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1911 Buick model 14


Joe Kieliszek
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  • 3 months later...
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Buick%2014%20rear%20wheel.jpg
next project was checking the runout of the brake drums; one wheel
gave me trouble as its center hub had been welded up and the locating
diameter for the brake drum wasn't running concentric with the bearings.
I ended up boring the locating hole of the drum and sleeving it.
Joe  :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 7 months later...

Model%2014%20transmission%20gear%20001.j

 

This gear was a little trickier; it has a 17 tooth internal gear which acts as a
spline to lock up with the driven side of the clutch for high gear. I first roughed
out the teeth by drilling and milling the tooth cavities before using a hand ground
tool with the tooth profile to broach the finish shape of the sides & outer edge.
It took a couple of additional passes around before the gear fit freely into the
clutch gear on all the teeth...
Thanks,
Joe  :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Model%2014%20gearbox.jpg

 

Everything fits even with the two gears "growing" slightly from the
flame hardening of their teeth. Also new is a screw in bearing carrier
for the pinion gear (bottom). I ended up using a Timken tapered bearing
with a needle thrust bearing behind it to replace the obsolete ball
bearing on the pinion gear.
Now on to the clutch and torque tube side of the tranny....
Thanks,
Joe  :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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Model 14 clutches are prone to "sticking" when engaged- so much that later
versions (including mine) have a spring loaded plunger which contacts the
side of the clutch unit to stop rotation.
So on the advise of another model 14 owner, I bought a "jackrabbit" clutch
disk set sold by a model T supplier. The disks are covered with a friction
material (on right) versus the old bronze disks to the left.
Model%2014%20clutch%20disk%20drum.jpg

The old disk drum had to be turned down by about .270" and the slots
milled back in to accomodate the smaller model T disks; also the O.D. of
the new disks had to be reduced by an eigth of an inch to clear the bolts
that hold the assembly together....
Thanks,
Joe  :)

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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Hello Joe,

I am a new member to the discussion forum, based near Dublin, Southern Ireland, I have the task of rebuilding a 1908 Buick (we think?)there will be many questions that I could do with answers to and judging by your experience you probably can supply the info?

Looking at what you have already done the engineering quality looks fantastic, I only hope I can come near it.

Most of the car is there but the outer clutch to gearbox drive unit and the flywheel square drive is missing and I have no idea what they look like to show the seller of the car what I am after.

Do you have any images of these items please?

Regards

Ian Anderson

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Hello Ian,

No photos of it on hand, but the original drive end is around 4-3/4" long. It is made from 1-3/8" diameter steel with a 1-1/8" square milled back about 4 inches. The center hole is 7/8" inside diameter with a 3/16" (I believe) drive key in line with a corner square. Make the lengths longer; they can always be cut back if need be....

Thanks, Joe

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Hi Joe,

Many thanks for the info, I will get a drawing done and sent the the machine shop.

Would you be able to tell me if you know of anyone who has a clutch cover + plates or complete assembly for sale?

As this part is missing I would like to modify it as per your clutch.

Regards

Ian

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  • 1 month later...

PittmanarmradiusrodarmModel14Buick.jpg

I was able to restore the diameters of the linkage balls of

both the radius rod arm (above) and the pittman arm (below)

minus .020". With a short bar of steel (at left)and a tube

of valve grinding compound, I hand lapped the link balls to an

even size (whithin .0015" on the diameter).

The bar has a 15/16" drilled hole in the end with tapered bore

out to the largest diameter of the link ball.

It takes a while; about .002 to .003" per hour by hand. It is

faster with the tool in the lathe, but leaves scratches in the

steel...

Thanks,

Joe

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  • 1 month later...

Schebler%20float%20oil%20die%20001.jpg

Out of frustration with trying to seal a cork carburetor
float, I machined a die to hydroform two halves of a float
from .005" thick brass shim stock.
I found that I needed to limit the travel of the brass whithin
the die cavity between drawing and annealing of the blank;
shown to each side are inserts made from 5 minute epoxy which
fit whithin the steel die cavity.
The upper half of the float has a threaded brass lug (4-40 tap
with a blind hole) for attachment to the float arm.
I tried out the float in dad's model 10 Buick- so far no
leaks!...
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
edit title per request (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Model%2014%20steering%20box%20gear.jpg

 

The center five teeth of the bronze segment gear on the
steering box had quite a bit of wear; I was able to silver
solder the top half of the worn teeth. I then re-faced the
gear in the lathe and cut all the teeth .070" of an inch
deeper. I used the good profile teeth at each end for grinding
a fly cutting tool as well as figuring out tooth spacing..
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek
edit title per request (see edit history)
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  • 5 months later...
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Model%2014%20spring%20snubber.jpg[

 

 

Making neoprene spring snubbers for the leaf springs. I was
able to "machine" a square pocket in the rubber using a flexible shaft Dremel grinder mounted to the Bridgeport
spindle. The small center hole in the neoprene material was opened up with a 1 3/8" hole saw in the lathe (drilling half way from each end). The rubber cuts off easily in the bandsaw
and the ends are squared up on a bench mounted belt sander...
Thanks,
Joe

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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Hello,
Making progress on assembly work; I set the motor in this week (minus the
flywheel). I can now center up the driveshaft/transaxle to the flywheel
mounting flange via the u-joint (not pictured).
I had a local boat top and tarp maker sew up a set of tire bags with velcro
straps; I'll be able to move the chassis around without scruffing up
the grey tires..
Thanks,
Joe
 

Model%2014%20frame%20amp%20motor%20002.j

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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  • 2 months later...

I've been sidetracked with a tedius but interesting project -replicating the
early style of drive chain used on the Model 14. One of the chains on my car
was old enough that it still had individual cotter pins on each of the connecting
pins between links (on one side of the chain only). The other end of the pins
has a low round head.
So I bought 2 ten foot lengths of number 60 drive chain; modern chain is
dimensionally identical to the old stuff. Using a chain breaker, I took apart
150 inches worth of connecting and roller links. Using carbide end mills, the
holes in these were drilled out to slightly under 1/4" (they were 6 mm).
I bought 200 hardened 1/4 inch clevis pins from Mc Master-Carr. These were
each drilled with a 1/16 carbide straight flute bit at the cotter pin location.
The clevis pin heads were then rounded off in the lathe (a lot of sharpening
of the carbide tool bits). The pins were sanded to length and champhered.
Then just add 200 cotter pins and you are ready to assemble...

Model%2014%20drive%20chains%20001.jpg
 

 

Model%2014%20drive%20chains%20002.jpg

Edited by Joe Kieliszek (see edit history)
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