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1909 Sears Horseless Carriage


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My brother and I inherited a 1909 Sears Horseless carriage and are in turmoil if we want to restore or sell it. Is there anyone out there that has restored one? What were the challenges and costs involved? It is in poor condition. We have all the original paperwork, the plaque with serial number and almost all of the parts.

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My father has a 1909 Sears that I grew up with. I remember when he was restoring that car. I always liked the Sears. It is a fun car to play with.

You would be supprised to find out how many Sears' are still around. More than you may think, but not a huge number, so it is a rare car.

Most likely it will cost more to restore than it will be worth when it is done. It seems that the highwheelers do not seem to bring a lot of money, if that is what you are interested in.

Challenges to restoration will be finding parts you may need.

But I will tell you that a Sears is a fun car to drive. Good for a parade since it is air-cooled. I have logged many miles in my fathers. It is a blast. I have not driven it in years due to a loose rod. I will try to attach a picture to this email.

My advice is to keep it and enjoy it. Once it is gone, it is gone. I hope to have my dad's Sears some day.

Happy Motoring.

John

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  • 1 month later...

It will probably run you $15,000 to restore it right and $2,000 a year to keep it that way,.... depending on what goes bad, but they are worth it, too bad that the last one I saw really sell only brought $17,500. I would say keep it, but that is just my opinion. I am trying to buy a 1907 Holmes for $7,500. They will probably take it by Dec.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'd rather have the Haynes-Apperson, better engine, but tends to eat valve springs, but have you ever seen a car that will still hillclimb with one cylinder and a stuck spring? I saw a 1903 HA do just that a few years back,... I don't know of another original that would have done that! What are you asking for the Haynes, and what year is it?

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  • 7 months later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: IndianaCarGuy</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will probably run you $15,000 to restore it right and $2,000 a year to keep it that way,.... </div></div>

Restoring a Sears should not be an expensive project. There isn't much to them. As for $2,000 a year to keep it restored, that is ridiculous. My dad has owned his Sears for 40 years, and I'm pretty sure he doesn't have $80k invested in it. The Sears is a very easy car to own. It's easy to maintain, and cheap to keep. If it has the later engine, it will also be very reliable. They only built 3500 cars, and there has to be over 1000 surviving. That says something. Attached is a picture of my dad and his Sears.

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  • 2 months later...

What a great piece of history!

Here's a way to put it to good use. I produce the Texaco.com web site, and we're taking submissions through September 3 for our Texaco Car of the Decades online contest. Please visit our site at www.TexacoCaroftheDecades.com.

Registration is free, and prizes include a VIP package to the Daytona 500, $500 in free gas, and an automotive artist's rendering of your horseless carriage.

Thanks. I'll answer any questions you might have.

- Dan

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