Jr. in the 1960s. The Trust’s Thomas Flyer was found in a barn on Long Island by Henry Austin Clark Jr., then was sold to Lester Cutting, then sold to Ken Rohl, a judge in Long Island, who sold it to Dr. Sam Scher.... Richard Paine purched the entire Dr. Scher collection for his museum.

The Knox is owned by the Seal Cove Auto Museum. We verified the automobile’s provenance when our volunteer group, the ‘Tuesday Tinkerers,’ found its registration hidden under the seat… Henrietta H. Clark, Henry Austin’s wife. Clark's son, Henry, further verified the family’s ownership when he visited the Museum in 2010.

(The Museum also owns over 100,000 post cards produced by Henry Ausin Clark, Jr., in the 1970s). The photos of the Knox and Thomas Flyer are taken from the original Long Island Automobile Museum post cards and, happy to say, the cars look the same today. You can see the Knox in a short film clip on You Tube, "50 Years of Progress featuring Henry Austin Clark Jr." The Knox runs well and was demonstrated at the Seal Cove Auto Museum during the 2010 season.

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I just stumbled on this thread, don't know why I didn't see it before. I just became the proud owner of a 1910 EMF touring that was part of Henry Austin Clark's collection. I've had it all of about a month and I just love the car. I bought it from Ludwig Gocek in Nazareth PA and can't say enough about it. I have copies of the titles from Clark right through til now. Bob, if you are coming to Rhinebeck for the Sunday show, you can see it there. Look me up....

Frank

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Quote from automuseum:

The Knox is owned by the Seal Cove Auto Museum. We verified the automobile’s provenance when our volunteer group, the ‘Tuesday Tinkerers,’ found its registration hidden under the seat… Henrietta H. Clark, Henry Austin’s wife. Clark's son, Henry, further verified the family’s ownership when he visited the Museum in 2010

Henry's wife's name was Walleta. He always called her "Wally"

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I seem to remember the Knox when it was here on Long Island. I always wondered where it went. I saw that car in the late '50s at Roosevelt Raceway at an antique car meet. If it's the same car, it was referred to as a Knox Waterless. I hope it's the same car.

At that meet, all the vintage cars ran around the race track in a parade. I was there with my '24 Ford T coupe.

Rog

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Hi Nancy and all,,,Hope i can help,,but this area could be problems,,,as my recollection is going to predate a lot,,,,,Who has the VIM truck,,,it is [ was] thought that there was only one left,,,I hve always wonderd where it went,,the spot where it was in CANESSA's Junk yard AYER <mass,,[home ft="" devens]]was="" bare,in="" spring??="" along="" fence="" you="" enterd,,,and="" next="" spot="" mack="" pup,,,the="" stand="" by,,wilson="" s="" yard,concord,ma,="" ,,had="" no="" starter,,never="" did,,,but="" hay="" lumber="" deliverd="" all="" war,,,so="" think="" 1948--49,,someone="" said="" someone="" from="" new="" york="" bought="" ,,,er,,,em,,,likely="" story,,,ive="" em="" all,,,,it="" screen="" side="" delivery="" body,,,bear="" mind="" 13="" time,,,,but="" still="" saving="" car,,my="" 4cyl="" dodge="" fine="" woods="" roads,,,[no="" body="" farm="" wagon="" an="" extea="" gas="" cupon="" during="" later="" now="" lets="" see,,hurtel,,,havent="" about="" while,,,there="" could="" be="" 2="" or="" 3,,,parts="" pulled="" town="" dump,,,town="" where="" made,,haha,,,seems="" heard="" overseas,,,did="" baer="" research="" this,,,,e="" m="" me="" ,,,there="" is="" man="" alive="" worked="" w="" h,chauncey="" wing="" machine="" shop,,1907="" mercedes,,,yes="" real="" seventy,,,,these="" things="" that="" leagends="" are="" made="" of,,,there="" ri="" also,,its="" on="" vmcca="" anglo="" am="" tour="" booklet,,on="" club="" ,com="" thing,,,,they="" trouble="" with="" how="" lube="" clutch,,it="" grabb="" d="" tore="" out="" several="" valve="" stems,,="" slipped="" wheel="" inside="" tire,,,this="" around="" 1948--49="" joe="" knowles="" talked="" this="" visited,,,this="" when="" my="" transport="" pope="" columbia="" 1speed="" bike!!!="" found="" drive="" spring="" anyone="" missing="" spring???="" by="" 1951="" henry="" [jr]="" restored="" beautiful="" clement="" bayard,,,,,there="" 1cyl="" olds,,,the="" had="" deep="" luster,,,a="" luster="" we="" were="" not="" see="" again="" till="" invention="" candy--apple,,,,this="" paint="" vernish="" george="" green,,lambertville="" nj,,,it="" also="" idled="" under="" 70="" rpm,,,this="" at="" fall="" meet="" of="" major="" guyette,,peterborough="" nh,,="" majors="" cars="" disapperd="" also,,,not="" one="" restored,,,oh="" yes,,,whose="" got="" dedion,,that="" a="" barn="" in="" woburn,,,,,next="" bleriott="" airplane,,,metz="" going="" use="" it="" as="" pattern="" and="" sell="" planes,,that="" was="" the="" old="" paris-madrid="" racer="" i="" think,,,,thats="" enough="" to="" get="" off="" thred,,,,ill="" try="" for="" more="" later,,,,ben[="" quote]="">

