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AZscott

Need help identifying age of V12

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Hi All,

How do I ascertain the year of a V12 engine? I have a 41 Continental that came with a V12 that is not the original. I am attaching a photo. On the rear of the driver's side head is the word "Zephyr". The numbers on the drivers head are 6H-6050 and the numbers on the passenger side head are 6H-6049 with a small plate below reading 14-6. Also the Driver's side head has a flat raised cylindrical bump where the heater valve would go on a 1948 engine. Was this bump on pre war engines?

Thanks for your help!

post-37594-143137885465_thumb.jpg

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The engine appears to be a '36. The "6H" would indicate that. Are the cylinder heads aluminum? The carburetor and the left wiring conduit are also an indication of a '36 or '37. The bore and tappets will determine the year as most of the external parts will interchange to all V12's. The generator however appears to be the more modern type used on the 40's. One curious little difference is that the '36's originally used a little "ball" on the oil level float indicator.

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Guest imported_V12Bill

Dee, The prefix "6H" stands for Lincoln Zephyr. and was not used I believe until 1938. The date prefix for 36 was H and for 37 was HB after that the date prefix was the last digit in the year followed by 6H as in 86H for 1938 up to 26H for 1942. For 1946 and up it gets a little fuzzy. 56H was used to ID some 46 parts(was the initial design for the part in 1945?) and 66H for other 46 parts. In 1947 76H was used and in 1948 876H was used. Remember 86H was used for 1938 so it could not be used again for 1948.

To get back to the original question on the ID of the block, George Trickett gave a detailed explanation a few years back on the differences in the various years blocks on this site. I think he stated that there were no oil fittings in the left rear of the block for 1936, there were two oil line fittings for 37 to 39 and three oil line fittings for 40 to 48. There is a difference in the number of freeze plugs in the bottom lip of the block and their size. I think six plugs 36 to 41 and 7 for 42 and up. Also the Large freeze plugs have a larger casting bulge in the side of the block for 42 and up. Post war blocks have a

56H cast into the bell housing top. On tear down the 36 to 39 block had a bore of 2 3/4 , the 41 and late 46 to 48 had a 2 7/8 bore and the 42 and early 46 had a 2 15/16 bore .Just about all bolt on parts were interchangeable on all years blocks so a part number for a crankshaft or head would mean nothing.

Hope this doesn't put too much confusion into the formula.

Bill

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Guest imported_V12Bill

PS Many Lincolns had factory authorized rebuilt engines installed. It appears that they only used blocks from 1940 and up and usually used the 1942 and up crankshaft because it has larger rod journals. They seemed to have been turned .020 undersize. In a lot of the blocks that I have seen they were bored .020. Maybe they only had .020 pistons on hand and to speed up production of the rebuilding process used the .020 piston as a standard whether the block would have cleaned up at .005 or .010 or needed .020. Pans and heads must have been thrown in a pile and pulled out as needed although heads were almost always cast iron and 42 heads were used in pairs. Maybe someone with experience in one of the rebuilding facilities could shed more light on this.

Bill

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Wow. That's a lot of confusing information. I'm looking for a V12 to get my 1941 Zephyr Sedan back to original. How would I identify it? Please break it down for me.

Brad

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Guest imported_V12Bill

Brad, You would need a block with 3 oil fittings on the left rear side of block, I believe 6 freeze plugs on bottom lip of block and I think they were all the same size.Or you could use any year block as long as the bolt on parts were dated during the 1941 production year. 90% of the people looking at a block couldn't tell the difference anyway. Did 41s use 06H or 16H aluminium heads?

Bill

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THANKS ALL!

So is this a 292 Cubic inch or the smaller cubic inch?

I ask because I have this engine and a 1948 V12. Are parts available for both sizes or are parts more plentiful for the 292? Given that I do not have a 1941 engine for my 41 continental, which engine should I use?

Thanks,

Scott

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Guest imported_V12Bill

Scott, The 292 engine was built from 1940 to 1948 with the exception of 1942 and early 46. The 48 engine should have the larger rod journals so is more desireable. Look at your unknown engine and using the description that I gave above, you determine what engine you have.Unless you are restoring to 100 points it doesn't make any difference what engine you have. They all appear to be about the same from external examination.

Bill

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I own a 41 Zephyr that I am about to sell, its in near original condition, spent 30 years in a spud cellar in idaho! Runs beautiful! interior is aged and showing it , but you could drive this thing from coast to coast! 12,500.00 801-347-6366 paul

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