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TG57Roadmaster

Airplanes & Buicks & Caddys, Oh My!

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January 1, 1984 we celebrated the 70th Anniversary of the beginning of commercial aviation with the first commercial flight. It was a plane called the

Benoist that flew from St Petersburg to Tampa with U.S. Mail. On that day they flew a replica of the Benoist and the pilot, Tony Janus rode out to the plane in a 1913 car. At the same airport (Albert Whitted) where National Airlines was born in 1934, we went to the Benoist flight with our 1915 Model T Ford. Neither of these planes is the Benoist.

In 2014 we'll celebrate 100 years with as many 100 year old cars and airplanes as we can find. I need a 1914 Ford Model T.

Can anyone identify the planes?

Paul

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Edited by Paul Dobbin (see edit history)

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1942 Ford and Douglas C-47A.

Okay Okay, they are models.

PP

Hey Pomeroy, it's great that they're models! I'm working on a 1/43rd-1/48th scale Heinkel

He-111 Lufthansa passenger version with cars and will post the results when it's done.

How'd you like to get your hands on one of these Connie models?

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From Popular Mechanics, June 1942

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Plane/car enthusiast extraordinaire Centurion alerted me that a Lufthansa Super-Constellation

will be flying home from Maine to Germany this summer. What a sight (and flight) that would be!

Thanks for the C-47A pics, and all the others, too!

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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These shots were taken this afternoon - 12 February 2012 - at West Melton airfield, just west of Christchurch, New Zealand. The occasion was an open day to remember that it was 50 years to the day that one of New Zealand's great aviation mysteries began, with the disappearance of a De Havilland Dragonfly on a sightseeing trip to Milford Sound. No trace of the aircraft or its passengers has ever been found. When you see pictures of the rugged terrain in the area it comes as no surprise. Another five aircraft have disappeared in the same general area in the years since.

Unfortunately the vintage Dragonfly aircraft that was supposed to appear at today's event suffered engine problems at its home base near Gore in Southland - about 250 miles south of Christchurch - but there were a few other De Havilland aircraft there, including the Tiger Moth in the picture and a couple of Chipmunk trainers. Also, a De Havilland Vampire jet fighter did a fly past. The local Vintage Car Club was invited to display cars at the event and about 100 turned up, ranging from a Holsman and an Alldays and Onions, both of 1905, to cars of the 1970s.

The two Packards in the picture are a 1930 733 sport phaeton which was restored in the 1960s and still looks as good today as it did then - and is still owned by the same person, and a 1937 115-C six, one of only two rumble seat coupes to be imported to NZ in 1937, which has just been returned to the road after 40 years in storage. Behind the coupe in the pic is a 1940 Super Eight, a recent import to NZ.

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Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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I'll add to the topic with a couple of images I shot last year. Here's my '59 Buick Electra with the Museum of Flight (Seattle) Lockheed Super Constellation -- the epitome of airborne elegance.

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These shots were taken this afternoon - 12 February 2012 - at West Melton airfield, just west of Christchurch, New Zealand. The occasion was an open day to remember that it was 50 years to the day that one of New Zealand's great aviation mysteries began, with the disappearance of a De Havilland Dragonfly on a sightseeing trip to Milford Sound. No trace of the aircraft or its passengers has ever been found. When you see pictures of the rugged terrain in the area it comes as no surprise. Another five aircraft have disappeared in the same general area in the years since.

Unfortunately the vintage Dragonfly aircraft that was supposed to appear at today's event suffered engine problems at its home base near Gore in Southland - about 250 miles south of Christchurch - but there were a few other De Havilland aircraft there, including the Tiger Moth in the picture and a couple of Chipmunk trainers. Also, a De Havilland Vampire jet fighter did a fly past. The local Vintage Car Club was invited to display cars at the event and about 100 turned up, ranging from a Holsman and an Alldays and Onions, both of 1905, to cars of the 1970s.

The two Packards in the picture are a 1930 733 sport phaeton which was restored in the 1960s and still looks as good today as it did then - and is still owned by the same person, and a 1937 115-C six, one of only two rumble seat coupes to be imported to NZ in 1937, which has just been returned to the road after 40 years in storage. Behind the coupe in the pic is a 1940 Super Eight, a recent import to NZ.

so, that De Havilland was "Gone With The Wind"?

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Thanks nzcarnerd for adding to the mix; make those pics black and white and you'd think they were done when the "Mystery" first occurred!

And Brian, I'm glad you added your stunning '59 Buick and Super-Connie images, too. What took you so long?

Now we need to see some of your Jet-Age 707 imagery!

Thanks to all for the vintage pics, too!

Here's an establishing shot of the scene that day, with the "Miracle on the Hudson"

Flight 1549 Airbus A-320 in the hangar.

