Jump to content

Got an odd axle to identify.


007Jeep
 Share

Recommended Posts

This was posted on one of the 4wd forums I frequent, I'm clueless.

Guesses so far are a mid 40's to early 50's dodge, but that doesn't sound right to me with the strange differential gearset and bracketry. Someone said a 30's Austin 7 used a similar gearset arangement, but the axle is 55" wide so no way it would fit under an Austin. Looks like an aluminum differential housing to me due to the coloration and lack of corrosion.

The stuff that is known so far.

*4.33 gears

*planetary type of set up

*casting #20087 with a star next to it

*tapered shafts and measures about ~55 inches wide

On to the pics.

DSCN0275.jpg

DSCN0276.jpg

mystery_rear_end_0031.jpg

mystery_rear_end_0081.jpg

So, any ideas?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a Franklin rear end, or at least it looks like one to me. Franklin used this type of axle (aluminum center with truss) all the way to 1934, but I think this is for a car of the 1920s. I believe series 10 or 11, which makes it from 1922 to 1927. My 1932 series 16 has a different shape cover, but my father's 1923 series 10 looks like this one. I think the axles changed design in 1928 or 1929. Post this in the Franklin section, and somebody more knowlegable than me will be able to tell you for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me be the one to welcome my son to the forum! Ken actually is a moderator for a popular 4WD forum and is an ace welder and mechanic. Guess where he caught the bug to play with things with wheels? He originally sent me this info for possible ID but since it isn't Model T Ford, I was not able to help and suggested this forum might be the best place to get some answers.

Welcome aboard!

Terry Bond

Link to comment
Share on other sites

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">1937hd45, it just sat well on the floor that way. Sorry, the axle was sitting alone at a bone yard.

Thanks sdbraverman and Ken </div></div>

Welcome to the Forum! Franklin was the first car that came to mind but I couldn't back up that guess with a photo. If the front axle and steering box it there I'll buy them, you're Dad can have all the sparkplugs. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the welcome and information.

Now, does anyone have the time to explain the planetary arrangement in the differential? It almost looks vaguely like a torsion type limited slip, but I'm not sure they were working on that type of deal in the 30's. 2 speed rear end maybe for a cruising gear? Were the planetaries there for further gear reduction in the differential case?

Possibly I'm just over thinking things and they are just another approach to spyder gears for diferentiation in wheel speed while cornering.

Dad got the classic car bug, I ended up with the "take it apart and figure out how to make it stronger" bug. Between the two of us, we pretty much have the field covered. Helps that he had me lappin valves on a Morris 8 before I could ride a bike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could be a Brown / Lipe of the vintage mentioned by sdbraverman. They provided differentials, transmissions and various items to many manufacturers of the day, Franklin included. Their plants were not too far from one another in Syracuse. (My Grandfather worked for Lipe, my Dad for Franklin)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lipe Rollway is one and the same. (I think the merger was Brown and Lipe with Rollway Bearing, but it was way before my time) The last job my Grandfather had with Lipe was travelling around doing setup and evaluation of different machines sold to production outfits, that seat lathe could be one of theirs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

That is a spur gear diff, which were reasonably common pre-1920 on the other side of the pond from you. I have a 1911 Napier and a 1913 Sunbeam with this arrangement. The WW2 medium and light US army tanks used this same system, and I guess there must have been some advantage in strength since the steering was through brakes on either side working through the differential. I got rid of the last of the war surplus a few years ago, so I cannot og and look at one now to describe it. Lee, Grant, and Sherman were made by Chrysler and Baldwin Locomotive that I saw; as were a derivative made by Oliver for the low silhouette Australian Cruiser tank. The Stuart light tank was similar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...