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how do I change tires on a 120


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Wipe the tire to be changed very carefully with a moistened towelette. Liberally apply some talcum to the bottom. Fold the new cover in a triangle pattern and fasten all three corners with a castellated nut. Be careful when wiping the bottom or you may get sprayed with some PB Blaster. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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I am totally "lost" by the above-two "posts". I am not too bright, so unable to figure out if these to "posts" are a put-on.

Last time I changed a tire on an American production car made after the 1920's, with the exception of some early 1930's "hold-overs", they all had the standard "drop center" type wheel. You jack the car up, take the bolts (or in some cases, nuts and studs) off, put the tire in a "changer", knock the bead down into the "drop center" portion, and..marvel of marvels, you can change the tire.

What am I missing here..?

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My apologies, but since your post was on April Fool's day and it seemed rather far-fetched as anyone knows how to change a tire, I just assumed you were having fun with us. I apologize since your request was in earnest.

I would never use a bumper jack on anything. It will mar the finish on chrome bumpers and is unsafe. May I suggest a small floor jack placed on the frame just ahead of the rear wheel for the rear tires or placed under the lower A-frame for either of the front tires.

I have modified a Chevy jack designed to be used on the frame by adding a lip so that it cannot slide inward on the frame. It works like a bumper jack but is horizontal and is pumped by your foot instead of by hand. It is much safer. There are no other special considerations that I can think of.

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Chrysler did that up thru the 50s and I think GM did it for a while. I don't recall ever hearing that Packard did it. In any case the studs are marked "L" or "R" to identify that. I think that was a carryover from the horse and buggy eraa when threads were much coarser and would actually spin off.

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Randy - there is a good reason why you "dont recall" whether Packard had "left" and "right" wheel bolts - because they didnt! Our friend with the "120" need have no fear of screwing anything up. You CAN jack those things up by the bumpers, but I am opposed to that - the car originally came with a nice screw-type axle jack - I carry a little "bottle jack" for emergency use. He can't mess up on the wheel bolts - because they are all the same.

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My "new" Packard is a Model 1901 4 dr sedan. I am impressed with a solid car and it's engineering. Because of this I was chagrined to find no jack in the car, no place to put a jack and no mention of a jack or tire changing procedure in the original owner's manual. While I intend to drive it, the only defect is a non-functioning overdrive despite all-new electric wiring and relay. Since the green light fails to light, I suspect the problem is in the governor. As the weather breaks, I'll be on the road. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

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You are correct that in that era, Packard provided no tire-changing instructions in the Owner's Manual. They did provide a jack. It was a screw-type axle jack, found under the seat in some years and models, in the trunk in the later ones, along with a lug wrench, wrapped in an orange-colored canvas bag. I do not recall seeing instructions for the pre-war cars.

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