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Hi Deb -

Gabriel Snubbers were an early version of a shock absorber that worked on the concept of dampening chassis jolts with a web belt wrapped around the axel and connected to a stiff coil spring and gear assembly attached to the frame - all of this for each wheel. Here's a pic of one - http://clubs.hemmings.com/clubsites/wokr/gallery/96tou1b.htm

I've got a set of four for my 1923 Dodge that haven't been installed yet. Need to refinish the exterior cans and replace the webbing.

Don't understand your question about the windshield.

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Hey Thanks! We could not figure out what it was at all.

The windshield we don't know what the VV was.

On the paper it says what was supposed to be on our car. It says "Price includes, tool, jack, spare tire, front snubbers, integral sun visor, VV windsheild, headlight dimmer (double filament)and dash gauge."

We were trying to figure them all out and when I first asked the question I did not notice the front part on the snubbers.

Deby

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  • 2 weeks later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">O,K, What are they? It says our car came with them but I don't know what they are?

Another question what is a VV windshield?

Thanks

Deby </div></div>

Snubbers were used to control the "jounce" or "rebound" of the springs on rough, uneven pavement. They did nothing to control the compression of the spring, but slowed the return to normal ride height, and reduced the tendency of the springs to "overreact", thus providing one action of shock absorbing.

Art

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Hey George -

There was a fairly comprehensive article in Skinned Knuckles many years ago about how to restore snubbers. It was also reprinted a few years ago. If you're interested, I could copy it for you and either fax or mail it.

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I do have some of old Skinned Knuckles magazines here. If you can let me know what issue, I'll look to see if I might have it. If I don't it would be great if you could copy and send it to me (it might be better quality than a fax).

Thanks,

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In relation to a car of the "20's, a VV windshield seems like a double-hit typographical error. A V-windshield is centrally divided with three posts, the central placed sometimes as much as 6-10" forward of the outside ones. They were probably used more often on European cars. There used to be a 1923 Isotta Fraschini with a Sala body at Harrah's which showed it well, and quite a few sporting FIAT Tipo 510S of the same period had them in the theme of their sharply pointed "Mercedes"-type radiator. It was also fairly frequent in sedan form on the smaller Rolls Royce of the late '20's, perhaps sometimes less elegant than the open cars. My father had one in the 1940's, and none of us liked it much. I guess it would seem diferent till you got used to the angled glass. The only car I have with one is a 1923 6 cylinder 6litre cuff-vale Peugeot, which is an oddity few people are aware of. It was their top car, but only 180 were made. A friend who had one as an everyday car in the mid '40's compared it more than favourably with an Isotta and an Hispano Suiza which he owned in the same period.

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The VV windshield must of been on the roadster model of ours because we have nothing on the dash. Thanks for the pictures and all the help on this! Very interesting!

Debby

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Debby:

To the best of my knowledge, Hupmobile did not use Fisher bodies in 1927. The windshields were a single pane of flat glass. The "VV" windshield in question, in my opinion, as it pertains to 1927 Hupmobiles refers to the "Ventilating Vision" windshield.

To summarize my post to you that was on the general discussion forum a month or two ago regarding the Hupmobile Vision Ventilating windshield:

There is an air vent approximately 1 inch high between the top of the dashboard and the bottom of the exterior windshield frame - it runs the full width of the bottom of the windshield frame. Inside the car, there is a window crank above the windshield. If you crank it, the windshield glass should straight up a few inches. If you crank the windshield part way up, it will allow air to go into the vent - the air will vent down behind the dashboard toward the floor. It helps keep the passenger compartment cool, especially your feet (which is helpful due to the heat coming from the engine compartment).

If you crank the windshield glass up as far as it will go, the vent will be open and there will also be a space between the bottom of the windshield glass and the windshield frame which will allow air to be vented toward your chest.

My father owned an extremely low mileage, unrestored 1927 Hupmobile six cylinder four door sedan for approx. 30 years. He sold it approx. 10 years ago.

Erik Johnson

Minneapolis, MN

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Well we found the crank for what we think is the venting but it won't move! I put WD40 in it and Mystery oil but nothing! Got any idea's on how to free it up! There is no crank as it missing just a spindle thing where the crank was.

Thanks for you help!

Debby

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