DaveCorbin

McLaughlin Information

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Dear Glenn:

I can tell you that the serial number you give is for an engine made at Flint. Where it went from there is generally impossible to tell, except if it went into a USA Buick, it would have the prefix 4 (for a Special) stamped ahead of the engine serial number. Lacking that, it could be from a McLaughlin, but it could also be an engine furnished to an ambulance or bus builder or for service, as they didn't get prefixed either. I don't know if this answers your question, but it's the best I can do.

Regards, Dave Corbin

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Hi, I just bought a 1937 McLaughlin Roadmaster 80c Convertible in Canada and brought it to Germany. To get it registered here, I would need some documentation on technical data (dimensions, weights, engine, tires, max speed, etc.). Is there a source that I can access or is there anyone who can send me a file with the data. Your help is much appreciated.

Christian

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attached is a chart I started on soem time ago about Mclaughlins it needs lots more work but perhaps others may like to add there knowledge to the mix and eventually we will all have a completed chart. Please keep me in the loop if you ad information to the spreadsheet... my expertise in on the 1919 light 6

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I don`t see that the file got attached... if anyone is interested drop me a note and I`ll email it to you

Thanks

Don

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I don`t see that the file got attached....

To add images / files on the bottom of the screen

1) Click on 'Go Advanced'

2) On the to row of your reply box you will see a paper clip. Click on it

or

on “attach files manage attachments" down the screen-.

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7) From the 'Manage Attachments' window click on 'Upload'.

8) Close the 'Manage Attachments' window.

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Be sure to check on the upload screen they are attached by scrolling down

There is a file size limit. Medium or large files will not upload. Have also read there is a limit of 2000 pixels when posted as an attachment You can also add images to a gallery. Check your User CP (Control Panel)

For graphics software to resize images (and much more) try IrfanView - Homepage - one of the most popular viewers worldwide. Free to download with many features. Easy to use.

Edited by 1939_buick (see edit history)

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Don,

Spreadsheets may not be allowable file types, so it may not attach.

I'd like to see your work - you can send me an e-mail by clicking through "Thriller".

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Dave attached is a picture of my '26 McLaughlin Buick Model  26-20 data plate.

 

Wayne

 

DSC05991.jpg.3e60d901bf92fc8fce146b6035ee2840.jpgDSC05947.JPG.a7d2c9f435dcf5385ff46dac5e2a5d8b.JPG

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4 hours ago, McCargar said:

Dave attached is a picture of my '26 McLaughlin Buick Model  26-20 data plate.

Wayne

Unfortunately Dave Corbin passed away on  August 25 2012.  A sad loss to pre war Buick people

 

 

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I hope someone has picked up his information and is maintaining it!

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I have what Dave assembled for McLaughlins, but it isn’t much aside from numbers produced for a given year - the original material did not break down production into specific models.  So I can provide total numbers of McLaughlin production by year.

 

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On 7/14/2019 at 7:16 AM, Spinneyhill said:

I hope someone has picked up his information and is maintaining it!

My understanding is "No"

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On ‎7‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 7:37 PM, 1939_Buick said:

My understanding is "No"

 

It is still around, but there is discussion on where to place the information to the betterment of all and not for a person or organization to make a profit from Dave's work.

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9 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

It is still around, but there is discussion on where to place the information to the betterment of all and not for a person or organization to make a profit from Dave's work.

 

Amen to that. 

 

Sharing and helping is at the heart of this hobby. Dave helped scores of people. 

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Not intending to crash this thread, but I'm looking for serial number and model information on 1916 and 1917 McLaughlin Buicks.  A friend has recently purchased what is believed to be a 1916 touring car with a six cylinder engine.  He's telling me that the ownership for the car identifies it as a 1917.  I have yet to see the car but hope to some time this week.  I'd like to be able to help him identify his car properly.  Thanks,  Kevin McCabe

 

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Kevin,

And when you do see this car, take plenty of photos and especially good photos of the engine from both sides.  I will be able to tell you if it is a 1916 or 1917 chassis from the photos.  Buick exported completed chassis to McLaughlin and they built their own bodies for their cars.  Also, try and get clear photos of the frame tag (under the left headlight on top of the frame) and engine number (stamped into the aluminum crankcase at the number 1 cylinder location on the manifold side.  The car can be identified from these two numbers rather quickly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Hello Terry

 

Finally got out to see the car today.  The emblem in the rad shell identifies the car as a "McLaughlin" only.  

