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56 Control Arm Bushings


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The Service Manual states that two types of bushing assemblies were used in the upper and lower control arms:

rubber bushings - not serviceable and replace control arm as an assembly

threaded bushings - serviceable

It appears given my better than Vegas odds of 50%, my control arm bushings are of the non-serviceable rubber type not threaded. Has anyone attempted to replace/convert their non-serviceable bushings to the threaded type? My senior definitely got 50 years out of the originals but it is time for some fresh bushings.

Thanks,

Robert.

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"Has anyone attempted to replace/convert their non-serviceable bushings to the threaded type? "

Altho i would prefer the threaded type it would be necessary to obtain Clipper control arms to convert to threaded. My vote is to just replace the rubber bushings if that's what your car has. That's what i did on my Executive. The statement in the book that they are not replaceable is field service gimmick. They ARE replaceable and i have replaced them at my own hand.

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I have a friend with a Caribbean who has a lot of experience with V8 Packards. He has stated he has never seen a bad lower bushing when they were torn apart. The exterior gets a little ragged but the internal rubber stays in fine shape. The upper bushings on senior cars are the same as Lincoln early 50's. PackardV8 has given a modern parts number in the 55-56 XREF thread. The uppers can be pressed in with no problem. Craig said he had uppers and lowers replaced in his 55 Pat.

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Thanks Randy.

My lowers match your description exactly. They look rough around the edges but if the middle rubber is most likely good I will leave them be. I will replace the uppers with the modern equivalent.

Regards, Robert.

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Thank you for the detail. I was not aware that the Clippers had the threaded only. I will replace the uppers with the modern equivalent and keep the lowers as they are for now. I own a 56 Caribbean Convertible.

Regards,

Robert.

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Just the Clipper Deluxe with non-TL suspension in 1956 has screw in bushings as far as I know. The upper control arm bushings on the rest are the same as early-mid 1970's Ford LTD/Mercury Marquis and I bought mine at Autozone for about 5.00 each in 2003. Perfect fit and I think I listed the part number on 55-56 X-ref. My lower control arm bushings on my 56 Clipper Super HT were just as described. No wear on the inside and ragged on the outside. I never found a replacement bushing for the lower control arms and they would have to have their rivets drilled out and be completely disassembled in order to change them anyway.

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BH wrote:

"Yet, I'm confused about your mention of swapping ends of the cross shaft to compensate for lost adjustment. I had read that the mounting holes of the UCA inner shaft were drilled of center so that it could be unbolted and rotated 180-degrees about its center to give another half-degree of camber."

Thanks for the correction. After reviewing the manual i determined my post about "swapping ends" of the shaft was incorrect. I deleted the post.

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The lower control arm would have to be disassembled (rivets removed) because the mounting bosses of the cross shaft are too close to the bushings to allow for any pressing. Dave327 and i studied this issue about 2 years ago. No big deal drilling out the rivets. Replace them with nuts and bolts. DO NOT weld.

The upper control arm is a different story. The mounting bosses on the cross shaft are sufficiently far enuf away from the bushings to allow them to be pressed out and even the shaft removed.

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General thot on bushings: Keep in mind that the upper control arm is subject to nearly no load nor road shock at all compared to the lower control arm. The upper is pretty much just going along for the ride. It's the LOWER control arm and bushings that take nearly ALL of the beating.

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