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Reattas for sale!


ronvb
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Ever since the posting of brake problems There has been so many postings for Reattas<BR>for sale. Brake problems and brake systems can be fixed or modified---why give up on such a unique car!<BR>Ok now blast me with feedback.<BR>ronvb grin.gif" border="0

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At these fire sale prices why not pick up a couple spares for your estate should you crack one up?<P> confused.gif" border="0 <P>Actually my dream car e-type has just become available to me. So you have a rare opportunity to purchase a car that I have been driving and maintaining as though I would have it and be driving for another 37 years. Act fast and it can be yours.<P>No flaming here just another opportunity. smile.gif" border="0

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Well Robert you are quite the salesman!<BR>Here in N.J. there are quite a few of Reattas<BR>for sale and priced fairly cheap. Typical price for coupes $2500-$4500 88-90's. 91 coupes and convertibles a little scarce and when available about double that price.<BR>As a matter of fact the other day I spotted a Maroon 89 on a small used car lot and his price was $4500 average shape -average wear and tear.<BR>ronvb wink.gif" border="0

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Problem is that "average wear and tear" on a Reatta means something entirely different from your average car.<P>Thought my '88 was exceptional when I bought it (is now or almost) but have put about $1500 into it so far and that is my cost.<P>True, the cosmetics needed almost nothing (which is good because am not skilled at cosmetics) but have experienced just about everything else. <P>Now this may be because I am something of a perfectionist particularly about mechanical/electrical elements and if am going to work on something (like my cureent ECM/BCM) project, I like to have all of the parts lines up first.<P>Also partially because I prefer OEM to aftermarket (not fanatic about it, just prefer).<P>Some of this is possible because the money I save by not having a car payment pays for a lot of maintenance. Another is because most of my driving these days is to and from the airport. Rest is just because I find working on a car to be relaxing and have the facilities at home to do just about anything.<P>But then if we weren't a bit off, we would all be driving grey sedans...

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Padgett,<BR>I am a fanactic about all my cars,more so with my 1970 Chevelle. I expect to put $1000.-$2000 into any car I buy just to make it as close to perfect as humanly possible.<BR>But I must agree with you the Reatta is indeed a challenge to keep on top of.<BR>The car I spoke of on the car lot runs good but has minor cosmetic problems and an electrical problem as well -but is solid just the same.<BR>ronvb grin.gif" border="0

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Am somewhat the same way about my '70 Judge. Unlike the Reatta I have a few spare engines and transmissions for it. However it has manual disk brakes, manual transmission, Quadrajet. Most complex element is the a/c and have a number of spares for that. Very simple to keep in shape.<P>Still it has had the 14x6's replaced with 15x8s, delrin, larger sway bars front and rear, and a few other non-stock elements underneath.<P>Money that most in my neighborhood spent on pools was put into a garage so have room for seven (five is more comfortable) under roof.<P>Only thing I am missing at the moment is a convertable but have had several and the tops were rarely down. Would have to be a one-hander like the FIAT 124. Still if the urge gets too intense, there is always the Fiero....

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If you can purchase a Reatta from the original owner, you will probably get a very well maintained car. But like a couple of Corvettes I have owned.... purchase them from someone that could barly make the payments and don't expect everything to be working.<P>These owners want the flash, but don't have the $$$ to maintain the vehicle. When they find something they like better, they trade in the ______ (you add the car name) and upgrade to a new set of payments... their discarded vehicle will not be in tip-top shape.<P>Because the parts and service prices for the Reatta are on the upper end of the scale, these owners have only added gas and lets hope a few oil changes.

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Barney,<BR>What you say is true, but always "let the buyer be ware".I have owned lots of GM cars and before buying I have gone over each car completely --sometimes not once but twice before buying. It all depends on what you depend on doing with the car, whether it is to be a show car, a garage queen ,or a daily runner. Price is a prime factor and sometimes you are right it pays to buy a one owner babied car if you can swing the extra cash for the purchase.What's even better is when you have owned 2-3 of the same year & type car and you know every strong and weak point of the vehicle. To confess I was curious about the Reatta--and I got a graet deal on one a collector wanted to move so I picked it up knowing I was going to have to invest some cash to make it look and run my way.<BR>ronvb grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0

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Wow Barney, I just don't know where you and many others get the impression that the Reatta is an expensive car to maintain. In 5 years I have done rotors front and back, a couple sets of pads, struts, water pump (costs 1/4 of the Riv's), rad flush, thermostat, transmission flushes and filters, plugs, wires, O2 sensor. The seized air-conditioner compressor that failed 300 miles from home with towing ran into some money. Didn't like the $100 or so for a hubcap that a souvenir hunter took. For the most part, (touch wood) I have found the car to be one of the more economical ones especially considering the miles I have put on it, 53,000. I feel that the parts are in line with or lower than other cars out there. You have got to try and maintain a SHO Yamaha engine, a 4 door Bimmer or my fav a 71 454 vette, then you will know what expensive is all about. Just my thoughts...Robert

