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248 cu in oil dip stick markings


Guest 1937RHDNZ

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Hi all, I am in New Zealand and have recently aquired a 1937 Special Series 47, this is a right hand drive model, which possibly was assembled here in New Zealand. I have quite a few questions but would just like to ask a simple question first. My engine oil dipstick has the 'stop' piece broken off, and therefore slides right into the block, giving a meaningless reading. could somebody please tell me the distance from the FULL mark to the 'stop' on the dipstick, so I can weld on a new piece, Thanks

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Guest DaveCorbin

Dear 1937RHDNZ:

First of all, welcome aboard!! I have been researching frame and engine numbers on Buicks for several years and would appreciate it if you could send me the engine number and the frame number. The frame number is on a small oblong tag usually affixed on top of the frame rail just behind the battery. (It's difficult to see, you'll need a flashlight.) The engine number is stamped into the right side rear of the engine on a US LHD engine, but both numbers might be somewhere else on a RHD car. Any other numbers from a Holden (Australia), Lendrum-Hartman (Great Britian) or McLaughlin (Canada) tag would be useful and appreciated. I would expect numbers in the range of 2,999,947 to 3,219,848 for the frame and 3,166,225 to 3,396,937 on the engine. Tell us USA guys more about your car so we can help!!

Regards, Dave Corbin

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Thanks for that, such a quick response. I can work with metric or imperial as New Zealand only went metric in 1967 and my schooling was prior to that!

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Thanks Dave for your interest, more than happy to help as much as I can. I have registration papers only back to 1965. The car was restored in 1989, I have only had the car a few months, and my wife & I just love it. I bought a Buick because there are so many late 30's Fords & Chevs here, I just wanted something better and not so common.

The chassis number is 3039120, and the original motor was 43218402. I assume the motor was replaced in 1989 as it now carries number 43334801. I am working on contacting the 1989 restorer, not having much luck as present as his name is Smith and he may have passed away.

I hope to put some pics on a personal website soon, will keep you informed. Thanks once again.

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Guest tin knocker

I just got to thinking further on your situation. I noticed that the stop on my dipstick is loosely attached in order to sit in full contact on the block. If you weld it on this would not be able to occur and no matter how careful you are it will not set perfectly against the block and it may allow oil to be slung out through the dipstick opening. If my memory serves me right some of the older cars had a leather washer beneath the stop to prevent this. You may want to take this into consideration when repairing yours.

Rollie

ps. In fact I am not too sure that mine shouldn't have one.

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Thanks will take all that into account. Any chance of a clear image so I can recreate as close as possible. There is no great hurry as the stop flange, I suspect has been broken off for some time.

Cheers Neil

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Guest tin knocker

You might try the buy/sell. I am sure that someone must have a junk motor and would sell you a dipstick.

Rollie

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Guest DaveCorbin

Dear Neil:

I looked your numbers up on the list I have re-created from Buick factory information and have the following input: Frame number 3039120 was manufactured at Flint around the middle of November 1936, so it's a fairly early 1937. The frame number range for that month was from 3025989 to 3047014. The number you cite as the original motor number (3218402)is within the range of engines for that same month, which ran from 3195546 to 3220570. The number you give as the engine presently in your car (3334801) is from a 1937 Buick from Flint, but probably built in May of 1937, or about 6 months later. You should be aware that the 4 preceding the actual motor number represents the series of Buick that the engine is actually for, as follows: 4=40 series, 6=60 series, 8=80 series and 9=90 series (in 1937). If you had a Century 60 series, it could have been restored with an 8 (80 series) engine, but with a Special that mistake is not possible.

I assume that, since you didn't mention it, that your car doesn't have a McLaughlin/GM of Canada plate. You've got a rare piece of Buick history sitting in your garage! It's one of only 205 1937 Model 47X cars built. As an RHD car, it's even rarer as 47X cars would include LHD cars shipped to LHD areas other than the USA. Incidentally, the oldest Buick that I can document as being shipped to new Zealand is a 1907 Model D from the Jackson, Michigan, Buick plant, so your car arrived about 30 years after the first Buick.