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Larger

Flying back to Charlotte yesterday from the AACA Nat'l. Meeting, the DC-7B now shares

the tarmac with a couple of Air National Guard C-130's. CAM Director Wally Coppinger

wasn't kidding when he said it's going to be a long time before another photo-op

presents itself to capture the DC-3 and DC-7B en plein air.

TG

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

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Thanks nzcarnerd for adding to the mix; make those pics black and white and you'd think they were done when the "Mystery" first occurred!

Thought was given to turning the whole assemblage around so that the modern buildings and cars were not in the background but time was against us.

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Thanks nzcarnerd for adding to the mix; make those pics black and white and you'd think they were done when the "Mystery" first occurred!

And Brian, I'm glad you added your stunning '59 Buick and Super-Connie images, too. What took you so long?

Now we need to see some of your Jet-Age 707 imagery!

Thanks to all for the vintage pics, too!

Here's an establishing shot of the scene that day, with the "Miracle on the Hudson"

Flight 1549 Airbus A-320 in the hangar.

pa_9max.jpg

Larger

Flying back to Charlotte yesterday from the AACA Nat'l. Meeting, the DC-7B now shares

the tarmac with a couple of Air National Guard C-130's. CAM Director Wally Coppinger

wasn't kidding when he said it's going to be a long time before another photo-op

presents itself to capture the DC-3 and DC-7B en plein air.

TG

That long shot is great!!!

Awesome. Thanks for posting.

PP

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In the hanger in the photo above you can see the "Miracle on the Hudson" Airbus A320-214 that made an emergency landing in the Hudson River on Jan 15, 2009. This is now part of the collection in Charlotte. The DC3 was out of the hanger to make room to attach the wings to the A320.

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Edited by 61polara
Post photo (see edit history)

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Inspiration comes from strange places, and for my Airplane/Automobiles series of images,

it originated with this vibrant '41 Mercury center spread from LIFE, Nov. 25, 1940.

Though certainly not the first car ad to use color photography, it's an early one that

really pops, and one of my all-time favorites.

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Larger, photo from my ad collection (can't afford a large, flatbed scanner!).

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Larger, shown here in UAL livery, the Boeing 247 was a very advanced aircraft in its day.

The images bespeak post-Depression, prewar American prosperity and optimism.

:)

TG

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TG, the Museum of Flight has a beautifully restored Boeing 247 in the United Airlines livery, as shown in the Mercury ad. It would be great for a Mercury owner to reprise the ad with a new high-resolution digital image.

By the way, I think that your photos of the '57 Roadmaster and the DC-3 and DC-7 are poster-worthy!

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Hi everyone. This is my 1st post. My name is Ayden and Vintage buicks are in my blood. I could not resist posting this picture. This is an AT-6G Harvard (Texan from your part of the world). It used to belong to the South African Air Force but is now under syndication in New Zealand. Parked around it are 1936,37,38 Special Sedans.

Enjoy,

Ayden.

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Greetings Ayden, and welcome to the Forum. Great image of the Texan and the vintage Buicks! Please refresh my memory...were the RHD Buicks assembled over there, shipped equipped with RHD, or converted once they arrived?

Thanks for the cool 1st post,

TG

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Hi TG.

I believe they were sent to the GM plant and assembled RHD. At no stage would they have been fitted with any LHD gear.

Regards,

Ayden.

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NZ's Buicks in the 1930s were all sourced from Flint and most - all Special four door sedans - arrived as CKD packs. A few coupes were imported fully assembled along with odd examples of Roadmaster and Century which I presume would have been to special order - all with RHD. Buicks sold well here with approximately 200 or so being sold each year - 1935 to 1939. They had also sold well through the 1920s - figures I have show that there were 1205 new Buick registrations in 1925 which was 6.5% of the market, but it trickled back from there down to 3% in 1930. The list also shows 34 new for 1932 and 15 for 1933 but I know that no new Buicks were imported in thsoe years. The figures would be for slow selling 1930 or 1931 models. The later 1930s figures represented about 1.5%. Due to the onset of WW2 the 1939 models were the last to be imported. After WW2 currency rectrictions meant that very few Buicks were imported.

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I have been for many flights in that T-6 and it is nothing short of amazing. The Harvard has to be my all time favourite aircraft.

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This photo does not include a car but I noticed the enthusiastic comments regarding Harvards above so thought you might like to see this one owner example.

It was purchased by the RNZAF in 1942 and is still owned by them in flying order.

Photographed two days ago at RNZAF Airbase Ohakea.

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Birmingham has a group calling themselves the confederate air force and one of their members takes regular flights over my neighborhood in a T-6. Love the sound and the thrill never lessens to run out in the yard and watch her fly by.

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I posted this in another thread but here it is for your enjoyment.

1937 Buick Special and Dakota DC3/C47.

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