 

The chassis number on the end of the left frame rail is 362509.  The engine number is 350405.

 

Also found a McLaughlin tag on the toe board immediately ahead of the shift and parking brake levers.

 

It indicates the model number as E45.  It also lists the engine serial number 350405 (so it appears to have its original engine) and shows a serial number of 22527.

 

It does not mention the chassis number at all.

 

Is 22527 the serial number of the body?  Or would McLaughlin have considered it to be the serial number of the car itself?

 

Not sure how many files I can attach to this note, so I may post more replies.

 

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

 

One last question:  Is it possible to get a photocopy of the owner's manual for the car?  There was no documentation with the car and the new owner (not me) is anxious to learn what's required to bring the car back to life.

 

The original vacuum tank is still present but has been bypassed and an elderly looking electric pump seems to supply gasoline to the carb.  The rear wood spoke wheels appear to have been newly replaced with much sturdier spoke that those on the front wheels.  The rear wheel hubcaps say "McLaughlin Buick" while the front only say "Buick".

 

Kevin

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DSCF9112.JPG

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Hi Kevin

 

I am looking through the data in the back of "Cars of Canada". It lists "E" series cars as 1918 models.There is an E-6-45 and an E-6-45 Special.The Special had natural wood top bows,nickle trim,and a walnut dash with a special storage compartment. The wheelbase on 1917 cars is 115 " and 1918 cars 118 ". Horsepower rating went from 45 in 1917 to 60 in 1918. The book only gives serial numbers starting in 1923.

Hope this is helpful.

Jim

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Kevin

Looks like yours is a 1918,  Serial numbers for 1918 E models ran from 343783 to 480995.  Yours having serial number 362509 would have been built in late 1917 as Buick started building their 1918 models in August 1917.

Edited by Rod Wise (see edit history)

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Kevin,

Thanks for the photos.  As the others have said, the car is a 1918 model.  In looking at the engine photo I have this to say - for being over 100 years old the engine is in remarkably clean condition.  I have looked at engines in this era that were so junked up and caked with dirt and grease that it was almost impossible to tell just what was what.  The thing that just stands out like a sore thumb is that water return tube on top of the block.  That tube is in wonderful condition.  No rusted out holes, not big dents, not patches to close up leaks.  I would love to see more photos of the rest of the car.  The frame number of 362509 is in the first lot numbers of 358787 - 375786.  These lot numbers were specific for the model 45.  The engine numbers for the 1918 6-Cylinder models were 343896 - up.

Here is an interesting tidbit about the engine numbers - the model E-49 had engine numbers of 320782 - up.  Haven't figured that one out yet.  There was an EX-45 (the x denoted export) also.  However, this frame tag does not include the 'x', so, this means that the chassis that were sent up to McLaughlin were not considered exported as were the cars that were sold in the rest of the world.  My longtime friend, the late Terry Dunham, imparted that bit of information to me many years ago.  My opinion of the engine serial numbers for the model 49 being earlier than the rest is due to the fact that the model 49 was introduced at the beginning of the 1917 models production but was designated as a 1918 model.  I think that this had something to do with materials allocation during World War 1.  Terry and I talked about that at length several times.  This was an extremely complicated time in the automobile industry and the U.S. war effort.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Edited by Terry Wiegand
GRAMMAR (see edit history)

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4 hours ago, Kevin McCabe said:

Don't seem to be allowed to upload additional photos?

When you upload photos to a post, they forum software downsizes the files upon upload. Even though it will not allow you to upload additional photos, you can go back and edit the post and attach additional photos without a problem. As soon as you reach the limit again, save the edited post, and after the software downsizes those photos, you can edit it again and upload more photos to the same post.

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14 hours ago, J.H.Boland said:

Hi Kevin

 

I am looking through the data in the back of "Cars of Canada". It lists "E" series cars as 1918 models.There is an E-6-45 and an E-6-45 Special.The Special had natural wood top bows,nickle trim,and a walnut dash with a special storage compartment. The wheelbase on 1917 cars is 115 " and 1918 cars 118 ". Horsepower rating went from 45 in 1917 to 60 in 1918. The book only gives serial numbers starting in 1923.

Hope this is helpful.

