Jump to content

How to start


47Buicker
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys...Just wondering something here, but how is this 47 buick started? I didn't get any keys with it, but the ignition was left in the on position. I only see LOCK, OFF, and ON. there doesn't seem to be any start position. Is there a starter button on her somewhere? When I get around to being ready to start it, I want to be able to do it...right? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest imported_MrEarl

wooo hooooo, boy do we have a Ford and Chevy man here or what? <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

47, this is a "classic question" of first time Buick owners. The starter "button" is activated by pushing the accelerator pedal. An accelerator vacuum switch is mounted on the throttle body of the carburetor The switch housing has a horizontal cylinder barrel through which vacuum from the engine manifold is applied at one end by passages in the carburetor bodies. This end of the barrel is provided with a washer that forms a seal to prevent leaks when a piston and spring is drawn against it by vacuum. The opposite end of the barrel is vented to outside air through a fine mesh screen and felt washer held in place by a washer and clip. A flat slide actuated by an operating lever engages a bakelite contact guide. The upward movement is opposed by a heavy contact guide spring. The contact guide carries the U-shaped spring contact that moves up and down to engage contacts for opening and closing the cranking motor control circuit.The throttle is closed and the switch operating lever holds the slide in the upper position, holding the U-shaped spring contact away from the contacts in the terminal cap. When the accelerator pedal is pushed down, this causes the operating lever to move away from the slide, allowing the contact slide and U-shaped spring contact to be in a position to bridge the contacts in the terminal cap, thus closing the circuit. The slide moves into the deeper of the two grooves in the vacuum piston. When the engine starts and the throttle is allowed to close, the slide and U-shaped spring contact is moved upwards by the switch operating lever, opening the circuit.

With the slide in the "up" position, manifold vacuum pulls the vacuum piston inward until it seals. When the throttle is opened past the idle range, the operating lever moves away from the slide and is forced downward by the contact guide spring until it strikes the shallow groove in the vacuum piston. This acts as a stop and prevents the switch contacts from engaging while the engine is running. The switch must be set at a specific throttle opening. If contact is made too early, the throttle will not be opened sufficiently to start well. Too late, and the throttle will be opened too far and might cause gear crash, as well as hard starting due to unloading of the choke by the throttle mechanism.

Got that..... <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/confused.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> Certainly more than you asked for but now you know.

and hey, just wait 'til he looks under the car and tries to figure out "what kind of drive shaft is that"?

Just havin some fun here 47 don't ever take ol MrEarl seriously!!! <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your head hurts...man, I've been here a while and listening to Lamar rambling, but I think this is the most serious and long-winded I've ever seen him.

I have a couple cars that start with the accelerator pedal (assuming they actually start), but I think that was more than I needed to read...I was lost after the first sentence or two...mind you, the wine probably isn't helping <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/wink.gif" alt="" />

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other safeguard against the starter engaging with the engine running is the starter solenoid being grounded through the generator armature and brushes.When the generator is charging both ends of the solenoid coil are at the same voltage potential so no current flows .This can also be the cause of an inoperative solenoid if there is no path to ground due to worn out brushes ,dirty commutator or a defective armature. So, now you have the rest of the story if this applies to your car as this is the system used in my 39. Didn't mean to pile on but thought this could be useful in a starting problem.

39Buick82Stag.jpg <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/confused.gif" alt="" />

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought the car [stag] new in 72 and it only has 33K on it so the motor runs like new however English engineering thought the water pump should go under the V-8 intake manifold in the block and be driven internally like the oil pump which is external.Brilliant !!! except its leaking coolant under the manifold so thats a project for the late fall.Its great handling when its not parked in my garage waiting another repair. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boy, I thought that I was beginning to understand the starting of a Buick, but now I am totaly lost. Apparently my 37 Special had trouble with the starter mecanism and this was solved by installing a starter button under the dash. Well and good. I have a later model carb which has a switch on the carb rather than the vacume switch on the manifold. I intend to use it as a replacement for the original and had hoped to use the switch on the carb to actuate the starter relay. However, since I replaced the generator with a one wire alternator that doesn't begin charging until it is reved up does this mean that I can not wire the carb switch into the system and use it for starting?

Rollie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rollie ; The vacumm from the manifold was only used to prevent engaging the starter when running .The switch was on the carb not on the intake manifold and yes, you should be able to use that with your alternator by grounding your solenoid directly ,not through the alt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...