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1911 Buick model 14


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Model%2014%20rolling%20chassis%20001.jpg

Hello,
I finally added the rear wheels and chains last week . I'll add the brake
and shifting handles and linkage in the spring. I ended up readjusting the
turnbuckles on the drag link rods to the trail axle as the new chains were
quite a bit shorter (I ended up repainting them anyway!).
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 9 months later...

Buick%20model%2014B%20body%20in%20primer

Buick%20model%2014B%20body%20in%20primer

Hello,
This year I prepped the new wood body for top coat; I used a catalast
hardened polyester spray-on surfacer. I still had some work with body
filler on the back of the driver side seat bucket to match it to the
passenger side. I also coated the floor boards, running boards and
battery box.
Then it was sand, sand and then sand some more!
Everything is at the paint shop now; I should have some nice photos
as I get things back....
Thanks,
Joe :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...

JOE, I am completely in awe of guys like you, who can repair, replicate or design and build from scratch just about anything for these magnificent machines. To me, the inner workings of a rebuilt transaxle are just as beautiful and inspiring as finished cars on the lawn.

Please keep posting - you've got me hooked. Maybe you could ask the moderators to change the heading of this thread. The word *DELETED* caused me to ignore this item for quite a while.

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Well, that was quick. I'm already pretty certain that my grandfather's one-and-only automobile was not a 1911 McLaughlin-Buick, as I'd been told. It was probably a 1911 Tudhope Model 30, the Canadian version of an Everitt, built in Orillia, Ontario.

Dang it, researching this story will keep me out of the garage this holiday season, for sure.

post-59990-143138380803_thumb.jpg

post-59990-143138380805_thumb.jpg

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  • 6 months later...
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Model%2014%20Buick%20top%20bows%20003.jp

Model%2014%20Buick%20top%20bows%20002.jp

Model%2014%20Buick%20top%20bows%20010.jp

Hello,
I attached the brass window frame and the steel top support iron (unpainted)
to the seat buckets. I was then able to hang the new oak top bows from the
ceiling; these were c-clamped to new bow sockets so the final length of the
bows could be determined.
The bow ends were then band sawed to the socket taper; corners were
rounded with a small hand held belt sander. The finish shape was filed in.
All bow ends have a nice tight fit into the sockets- about 3 boofs of the
mallet...
Thanks,
Joe :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...

JOE, that top bow is very delicate looking. Did you cut them out of a plank or did you bend them (with steam?) from small stock? The slight taper on those bow sockets must must have been a challenge to fabricate. I like your units of measure - how many kiloNewtons in a boof?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Rob,

I bought the bows through Antique Auto Top Hardware Company. They were

rough cut steam bent oak. I was not sure what the finish length of the bows

were, so I had them sent with the ends uncut as they come out of the

bending fixture.

(Note: A boof is equal to 4 bangs or 8 taps.)

Thanks,

Joe :D

Edited by MrEarl
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  • 4 months later...

Buick%20model%2014%20lower%20window%20fr

Hello,
I finally got up enough gumshion to install my new pieces of safety glass into
the brass window frame halves. I bought some 3/4" wide cloth electrical tape
(perfect width for this application), and applied it around the perimeter of the
glass. I then used a piece of 3/16" thick aluminum flat stock to run around the
inside of the brass channel which is inserted into the frame (opening it up as
much as possible).
I used some liquid hand soap on the taped glass edge to lubricate sliding on
the channel.
Only a couple of slight crunching noises during the process, nothing big :eek: :rolleyes:.
With that done, glass/channel slid easily into the frames.
I used a razor blade to trim the excess tape overlapping the brass channel.
A whole lot of small projects now...
Thanks,
Joe
 

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
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  • 5 months later...

Buick%20model%2014%20transmission%20amp%

 

Hello,
Shown are the transmission, clutch and brake linkage being test fitted before paint. All clevis holes on the link rods were reamed oversize for larger
diameter clevis pins. The outboard frame mounted bracket had to be shimed with all four corners of the shim plate being different thickneses. The
brass transmission mounted inner support had to be sleeved and re-bored to a different angle bushing hole.
I did run the engine a couple of times this summer. It needs a sheet metal guard over the flywheel to prevent oil spray before I run it
again! :rolleyes:
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
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Welcome, class, to Buick 101. Years old, that is! I love the balloon strings, great way to lift the car for service. I'm recognizing things - cylinder head, water pump and fan, magneto - but in a configuration that's very unfamiliar. Clearly, 1911 was still too early for the industry to become standardized.

Magnificent.

