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Loop or Cut Pile Carpet on 53 Buicks?


Guest imported_JPIndusi
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Guest imported_JPIndusi

In my last post, I found out that the 53 Specials had rubber on the front floor and carpet on the rear floor. The Roadmasters evidently were carpeted in front and rear.

Does anyone know if they used wool cut pile or loop pile in 1953?

thanks - Joe, BCA 33493

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Hi Joe,

I'm not sure if it was available in 1953, but the 55's had Daytona Weave. This is available now, I have it in my 55. It costs more, but it looks much better than either of those other two carpets you just mentioned. I got mine from http://www.classicroad.com. The owners name is Rolf, really nice guy. It fit perfectly and is 100 times better looking than the loop pile I installed about 10 years ago. (not because of age)

Mike

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Guest my3buicks

Joe, I'm not sure you can really call the carpet of that era cut pile or loop, I guess if I had to choose between the to terms I would say loop, but it was a very tight close to the nap, almost needle point. There are several manufacturers out there that reproduce the different syles available then. You should be able to do some searches on the web and find something.

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Hi Joe,

Technically it is a loop, but Keith's assessment of neeplepoint looking is very accurate. It is a very tight, short weave. If normal loops are maybe 3/16 " this one is closer to 1/16". Again, I'm not sure if that is accurate for your car but I would imagine it is. Also you really have to look for it. The $129 carpets that some companies sell will cover your floor and look good but if you are going for originality you have to ask for Daytona weave specifically. I think the price is about double that, so that can also be a factor. I can guarantee that cut pile is definitely wrong though.

Mike

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So this thread has got me thinking of what weave I should put in my 58 Century convertible, to be "correct". I'd like to use the Daytona, but is that a "correct" weave for my car? I seem to remember that this was put on the performace-oriented GM cars, not sure if Century counts as that.

Not that being "correct" is my only criteria, I just want to make an informed decision. If not the Daytona then it would be the 80/20 Rayon/Nylon, which I think has more of a "tough" feel to it than the straight up Nylon. Is the 80/20 more like the wool that they used to use originally on the non-Daytona loop pile?

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Doh! Thanks for checking wit him - I'll have to give him a call and talk to him about it some more. This is actually good since I like the Daytona. Now since I can't get it "correct" anyway, I can go with modern loop or Daytona and still be OK! wink.gif

Mark

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Guest my3buicks

You may want to do some more digging - I believe ( but not 100 percent certain on this one) that the upper series may ahve used "Tuxedo" weave (Limited, Roadmaster), but the other series may still have used Daytona - if we can find some low mileage original 58 owners to pop in here it could help - there are companies that are making the "Tuxedo"weave.

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Mike,

Well...I can't drive it there. But I do need to make it to the show and I can bring pictures.

I have had this car 6 years, and there has been so much rust repair and parts collecting to do (I got it sans front clip for example) that I still have not put an engine in it yet. The frame and body were twisted a bit too, with door alignment problems on one side and decklid alignment problems. But it's a Century convertible.

Good news is, rust repair is all done, windows all rebuilt, parts collecting 99.9% done (you chase the last .1% forever I think), and alignments resolved/frame straigtened. Time to start assembling. I also spend parts of the past year COMPLETELY rebuilding the convertible-only rear seat frames, including grafting pieces onto the rusted-away frame, replacing all sinuous springs, and bending all new edgewire. I don't want to even think how much I would have had to pay to get that done, but then again I also do not want to think about how much time and torture it was to do the work. But I am satisfied!

Starting to see the light...

Mark

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Guest imported_JPIndusi

I called Jim at Quality Auto Carpet and he said that the Daytona Weave, a tight loop type carpet was first used on Buicks in 1954. For my 1953 he said the cut pile was correct, but of course rubber in front on the Special. He could just as easily sold me something more expensive , but he said the closest I could get would be cut pile. It will look very nice I am sure, compared to the somewhat ill-fitting loop pile carpet on the car now.

Joe, BCA 3493

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58 Roadmaster and Limited used a long, cut pile carpeting with a foam backing for plushness and sound deadening. It looks very plush and thick and is called deep pile carpeting in the 58 color trim book. 58 Centurys used Pompano nylon carpeting. No carpet samples in the color trim book that year.

If you can find an old upholstery shop that still has the Detroit Book for that year, Pompano should be sufficient to see what a sample looks like for matching purposes. The Detroit Books were/are an upholstery industry swatch book that showed samples of almost every piece of material used on every US manufacturerss cars for a given year, along with codes, supplier numbers, etc. They were always very expensive so only jobbers and major upholstery shops bought them. Very hard to find now but worth the search.

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