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73 Riviera A/C hoses?


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Many "hose" places can do the hoses. ACDelco and others make the respective ends and such, including the "block" were they attach to the back of the a/c compressor . . . all you need is the rubber hose in-between them to match for length and configuration. Many auto supplies that have access to the hose ends and such can pretty much match anything you might throw at them.

A few considerations . . . IF you ever plan on using R-134a refrigerant, you'll need "barrier" hoses rather than the normal "rubber" hoses. The barrier hose has a "barrier" on the inner section of the hose to keep all of the R-134a inside the hose. Using normal rubber hose that has not been "sealed" and "cured" (over time and use) with the R-12 mineral oil in the system will allow the R-134a to escape through the rubber itself.

The stock GM hose fittings were "barb" fittings, where the hose slides over the fitting and is then clamped (either with an a/c grade hose clamp or the band clamp as in production or rebuilt locally). The barbs pierce the barrier in the barrier hose, basically rendering the barrier "violated". Therefore, the R-134a fittings are "bead lock" (as current OEM fittings are) and they do have different cosmetics than the prior hose clamps/crimps. Rather than barbs, the fittings have "beads" that take their place and do not pierce the barrier layer of the barrier hose--the crimping operation is the same, just that it looks different than for the R-12 hoses.

I have not shopped for beadlock fittings which will approximate OEM fittings, but I suspect they are out there somewhere . . . IF somebody has a catalog and knows how to use it. Usually, a key difference in the "universal" fittings I seem to see on the street rod a/c fittings and the OEM systems is the radius of the bends (being tighter on the OEM fittings). There might also be similar fittings for different hose diameters . . . not to forget the muffler in the system, too.

In general, if you search long enough you can probably find somebody that can and WILL build you some hoses which look "right" for the vehicle (whether with R-12 fittings and normal hose or beadlock fittings for R-134a and barrier hose). Hopefully, you've got enough of your original hoses to use as a good pattern?

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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What is the muffler?

the tank looking thing?

what is it purpose and what should be done with it?

i do plan to change the compressor and go to r134a and the barrier hose,

good info about the barb piercing thing.

Thanks!

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Many "hose" places can do the hoses. ACDelco and others make the respective ends and such, including the "block" were they attach to the back of the a/c compressor . . . all you need is the rubber hose in-between them to match for length and configuration. Many auto supplies that have access to the hose ends and such can pretty much match anything you might throw at them.

A few considerations . . . IF you ever plan on using R-134a refrigerant, you'll need "barrier" hoses rather than the normal "rubber" hoses. The barrier hose has a "barrier" on the inner section of the hose to keep all of the R-134a inside the hose. Using normal rubber hose that has not been "sealed" and "cured" (over time and use) with the R-12 mineral oil in the system will allow the R-134a to escape through the rubber itself.

The stock GM hose fittings were "barb" fittings, where the hose slides over the fitting and is then clamped (either with an a/c grade hose clamp or the band clamp as in production or rebuilt locally). The barbs pierce the barrier in the barrier hose, basically rendering the barrier "violated". Therefore, the R-134a fittings are "bead lock" (as current OEM fittings are) and they do have different cosmetics than the prior hose clamps/crimps. Rather than barbs, the fittings have "beads" that take their place and do not pierce the barrier layer of the barrier hose--the crimping operation is the same, just that it looks different than for the R-12 hoses.

I have not shopped for beadlock fittings which will approximate OEM fittings, but I suspect they are out there somewhere . . . IF somebody has a catalog and knows how to use it. Usually, a key difference in the "universal" fittings I seem to see on the street rod a/c fittings and the OEM systems is the radius of the bends (being tighter on the OEM fittings). There might also be similar fittings for different hose diameters . . . not to forget the muffler in the system, too.

In general, if you search long enough you can probably find somebody that can and WILL build you some hoses which look "right" for the vehicle (whether with R-12 fittings and normal hose or beadlock fittings for R-134a and barrier hose). Hopefully, you've got enough of your original hoses to use as a good pattern?

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467 </div></div>

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The "muffler" is an inline "can" that helps dampen the pressure pulses from the compressor's output. Not all GM vehicles had them, but many that didn't have them can also have humming condensors (under certain heat/rpm conditions). The mufflers were generally part of the hose fitting which attaches to the rear of the compressor, but can also be put inline somewhere else on that line.

I found out about the muffler deal on my '77 Camaro V-8. One day, the first real day that needed a/c, back in the later 1970s or thereabouts, during certain rpm ranges I heard this "hummm" from under the hood. It seemed to be related to the a/c as when I turned it off, it didn't do it and it did do it with the a/c on. At that time, the car was still in GM extended warranty so they put on a new GM a/c compressor . . . which did the same thing a week or so later. That's when the shop foreman mentioned the muffler deal. It seems that Pontiac Firebirds got a/c system mufflers and the similar Camaros did not. He told me where to go (an auto supply) where he'd had good luck getting those things. So I went there and got the necessary fittings (which also required a different end fitting on the condensor due to a difference in hose ID), hose, seals, and clamps and it was a "bolt-in" situation (outside of the evac and recharge operations).

The GM compressors (the A-6) is plenty strong enough to handle R-134a (my a/c parts company associate said that even the "rattling" R-4s will live with it, even the ones from the middle '80s that were all noisey), so all you'll need to do is to change the oil to something compatible with R-134a and be good to go--provided that your existing compressor is in good condition.

The A-6s were rated at something like 10 cubic inches of displacement, but the later (and larger diameter) R-4s were upgraded to about that size. One reason for the R-4's existence was that it takes less power to run. I'm not sure about mounting brackets for using an R-4 on your engine, though, although I think they were used on the later Buick 350s in some cars (which might be a similar mounting arrangement to your vehicle).

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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