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A used car is a used car, plain and simple. Sure the Reatta is a unique and beautiful car, but they are all now 10-13 years old. As with any used car, gaskets need to be replaced, bushings wear out, bearings start to go, brake lines need to be replaced, engines are showing their age. It's naive to think that you can plunk down your hard-earned cash for a 10-13 year old car and think that you're getting a brand new car that won't need any work at all. The only cars that hold their value are the ones where the owner takes it out once a month for a spin around the block and it has only 5,000 on the odometer. Those are rare cars that are traded among collectors, not the daily drivers that we're seeing for sale on this board lately.<P>A used car is a used car, and it will need work no matter what the seller says.

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Personally...torture to me would be to have an absolutely mint or 100 point body off restoration that was stored in a climate controlled garage. Be it a Deusenberg, Reatta or Ferrari, I am going to drive and enjoy the car to the fullest by putting on lots of miles, just my opinion, Robert<P>These cars are <I>Rolling art work</I>, emphasis on <B>ROLLING...</B><p>[ 10-04-2001: Message edited by: Drive it like I stole it. ]

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Hey guys,<BR>Why not have two Reattas--1 for daily driving and 1 low-mileage original with say around 10k on the odometer. The best of both worlds and twice the fun! AND TWICE THE MAINTENANCE AS WELL!<BR>I bought this Reatta to drive--because the real fun with this car is the way it drives and handles and the occasional head turn reaction you get from motorists. How many times does someone walk up to you in a parking lot and say ---HEY I remember these cars--I almost bought one!<BR>ronvb grin.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0

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Agree with a lot of what has been said BUT with a twist.<P>Have never had the luxury of sufficient disposable income to "just buy one" though have known people who did. <P>I grew up in Palm Beach and came to think that if any car represented the overall town, it was a Rolls Royce drophead with bald tires. There were few "favorite cars" like the '36 Auburn 852 that appeared in a lot of the pictures.<P>Lots of glitz but often disposed of for something new and bright and glittering when the ashtrays got full.<P>What you rally want to find is a low milage car owned by someone who always wanted one and could finally afford it. These are the cars that have low milage AND constant care.<P>Unfortunately, the Reatta never really defined its market. One result was that I doubt that many sold anywhere near list.<P>Central Florida has many because Buick promotes PGA golfing and every year hordes of TOL Buicks appear. They remain when the golfers depart and get disposed of somehow.<P>Once these cars would have simply languished but the web has made it possible for a lot of people in diverse areas to get together. Consider the death of the DeLorian or the Bricklin which, in many ways, were similar cars.<P>But the truth is that to find a well maintained one-owner car is a rarety. The PO had spent a considerable amount of money on mine but to a shop with indifferent knowlege. Reatta's are different.<P>Part of the attraction to me was that the Reatta has basically the same drivetrain as our Bonneville and TranSport. This makes it easy to get parts and work on. This also lulls people into thinking the oddball parts (TEVES, digital dash) will also be easy to work on. Rong.<P>With a Ferrari, the shop will be expensive but will be trained on every element of the car and will know when to call in a expert. Not so with the Reatta. <P>Normal shop will find a bad O2 sensor (if they can figure out where to plug the scan tool in) but will consistantly overfill the brake resovoir.<P>Problem is that a "collector" will pay homage to the altar of "exactly the way it rolled down the assembly line" and that is often not a good idea for a driver's car (why my Judge has 15x8's, Fiero has 15x7's, and Reatta has 16x7's none of which came on them) - particularly one where the bean-counters got involved.<P>But these were small changes and reversible just like a "normal" braking system would be.<P>For me the Reatta fills a niche in an interesting car that is relaxing to drive, easy to maintain, and I feel comfortable parking at the airport (though would be nice if the door was about 6" shorter and the seat an inch lower - working on the latter).<P>Am planning to lay in spares for the oddball parts that could fail (when I sold out of Corvettes, it took two semis and a flatbed, all stuff accumulated while in college on GIBill), but have no reason to have two.<P>And until a nice Facel-Vega HK-500 drops out of a tree (we all have dreeams), the Reatta suits me nicely.<p>[ 10-05-2001: Message edited by: padgett ]

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when i bought my reattas(3 & 7 years ago) they were mostly all 1 owner, low mileage cars. they tended to come from financially well off people , who could afford the new price, and best maintenance, and garages. most soon traded them once the novelty wore off. my 89 was traded on a mercedes, my 90 on a ferari. now things are different because of time in service most have high miles, many past owners. the days of the cherry one owner are mostly gone.

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