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1930 Loose Wooden Wheel Spoke


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My 1930 coupe has developed a squeak at low speeds. It is probably there at higher speeds but I just can't hear it over the other noise. A couple of people have suggested that the squeak is probably a loose spoke on one of the wooden artillery wheels. They have told me to jack the car up and tap on the spokes to find the loose one. But they really didn't have any suggestions about what to do after I've found the loose one. Does anyone have any suggestions about what to do about it? I've tried soaking the wheels with water but it doesn't seem to help. I'm really stumped. Those wood wheels sure look nice but boy what a pain in the......

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I am surprised. Yours is the first Jaxon wheel that I have heard of with a loose spoke. If the spoke is unfinished you could coat it over and over with boiled linseed oil, or soak it. Once it absorbed the oil it might be tight again. The real problem is if it has been loose long enough it may have worn. The solution then is to have a new hickory spoke made.

I have never had a problem with my wheels but that may be because it has always been on the road (my daily driver since 1959) and have been refinished ever six to eight years.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I am surprised. Yours is the first Jaxon wheel that I have heard of with a loose spoke. If the spoke is unfinished you could coat it over and over with boiled linseed oil, or soak it. Once it absorbed the oil it might be tight again. The real problem is if it has been loose long enough it may have worn. The solution then is to have a new hickory spoke made.

I have never had a problem with my wheels but that may be because it has always been on the road (my daily driver since 1959) and have been refinished ever six to eight years. </div></div>

Hey thanks for the quick response. I have admired you since I foundout you drive that car as a daily driver. I think its great! I drive mine as much as I can. That's what I bought it for!

Well, first off, I'm not 100 percent convinced it is a loose spoke. That is just what other people have suggested. The wheels were refinished by the guy I bought the car from but I'm not sure when. I have noticed that the varnish has worn off in a couple of places and I was going to put a new coating of varnish on sometime this winter. I will try your suggestion and also try to locate the loose spoke (if indeed any are loose). BTW, I didn't know they were called Jaxon wheels. Learn something new every day

If it isn't a loose spoke, do you have any other ideas of what the squeak could be? I had the speedo cable restored, so I don't think it would be that. Actually the up and down sound (frequency if you will) of the squeak seems to be too high for it to be a spoke, but I'm stumped otherwise.

thanks

Mike

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Your squeak may be the felloe rubbing against the split rim. Double check all the lugs & lug nuts to be sure they are tight. If you do have a loose spoke, it can be loose inside the hub (rubbing against the next spoke), or on the outer end where it enters the felloe.

The hub squeak can be fixed by inserting hack saw blade spacers between the spokes. Be careful to add these spacers evenly so your hub stays centered.

Fixing a felloe squeak for good is relatively easy if you can get some "wood Swell" from a good hardware store or furniture restoration supply house. Drill a 1/4" hole in the end of the offending spoke and put just a couple of drops of "wood Swell" into the hole and leave it overnight. This stuff actually expands the wood fibers to make the spoke tight again. Fill the hole with linseed oil and cap it with a spent .22 shell casing. The oil will replenish the wood so it doesn't dry out and get loose.

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The most likely wheel squeek is the rim working on the felloe. That is one or more of the wedges is not tight. Put a square or something on the ground and turn the wheel slowley. You may find the rim isn't running true. An other quick check is to see if any of the rim bolts or wedges have any rust on them. That is a sure sign that the are working back and forth.

I would never ever shim a wheel if the car was going to be driven very much.

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Barry22 is correct but remember the felloe is the outer metal ring on the wheel (the piece that holds the spokes in). Not the demountable rim that holds the tire. Remember with an artillery wheel the "wheel" is; a hub (may be two or more pieces)a number of spokes and a felloe. The bearings, seal, rim bolts, wedges and the rim are extras.

One of the reasons for using the correct name for parts is to prevent any mixup when discribing things. (ie; a felloe is a felloe and a rim is what you mount a tire on before you install a mounted tire on a wheel).

If your tire rim is bent it could be responsible for yur squeek.

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Michael:

The wheels on my 27 have come loose in the past and mine definitely squeak when loose. It is easy to check for looseness, just jack up the axle so the wheel is in the air and push and pull the tire/rim perpendicular to the plane of the wheel. This will usually produce fairly obvious motion between the felloe and the tips of the spokes. There should be absolutely no relative motion when you do this. Even a small amount indicates that the spokes are not tight enough.

I have shimmed mine with stainless steel washers (.015 thick if I recall) on the tips of the spokes. This does require disassembly of the wheel, a daunting but not impossible task. Number all the spokes before you try this, they need to be reassembled in the same place. Check the hub carriage bolts too, a loose hub can also cause squeaks and looseness in the wheel.

Driving with a loose wheel will damage the spokes pretty quickly, the ends get abraded off. You will need a lot of shims to fix this or a set of new spokes. Fortunately, new spokes are still being made by a gentlemen called Calimer from PA.

Bill.

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