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1911 Buick model 14


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Hello,

The windshield frame slid over to the drivers side a couple inches (that is the second time this happened). Just tightening the frame clamps doesn't seem to work....

I'm thinking about a pin between the middle of the wooden ledge board and the bottom center of the windshield frame- it would not show from the exposed window

frame.

Thanks,

Joe

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  • 1 month later...

Joe : Sorry you were not at the Buick National. Your model 14 would have been a real show stopper. We did have 3, 2 Cylinder cars here. 2 Model Fs and a G. The 2 Model Fs were used to give rides the last 2 days. Tomorrow the Pre-war division is doing a 3 day tour thru Indiana and Michigan. Wish we could see you and the car on our way back to Penna. Larry

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Wow, wow, wow. How could such a little bit of car make such an impression? This kind of horseless carriage launched our great hobby, sixty years ago. Amazing to think that, in 1953, this Buick was just 43 years old. Heck, my Valiant is older than that and I drive it every day. Has automotive mankind made progress? You bet! And we are so lucky to have guys like Joe preserving history in such a compact and endearing package.

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Joe :

Just received my Nov/Dec copy of Antique Automobile. The photos of the Saturday Hershey car show. I see your model 14. I am sorry we missed you. My son and I were there on Friday and were so disgusted from the soaking we got that we did not return to the show on Saturday. When are you planning on showing the car again? We are planning on doing a cross country trip to the 2014 Buick Nationals may be we can stop by???

Larry

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Hello,

Responding to the question I had about the fanbelt I use on the model 14 engine- I use 3/8" diameter round leather belting from McMaster-Carr (p/n # 6170K16 @ $2.37 per foot).

The steel connecting staple wires are part # 184834 at .46 cents each. The belt joining tool (really cool) is #1848K1 and is approximately $70.00.

Buy extra staples and belting- you'll need it!

Thanks,

Joe

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  • 8 months later...

Hello,

The broken up brake lining was the molded strip type from McMaster-Carr. It had a high friction cofficent, but proved to be too brittle for a band application.

I'm going to try the woven strip type; it has brass fibers in it to dissapate heat. I bought the 3/16" by 1" wide strip and milled it down to 3/4" wide to fit the

bands.

Model14brakejob001.jpg

I'm also going to use a high temperature adhesive to bond the material to the bands. Just to play safe, I"ll rivet them again also.

Thanks,

Joe

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Joe:

Good Luck on that. I am sorry the previous material did not hold up. The brakes on my 1925 were done with the woven material and looked excellent. That is until I found out the previous owner had his "GUY" reline the brakes and install them with steel split rivets!

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Still sorry that we could not meet you this summer on our way to the Buick nationals.

This September we went to look at a 1910 model 10 runabout that was supposedly looking for a good Buick loving home. I made an offer, which was no where near what the 89 year old owner wanted. This was considering that it was sitting in a trailer for 3 years and was not running. On our first phone conversation, when I asked what the car was he said" what do you offer me". Not knowing if it was a runabout, surrey or touring. Restored? Newer, older, complete (who, what, why, when etc.) with very few relevant answers. On the phone he stated that it had a top. Upon inspection it did not and he said it never had a top, even though it had the fastener rail and prop bolts. It was restored by him in the late 1980s according to "FACTORY SPECIFICATIONS"??? It needed considerable freshening up. He wanted to start at $20K and "dicker up". So I tried to get close to his start point but I needed to drive it at that price. I asked if it would be running when we went to inspect it? All he would say was it started with one pull of the crank. Needless to say it was not able to be started when we arrived. Oh well we at least tried. I myself would love to have a brass Buick.

post-79073-14314285151_thumb.jpgHave a Happy Thanksgiving and keep us posted on your progress.

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Hi Larry,

The tops on these early cars were an option (they all came with the necessary mounting studs and retention knobs from the factory). As far as the brake lining, I use hollow shank

cartridge brass rivets. The lining is counterbored for the rivet heads. I made a rivet set tool that curls over the hollow shank of the rivet when hammered down.

Thanks,

Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
had incorrect information on rivets (see edit history)
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Model14brakejob004.jpg

Hello,

Bonded/ riveted brake lining on bands installed on spindle hub. I purchased a small oven to cure the adhesive on the lining to bands. The instructions with the

adhesive stated a curing temp. between 350 to 450 degrees farenheit for an hour to make the glue impervious to water. Needless to say, it got a little

smelly in the garage with a little haze in the air....:rolleyes:

Thanks,

Joe

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  • 11 months later...
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Hi Joe;

I just bought a Model 14 Buick, the exact one I rebuilt the engine in for a customer, back in 1974. Its the trunk style, not the round gas tank model. It is in older restored, running condition, and I will take delivery of it next month.  Its been over 40 years since I drove this car, looking for any information and pointers, PLUS one of your new carburetor floats, or just stampings thereof. I am a machinist, and can assemble it & make the mounting spud if need be.  Many thanx,  Jeff Beaumont.

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