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1946 Lincoln Continental question


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I went to the LCOC website for some idea on my questions but can not view or leave commnets unless I am a member sooo I am hoping some of you can assist.

I am looking into the purchase of a 1946 Lincoln Continental, incomplete and no drivetrain. Body appears sound, interior mostly there. Rolling with spare tire cover. It appears to be missing the grille, the V12, transmission, radiator, etc.

How hard are these to get? I would join LCOC if I purchased so are there vendors and contacts from the club that could sell me the missing items? Or is this one of those cars to avoid because I would spend years tracking down parts I need. I know they did not make a lot of 46 Lincolns - are the 47's similar? To save the car I would use a 47 V12/drivetrain but don't think I want a 47 grille IF it is different.

Thanks for any help.

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Get a Cadillac OHV-V8 and hydramatic trans (The Continental came with a Hydramatic if it was equipped with an auto trans.) That makes a CAR out of it. Back in the fifties this was the fix whenever a Lincoln Continental 12 had a meltdown. Back then that engine was considered "too expensive to fix" and if Hydramatic-equipped the Caddy engine dropped right in, some modification necessary, but not much. I've driven three of the best Continental 12's there are and they were uniformly DOGS. The one I drove with the Caddy V-8 was a CAR.

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3Jakes, You've come to the right place! The LCOC has been completely taken over by the "modern" crowd of Continental owners. This club deals with the all the V12 equipped Lincolns and there are many Continental owners here to help. You will find these folks most helpful . The parts you need may be available from someone like Merv Adkins, see "sources" on the home page. Welcome aboard. Most all the parts you need are the same for all post war ('46 to '48) Continentals and all the mechanical componets are the same for all the Lincolns from '46 to '48. By all means bring the car back to it's original and unique elegance.

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Guest imported_V12Bill

While we are at it we can remove those push buttens and put in state of the art electronic remote door openers. Add a CD with 10 speakers and blast all the common folks off the road with some good hip hop. How about we Z the frame and chop that top down a good 5". A nice red Zebra skin interior should set it off real good. Paint it a kool flip flop purple. It would take a brave man to mess with that ride!! But wait a minute, we need to give it an IFS and disc brakes all around with rack and pinion power steering. Now we have a car that competes with Terry Cooks Scrape. Or we could save a lot of money and get a new Cadillac.

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You have sure got the right idea Bill!! Who in the world in their right mind would want to fool around with prehistoric 1946 junk anyway?? I mean if a person is going to have a V/12 Lincoln, they should at least have a Jag or Maserati 12 in it, I mean you don't have to settle for a paltry obsolete "General Motors Masterpiece" isn't it great there are so many options to "improve" these sad old cars, already the 6 volt alternator has been introduced that works exactly like the 6 volt generator did for so many years, just think where we will be by 2010!! Exciting isn't it, keep smiling, Rolf

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First, you need to FORGET the LCOC! They have little or no interest in the cars that caused them to be in existence and have opted to be a VERY LARGE club with varied interests.

If you REALLY want to know what the original Lincoln Continental (and Lincoln Zephyr) look like, take a look at: http://lzoc.org/photos/photos.htm

All early Continentals and Zephyrs were equipped with flathead V-12 engines and 3-speed manual transmissions. NO Cadillac engine or automatic transmission EVER left the factory in an early Continental or Zephyr!

All the parts you need are available from venders listed in the LZOC website at www.lzoc.org. There is even an on-line application form there.

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Phil,

Thanks so much for posting your clubs website. I had no idea there was a LZOC, only LCOC. I knew LCOC was all inclusive. Tough deal - as I am familiar with split interests. I am a Buick Club member and there is a love/hate relationship with the Riviera Owners Association (ROA) some ROA members refuse to join BCA, others vice versa. Things have gotten better recently.

mrpushbutton, I don't modify vehicle purchases that old. The V12 power and prowess (or lack thereof) is well documented. Personally, I have found a special interest in the club coupes of the 40's. I am into automotive history, so I look at everything from the teens to the 70's, but time and again, I keep coming back to 40's era club coupes. I want to get a broad swath of them. We all have our favorites - Lincolns, Buicks, etc. but none of these cars were perfect.