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  • 2 months later...

modified%20Remy%20mag%20001.jpg

modified%20Remy%20mag%20002.jpg

modified%20Remy%20mag%20003.jpg

Photo of the Remy magneto before installation. I gutted out the innards and machined a cavity whithin the magnets to accept a Kubota tractor single phase
alternator (visible in the bottom photo). I ended up using a Yamaha 400c.c. motorcycle engine voltage regulator/rectifier to get a D.C. voltage for the coil.
There was enough room inside the wood coil box enclosure for both a NAPA Eichlin coil and the voltage regulator.
I fired up the car last Saturday- I'm getting 6.6 volts across the battery when the motor is revved to cruising RPM.
That made me a happy camper! ;)
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
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Thank you all,

I hope to drag the car up to Hershey for the fall 2013 show. I just have to trim out the car (running boards, floor mat and misc.).

I also should replace that crank case breather with something that does not spray oil all over the windshield!

Thanks again,

Joe

Edited by MrEarl
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Joe, what a wonderful job and pictorial/essay. I also never followed this thread because of the Deleted in the title. I had no idea you were doing this gorgeous detailed work. And I loved the sound of that engine in the video too. Truly, a joy to see this all come together after this length of time. Thanks for starting and continuing this thread.

I am looking forward to the pictures as the Buick is trimmed.

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Joe:

Yes I believe the best place for an initial showing should be at the BCA meet in South Bend. I am planning on being there. And since I will also go to Hershey I would have the pleasure of seeing it twice! Don't forget I signed up for a ride!

Larry

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So Joe,

you got your PhD in Mechanical Engineering WHERE? Dude you make everything sound not so much simple, but just an every day typical thing you go out to the garage and knock out in a few hours. When we all know it takes a genius mind plus days/weeks and my Lord what PATIENCE. So I'm curious, if you don't mind sharing, what is your mechanical background.

scheblerfloatoildie001jw2.jpg

Out of frustration with trying to seal a cork carburetor

float, I machined a die to hydroform two halves of a float

from .005" thick brass shim stock.

I found that I needed to limit the travel of the brass whithin

the die cavity between drawing and annealing of the blank;

shown to each side are inserts made from 5 minute epoxy which

fit whithin the steel die cavity.

The upper half of the float has a threaded brass lug (4-40 tap

with a blind hole) for attachment to the float arm.

I tried out the float in dad's model 10 Buick- so far no

leaks!...

Thanks,

Joe

model14steeringboxgearsf8.jpg

The center five teeth of the bronze segment gear on the

steering box had quite a bit of wear; I was able to silver

solder the top half of the worn teeth. I then re-faced the

gear in the lathe and cut all the teeth .070" of an inch

deeper. I used the good profile teeth at each end for grinding

a fly cutting tool as well as figuring out tooth spacing..

Thanks,

Joe

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Joe :

I know the feeling. I had worked for 7 1/2 years in a foundry machine shop. I loved working on the Bullards, LeBlonds, Cincinnatis

Hendeys, Warner Swaseys etc. If the place had not shut down(Combustion Engineering, East Monongahela Pa.) I would probably still be there. Instead I have taught Industrial Arts (now Tech Ed) for the last 28 years. I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up!

Keep At It!

Larry

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  • 1 month later...

Buick%20model%2014-Remy%20coil%20box%200

Hello,
After resetting the ignition to about 20 degrees before top dead center, I cranked up the engine. It ran so well I could not turn it off.:confused:
With the ignition switch turned off and the battery wires disconnected, the engine still idled strong with the current from the alternator!:eek:
I used a long screwdriver to short out the ignition circuit.

I will have to use the button on the Remy coil box as a kill switch; it is currently not used for anything.
This button was originally advertised in Buick literature as a "self starting" feature. When pressed & released, it would spark the ignition regardless of
where the engine was in its operating cycle. If there were still some cylinder compression (and you were lucky), the engine might fire up on its own.
(that is if it was just shut down).

Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 3 months later...

Buick%20model%2014%20test%20run%20005.jp

Hello,
I finally solved the oil spray problems common to the Model 14; I added a flinger ring and capture ring to the rear of the motor (part of capture ring and
mounting bracket visible in above photo).
The neat part is the hardware bolts right on without any modificication.
The flinger ring is in 2 pieces and tightens around the crankshaft flange (just inside of capture ring). The flinger prevents the oil leaking out of the rear
motor bearing from migrating to the flywheel. The captured waste oil then drains out of a 1/4 inch diameter piece of brass tubing at the bottom of the
outer ring (also in two pieces).

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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I tried out the float in dad's model 10 Buick

Wait a minute. I just noticed this when Mr. Earl quoted you on it. You have a dad?! I figured you to be about 99 years old, to have accumulated the skills to do what you are doing so achingly well. Your father must be the oldest person on the planet.

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Buick%20model%2014%20test%20run%20004.jp

Hello,

Shown above is the other half of my oil control setup..
I fabricated a brass crankcase breather and oil trap with a separate brass can beneath it. The bottom can collects the pressurized oil mist from the
crankcase and gravity fed oil from the capture ring at the back of the motor (through the red hose).
The waste oil can then be drained off with the petcock and plug at bottom. (I will replace the plug with another petcock.)
It was surprising to see just how much oil was being collected which was otherwise sprayed on the front fenders and driveway!:eek:

Thanks,

Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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