Ben - The Collings Foundation (Stow, MA) now owns that truck, so it is back close to where it started out.

</mass,,[home>

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I do remember a rather large, double decker bus in a corner of the museum's "back yard." It was in a rather sad state, with rotted tires, missing windows, etc., and it sure didn't look drivable. Clark also had a "Seven Santini Bros." moving van, which seemed to be a very static display, as well as a number of other sleeping giants. I'd guess that transporting such behemoths out of there after the museum closed was an enormously expensive undertaking. How I miss that wonderful place.

Bob

Found this thread looking for more info on Austin. The N.Y.C. double decker bus sat for many ,many year at a masonary supply yard on the south side of Rte 110, just north of Republic Aircraft. It just disappeared whrn the yard was redone a few years ago.

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I've always wondered where Austies money came from. Some say suger others corn flakes but what is the truth??

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I've always wondered where Austies money came from. Some say suger others corn flakes but what is the truth??

A recent article in Hemmings Classic Car says his father was the treasurer for Jack Frost Sugar in Cuba. I worked for the Pratt ( SOCONY and other oil related monies) in Glen Cove, they often sppoke of the Clarkes as Sugar barons. Paul

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Hi everyone, been awhile but been busy. See post #70 and click on Harry S. Harkness. His Steinway Piano is completed and restored to an amazing perfection. Alot of people were involved and it was fun learning about Harry and researching the instrument for others.:)

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The "Seven Santini Brothers"moving van is now totally restored and part of the Horsellss Carriant Transportation fleet in Patterson, N.J. i had shown at Hershey many times. great looking truck. :)

Clark also had a "Seven Santini Bros." moving van, which seemed to be a very static display, as well as a number of other sleeping giants. I'd guess that transporting such behemoths out of there after the museum closed was an enormously expensive undertaking. How I miss that wonderful place.

Bob

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Austie told me that a distant family relation owned the Stebbins House on Main Street here in Ridgefield. The house was part of the barricade Patriots used to slow the 2,200 British troops returning to their ships anchored in Westport, April 27, 1777. The house was riddled with musket ball and cannon shot. It was torn down in 1892, but a door is on display in the Historical Society. Ridgefield Discovery Center - Benjamin Stebbins

I've always wondered where Austies money came from. Some say suger others corn flakes but what is the truth??
Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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I want to thank you all for this thread about Mr. Clark. It is very interesting and informative. I wonder if any of you know about the Carnival of Cars Auto Museum which was located on Times Square in New York. I just happen to have an auction flyer from Henry Austin Clark, Jr. announcing an auction of the surplus and duplicates. It is dated August 20, 1955.