Regards, (or Cheers!), Dave Corbin

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Guest DaveCorbin

Dear Neil:

One further comment about export Buicks that will leave our USA guys gasping. Virtually all model X cars, sedans included, have LEATHER interior trim. Here in the USA, leather trim is normally seen only on convertible models. If you send me the numbers off of the body data plate mounted on the firewall by the engine, I can decode those for you also. they will say: "Trim code xxxxx" and "Paint code xxxxxx". This will allow me to tell you exactly how your car looked new, which might be of some interest. Also, does your car have sidemount spare tyres? A special code stamped INTO that plate also could indicate radios, or even a single sidemount spare. Before all my Buick buddies rise in revolt about a single sidemount spare, I've actually seen one at Hershey 2 years ago on a 1940 Special!

Cheers, Dave Corbin

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Great news and thanks Dave. I see Walter Miller is selling Buick production sheets on ebay and I have been reading the 1937 tallies for the export 47X. I noted that they appeared in very low numbers. I have also been told that the 41X was the most common/popular model here. A 205 production run is indeed a lot lower than I expected. I understood that the early Buicks were landed CKD and assembled at the GM factory at Petone which is just out of Wellington. The sad bit is, my ID plate is missing, I know where it is supposed to be, and the 2 holes are there.

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

I meant to mention in the last reply, that the car would now seem to arrived in NZ as a drive away from the wharf. Some notes on the 1965 rego sheet indicate that the car was possibly first registered in NZ on the 14 Dec 1937, which seems somewhat late given the early production build of the car even taking the 12 week odd shipping time to NZ. The seats are vinyl from the 1989 restoration I can't find any remants of leather but expect they would have been from new. As mentioned the body plate is sadly missing. The car is painted black and this would appear to be its original colour as well. Spare wheel is in the trunk, what we here call the boot. No sidemount tyres, no heater, or signs of, no radio, no opening rear quarterlight windows. I have added a pic of the dash. The orangy cloth speaker grille will be changed for something more suitable. I also have recently aquired a United Kingdom glove box handbook, it has some amendments regarding oils etc tipped in and an original 1937 large shop manual to get myself 'up to speed' on the workings of the car.

post-45230-143137891082_thumb.jpg

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Guest DaveCorbin

Dear Derek:

My reference materials tell me that 1937 colors for leather interiors were: (trim code/color) 302/Black, 303/Tan, 304/Gray, 305/Green, 306/Blue, and 307/Red. Black paint was paint code 500, which had the rather interesting name (considering where you are) of "Imperial Black". The wheels would also be black with a stripe of "Roi Gray". Some paint charts give Duco mix formulas, so you might be able to check colors. Do any of the leather colors I've given you match the vinyl color in your car? It might be a strong clue. I think it is possible to get an original looking data plate made to replace the missing one. Cheers, Dave Corbin

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Guest DaveCorbin

Dear Neil:

I'm corresponding with "derek" on another thread on this forum and got things crossed up on names. The information in the prior post is reliable, but my memory is ??. Please accept my apologies!! Thanks, Dave Corbin

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Hi Neil,

Your car was restored by John Smith (really) of Papamoa, Tauranga.He is now deceased but Paul MacDiamid of Rotorua gave major assistance with the restoration. He could be contacted via N.Z. Buick Enthusiasts at letsbuick@hotmail.com The car was for sale at Te Puke Vintage Auto Barn after John's death for $16 K and went to Taranaki from where you purchased it.

Most N.Z. Buicks were supplied with leather upholstery, but I have seen a low mileage 1938 61 Sedan that came with Bedford Cord.

On another note my friend has a 4 cyl. 1923 roadster that was one of eight exported that year, and it was parked at the same location as another of the eight during the North Island Centennial Rally, Hawkes Bay, Easter 2003.

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Guest 1937RHDNZ

Maybe you could contact me please, my email address is in 'my profile' 1937RHDNZ. I would appreciate that. Regards Neil

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