By the way, I checked out the For Sale section of the website and for the post war period, the car I am considering is the 1st one listed. It states that it was posted on 03-16-2006, which I find hard to believe. Are you telling me this great, but incomplete car has been offered to the Lincoln V12 crowd for over a year and no takers?

I found several reasonably priced pre and post war Lincolns FS. Also, I checked out the photo section. I had not followed or known much about the "Zephyr". I am a big Chrysler Airflow fan, and basically a huge fan of the late 30's streamlined Art Deco masterpieces put out by Chrysler and Lincoln. But close on research of the Zephyr has always eluded me (no books I think) Sure I heard the stories of John Tjaarda and others doing the styling but the Zephyr was always put out there as a milestone car without the in depth analysis, so full knowledge has eluded me.

A "poor mans" Airflow? I don't want to ruffle feathers. I love the 37 C17 Airflow Imperial. Chrysler finally got it right by stretching out the wheelbase and uprighting the grille in it's final year but the Zephyr looks better in 37-38 guise, based on the limited number of photos on the club website. And of course, Zephyr was a fast train, if I am not mistaken. The Airflows were often advertised with a train in the background.

I had a friend who had an incomplete C17 Airflow FS and a late thirties Zephyr FS, so that goes to show how intertwined these cars were. Although I am a Buick fan, their 37's and 38's seem dowdy and boxy by comparison. Not even close to the Zephyr and Airflow. I like the Buick grille just fine, but the balance, no way.

But I have drifted off the topic. It appears I would be supported by some vendors. And parts are available, plus club support and manuals. I am close to having the funds to pay for the car, my only concern is transport from Rhode Island to Iowa, now that would probably be in the $750 range. Although I have 3 old cars, I'm a typical poor family man right now. I would think the 46 Continental would be a prize for my collection. Personally I only want one other car, the 46-48 Chrysler New Yorker. I have spotted a 47 Nash Ambassador 8 club coupe, in Maine at a dealer, I'd like to have. Just love those club coupes, love the squared off look of the Continental. Thanks again for all the help, and I'll keep you posted.

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3Jakes, no doubt that car is salvageable, I think it actually has been posted prior to March. Looked a little to ambitious for me, but locally I am aware of a 1941 Continental coupe that I have not seen but I understand to be complete (inc. engine, transmission, etc.) and in rust free condition but in need of a full restoration in the $7,500 range.

I may see this guy this weekend, I do not know him well but he is an old timer in the hobby with a good reputation. I have thought about checking this car out for myself as I am interested either a Lincoln or a Packard - a tough decision. Also, I don't want to part with either of the cars I currently own, and will probably not be able to add a third outright until I get my offspring through college in another four years..

On the other hand, if you are not afraid of a full on restoration, it sure would be nice to prevent the one in RI from the crusher. I have been hoping SOMEONE bites on it as it is truly one of the great designs of the era in my opinion. Good luck on your pursuit, and let me know if you are at all interested in the '41 -

If interested I will find out what I can on it for you.

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Actually mrpushbutton, toss out that bloated OHV Caddy V8 and h-matic tranny and stick in a mid-60s 289 smallblock backed up by a C4 with a shift kit. I mean, half the weight, twice the horsepower, and twice the gas mileage -- now we're talking a *real* car.

As you can see, it's pointless to compare yesterday's apples to today's oranges <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

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If you like Chrysler Airflows, you might be interested in looking at two Webshots photo albums of the 'Airflows to Zephyrs' exhibit at the Petersen Museum in Los Angeles a couple of years ago. The photo albums are at:

Jeff?s: http://community.webshots.com/album/113460702dYbVlX

Mike Levy?s: http://community.webshots.com/album/111846624Kstfyg

Happy Viewing!

