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33 packard in-line eight


martinzpack
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Pretty common characteristic of older engines. You have to drop the crankshaft and remove the pistons from the bottom. Or, depending on how high the piston will come up, and on how the wrist pin is installed, perhaps you can remove the wrist pin and get the piston out that way. Best advice is to pull the engine and go through everything at the same time.

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Your pistons will NOT come out from the bottom even if you remove the crankshaft. You need to unbolt the cast iron center section from the aluminum crankcase and pull it up off the pistons. I'm not sure if the pistons will come out of the bores far enough to remove the wristpins. We've never done it that way. Reassembly is the reverse: Install the pistons and rods from the bottom of the cylinder section then carefully lower the center section onto the crankcase. Do you intend to turn the crank? Packard engines were this way at least thru '37.

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Speaking of which...

If you ever come upon a crack-free cast iron center section for a 1931 Super 8, let me know. I don't need the cast iron topper part that covers the pistons, but if the cast iron center part comes with it (especially if the letters HC are on there), that would be okay too... and I don't need the cast iron side part where all that hot air comes out... or for that matter, the cast iron side part where cold air enters the cast iron center part.

How's that for eloquent? <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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Well guys I have a '31 and what I did was push the Piston far enough up topside knock pin out then remove the rod through the bottom side. Yes, it was tricky getting rod over crank but what I found was if crank was in the right position the rod would drop out. I did this all by myself but I do recommend having your buddy or something to hold the rod up from bottom. I learned the hard way because I was new to this also some of my rods fell and chipped some of the Babbitt bearing but I didn?t worry to much because I was going to have new Babbitt poured anyways.

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You install all 8 pistons into the block from the bottom and then carefully lower the block with its 8 dangling con rods onto the crankcase while trying not to damage any of the con rod bearing surfaces or crankshaft bearing surfaces. You have to rotate the crankshaft so you can line up the rods as you lower the block into place. Sounds more difficult than it actually is.

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Resorter,

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">carefully lower the block with its 8 dangling con rods </div></div>

I heard this on my '31 rebuild, but what if you do not have an engine lift. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/frown.gif" alt="" /> How else can we do this procedure?

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I'm assuming your speaking of the 3-3/16 bore "standard" Eight. Unless the engine is removed from the car and/or the bores removed from the crankcase, you remove the lower rod cap, push the piston far enough above the block (don't forget to cut the ridge) to remove the piston pin, and then remove the piston from the top and the rod from the bottom. If the engine is still in the car, this is about a 3 or 4 man job, remembering that the piston pins are a 160° F palm push fit.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Or maybe a couple of good friends with gorilla arms <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> </div></div>

Or maybe just one 7-foot-9 herdsman friend from Inner Mongolia with 41.7-inch arms. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

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I did it by standing the engine on flywheel End, then working the piston rings into block one at a time, since they are are at different heights, in relation to block, it's not too difficult with a good ring compressor. It would have been much easier with 2 people, but I did it by myself by using wooden braces and blocks to hold everything in place. I only used a hoist to raise the crankcase on end and to lower the assembled engine back down on engine stand.

That way the block is not suspended above, swinging around over your fingers. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/shocked.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

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I'll reiterate "Packin31" --- All you need to do is push the piston and rod assembly up until the wrist pin clears the top of the block, remove the wrist pin, pull the piston up through the top and remove the rod through the bottom. You do not need to remove the block from the crankcase nor remove the crankshaft. It's not all that hard. Reassembly is just the reverse --- rod up from the bottom, piston from the top, then insert the wrist pin. Well, it's not exactly easy, but it can be done and is how Packard intended it to be done. There was even a special tool in the form of a pin to help line up the piston with the small end of the rod so the wrist pin could be driven in.

--Scott

'26 238 Phaeton

'32 902 5-p Coupe

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