Jim

To all of you who have responded to my inquiry,  thank you VERY much.  I will attempt to upload more pictures so keep your fingers crossed.  Based on the equipment found on an E-6-45 Special, I can provide the following additional details.  The car has a front bumper but the front vertical face appears to be painted silver. The remainder of it is black.  The headlamp bezels appear to be nickle.  The rad shell is painted black.  There is what I took to be an accessory spotlight mounted to the left end of the windshield frame.  The switch for this lamp is mounted to the lamp housing and the rear of the lamp body has a round rearview mirror mounted in it.  There is also a second panoramic mirror mounted inboard of the lamp.  This lamp, its fittings and the pan mirror are all nickle.  The soft top has natural wood bows.  The rear flexible three section window in the top has a nearly square center section with the two outer sections having the upper outboard corners radiused.   The top material looked to be white at one time and is now quite yellowed.  The owner is going to try and clean the top to see if it can be brought back closer to white.  A second complete top was also included with the car.  It is fitted with material that to me, is a very early version of vinyl.  Quite thick but still having some flex.  The window in this top is an elongated hexagon with the top and bottom sections curving inwards towards each other.   The steering wheel rim is wood and in good shape for its age.  The throttle and spark levers as well as the quadrant appear  to be nickle.  A small rectangular plate appears to have been added to the center switch area of the I/P.  It contains an ammeter as well as two toggle switches which may be ignition and the starter.  There were no keys with the car so this may be a workaround.  The I/P does seem to have a woodgrain panel affixed to it.  There is also a small wooden compartment in the lower center portion of the front seat back.  There is a key for the lock on the compartment door, stamped "4".  The key seems to operate the lock, but the compartment door does not open.  There is a rim wind clock mounted in the "gauge" area, central to the I/P.  The speedometer/odometer/trip odometer is also present and in the bottom center section is some sort of sight glass that is rather oily.  Is this something to indicate oil flow through the engine?  

 

Along with the elderly electric fuel pump supplying gasoline to the carburetor in place of the vacuum tank, I could not find a port on the engine that would have been the original vacuum source for the tank.  Other than that, I was confused by the mounting system for the manifolds.  A stud mounted in the cylinder head carries a fingered clamp that holds the exhaust manifold in place and there is a further piece that seems to hold the intake manifold to the head via the exhaust manifold.  Finally, at the curve from the exhaust manifold to the exhaust pipe, there is a round hole in the manifold casting which provides a small view of the manifold inner details.  Should this hole be plugged?  No attempt yet has been made to start the car so how this hole will affect engine operation is not yet known.

 

There is no rear bumper on the car and from the looks of the framework immediately behind the fuel tank there would either have been rear bumper brackets attached or the mounts for (one or two?) spare rims.

 

More pictures to follow

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DSCF9142.JPG

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13 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Kevin,

Thanks for the photos.  As the others have said, the car is a 1918 model.  In looking at the engine photo I have this to say - for being over 100 years old the engine is in remarkably clean condition.  I have looked at engines in this era that were so junked up and caked with dirt and grease that it was almost impossible to tell just what was what.  The thing that just stands out like a sore thumb is that water return tube on top of the block.  That tube is in wonderful condition.  No rusted out holes, not big dents, not patches to close up leaks.  I would love to see more photos of the rest of the car.  The frame number of 362509 is in the first lot numbers of 358787 - 375786.  These lot numbers were specific for the model 45.  The engine numbers for the 1918 6-Cylinder models were 343896 - up.

Here is an interesting tidbit about the engine numbers - the model E-49 had engine numbers of 320782 - up.  Haven't figured that one out yet.  There was an EX-45 (the x denoted export) also.  However, this frame tag does not include the 'x', so, this means that the chassis that were sent up to McLaughlin were not considered exported as were the cars that were sold in the rest of the world.  My longtime friend, the late Terry Dunham, imparted that bit of information to me many years ago.  My opinion of the engine serial numbers for the model 49 being earlier than the rest is due to the fact that the model 49 was introduced at the beginning of the 1917 models production but was designated as a 1918 model.  I think that this had something to do with materials allocation during World War 1.  Terry and I talked about that at length several times.  This was an extremely complicated time in the automobile industry and the U.S. war effort.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Hello All

 

One other question I should have asked.  The "serial number" on the plate on the toe board indicates the serial number of the car as 22527 and not the six digit number on the plate on the end of the left frame rail.  22527 is also shown as the vehicle serial number on the ownership.  Is 22527 the serial number of the BODY?   If so, was it common practise to use the body number to register the car rather than the chassis serial number?

 

Thanks,

 

Kevin   

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There is an interesting Youtube video of a 1918 Buick engine running. You will see the oil sight glass on the dash functioning. Google "1918 Buick E45 engine running".

Jim

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