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And if you like Studebakers, the site right here on the AACA is fantastic!! As I found out recently, great guys willing to share info, but what I am unsure of is what the heck you really want??? If a Connie is discounted because you think it has been for sale too long, maybe that is not the car you really want, and you should wait until someone offers an amphibicar yesterday, and snap that up, forgive me, I am getting entirely too old for this stuff

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i am currently working on 41 zephyr with v12 and restoring it to original condition. i have found this club to be the most supportive of any i have been involved with. i also belong to chevy and kaiser club. just look through the posts and you will see how many of the members spend lots of time helping each other. the sources list on the club site can provide you with almost any parts you need. you will note in some of the posts a listing for jake fleming in dallas as the coil and distributor guhru--well he is. i call him at home and he will patiently guide me through virtually any repair or problem. if you like the car the support and parts are available. here is recent photo. david

post-42668-143137932179_thumb.jpg

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3Jakes, Just FYI Took another look at this car, I am assuming it is the same one posted in the general buy/sell section of this forum, on page 3 or 4, there are a lot of detail pictures there. I think one reason it may be very slow to move is the fact that, while honsetly represented, this is a very heavy project at best. Not sure about Wisc. but here in the northeast I would not be so sure as to count on a solid body, even though it appears fairly straight and in one color, my guess is there is a lot of work to be done around the edges, floors, etc. Check out the condition of the inner panels in the underhood shots. I am not saying pass, but I do not blame you for considering your options carefully.

I have been following these lately and for such a rare car I am surprised projects and drivers show up in HMN fairly regularly. You may need to go to the 5-8K range for a "good start", but I would think a car that is intact would pay that dividend back pretty quickly. Of course, your skills may be well beyond mine, but I usually follow that old adage, the better the start, the better the finish. Driver coupes remain reasonable enough that is probably the route I will take.

The dilema with a car like that is you really don't want to see it rodded out or crushed, but it will need a pretty strong committment on the part of it's restorer. IF you are the patient kind looking for a long term project it may make sense, I have never seen a cheaper one.

Just 2 more cents -

I would call the guy, you will probably get an honest description - ie is there any trim left in boxes inside, etc.

If you were to bring this home, I don't think a period Cad & AT is a mortal sin, better than leaving it in the field if you cannot get all the parts. Just my opinion, but I would say that is a far cry from a nighmare like a couple of these gents describe above.

Do keep us posted!!

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Steve,

Thanks for your comments. I would need to pass on the 41 Continental for price considerations. I like the body better though, as most do. Regrettably, I typically can only afford projects. I am not shy about buying them. i am doing 3 body offs now, and have no timetable. I'm 43, and I basically want a 5-7 car mix done by age 55, so I can go to club events, small town car shows, bigger National meets and leisurely touring. I have a 5 1/2 year old so the "55" plan sort of coincides with her late teen years. I am capable of doing all but major rust repair and upholstery.

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3Jakes - that is an interesting plan, and I wish you best of luck with it. We are the same age & I admire your dedication. I have done one restoration, had one car largely done by pros, and had several drivers. I would like to restore another myself and agree that no timetable is the best approach. This is getting to be less commonplace in the hobby. One school of thought is why pay for a driver if you are planning a full restoration, which has its merits also. When I was a teen, we knew many people who were involved in their own restorations, today, I know a lot of "car guys" but true hobbyists who have a frame off in process, only a handful. I guess I am in the "driver/tinkerer" class for now, due mainly to time.

Buy that Lincoln, and post your progress - always the best type of posts on this forum!

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Steve,

About every 4 years I buy a driver, but the problem is that anything beyond say, 75 per cent restored is worthy of a restoration. It costs, for me, the same to restore a project car (hopefully complete) and a driver car. I have certainly enjoyed those drivers though. My 68 Buick Riviera came from New Mexico and simply has a rust free body and frame, but had no motor, and I got it for $1000 delivered. The 63 Pontiac is a local find $600, so I saved a bundle on transport. The 49 Buick was a trade with another Buick collector. It's value was about $2500 but the body is off on that one. 63 Pontiac soon to follow. Projects are fairly inexpensive now as few people want to do full-on restorations and I can not blame them. Baby boomers with wads of cash and home equity loans are satisfying their wants by purchasing finished cars - at a premium. They live in suburbia, and the wife couldn't imagine a torn down old car in the garage next to the minivan. But she can appreciate a restored Camaro with a 5 per cent rate of return.

I don't think the 46 Continental is the best looking 46 offering from manufacturers but it represents that period of styling very well. I saw the photos of the cars from the LZOC website and all the Continentals wear great paint and gleaming chrome, they look nice. And I like the dashs and interiors.

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