The 8 page long flyer includes the purpose of the sale, terms of the sale, special arrangements and a listing of 53 vehicles up for sale. The descriptions are humorous and some even indicate the previous owners.

Here is an example from the flyer:

"3.---1901 Locomobile Steam Stanhope,

The standard pattern Loco with side tiller steering. Unrestored and rough on the outside, but no plumber's helper has been loose on this one. Complete and all hooked up the way it should be. Needs 28x3 clincher rims for wire wheels, and in fact wheels too. One broken. A good cabinetmaker/steam fitter could make a going tea kettle out of her."

I look forward to hearing from you all.

Thank You,

Ready-Set-Go

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The Carnival of Cars closed on March 1, 1955. It must have cost a fortune to construct since the floors were lowered to allow room for the cars. I'd really like to have a xerox copy of the car auction list. Tracing cars from the early collectors is a hobby of mine. Clark, Peck, Melton, Rockafeller, and Bill Harrah all owned many of the same cars at one point.

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I'm hoping one of Clark's old friends can help me with this. It seems I remember Alec Ulmann and Austin discussing one of their old friends with the nickname of "Bunny." Does that name ring a bell with anyone? He could have been an old racing mechanic on old cars or early 1960s Grand Prix cars, or a collector, or ???

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GREAT and quick help here! :) That is certainly it. That is certainly the "Bunny" that they were always talking about. The name came up so often in conversations between Austie, Alec and Jim Mc Gee, (Out in Jim's old shop in Water Mill, which looked like "Stone Age" Equip, but wan't much he could not make from scratch to repair or restore exotic vintage engines. But it was WAAAY in the back of my mind.

I had found several dozen color slides, in a box from Alec, that was marked "1962 U.S.Grand Prix "Bunnys. Amazing close ups and track shots, from some one who obviously had full priveleges in the pits... candid shots including, John Surtees,

Graham Hill, Dan Gurney, Jack Brabham, Richie Ginther, Bruce McLaren, and Innes

Ireland, and other leeser known drivers, with some cool detail shots of cars & engines.

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Received an e-mail today from a man in Kreuztal, Germany who informed me that he owns a black 1929 Lincoln phaeton that was once in the Long Island Auto Museum. He purchased it in Toronto 12-15 years ago, had it restored, shipped it to Germany and used it on many rallies.

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I believe that Henry was trained as a lawyer but never had to actually work at any profession.

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I don't know what profession Austin was trained in, but my understanding is that the last paying job he held was as a Naval officer in WWII. I read this in an article written by Beverly Rae Kimes in Automobile Quarterly a number of years ago.

Rog

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Yes, he was in OSS operations in England during WWII.

I don't know what profession Austin was trained in, but my understanding is that the last paying job he held was as a Naval officer in WWII. I read this in an article written by Beverly Rae Kimes in Automobile Quarterly a number of years ago.

Rog

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I am happy to stumble upon this forum!! I was born in Southampton, and my grandmother was the front office manger / receptionist at the L.I. Auto museum. My mom worked full time , so my sister and I had to go with my Grandmother to work, all day, every day, at the museum, during the summer (seasonal town, so, closed in the winter). I had nothing to do so I wandered among the cars and fire trucks all day. The Thomas Flyer was in original, "end of race condition", and surrounded by a huge sort of diorama shell, with pictures that lit up from the famous race it won. (I remember feeling so bad about Harras restoring it, seemed a crime to me :) I rode the fire tucks and other cars Mr Clark was working on all the time, through the dirt roads in the back for testing. I read every sign about every car over and over (bored kid). I spent my day crawling in under around and through every car and truck, Bugatti's, Mercer's, Packards, Pierce Arrow's, Electric Cars, Simplex, La France, etc., and a Stanley Steamer (my favorite at the time). I still have souvenir's and Matchbox antique cars my Grandmother sold at the front counter, that didn't sell, at end of season,they gave me. I rode in the fire trucks in the 4th of July parades and had the enviable position of turning the crank that made the siren wail, every so often. (wonder why I'm a car buff, hmmm... ). Mr Clark (too young to call him Austie) was like family. Only now do I realize how special that all that was.

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