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Dynaflash8

1941 Chrysler Royal Information Please!!!

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Rick: It's a six cylinder flathead engine, and the car has Fluid Drive, which is a semi-automatic transmission. It has a clutch, but you don't have to use it, except to go into reverse or from reverse to first.<P>On the other hand you can use the clutch and shift it like a regular standard transmission if you want to. Most people did shift them, or put them into second and then third to take off.<P>This was because they are extremely sluggish taking off in high gear. Some of the Fluid Drives, I believe, on Dodge and possibly DeSoto did require you to put them into second gear to take off from a stop, but I can't remember. <P>I had a 48 Dodge with it, but it seems to me I always heard that the Chrysler would do things the Dodge wouldn't do. And it's been so long ago I'm fuzzy on the Dodge. I really think you can take off from a stop in third if you're willing to deal with the slow start.<P>Otherwise the two-door is a neat model. I've been a nut for 1934-1949 cars since I was big enough to cut their pictures out of a magazine. I never saw very many of the Chrysler-Dodge-DeSoto cars in the two door model. I almost bought a 41 DeSoto 2-door in the mid-sixties and as I recall it had a very nice treatment of the rear quarter window that featured a chrome division bar.<P>The radios are neat in these cars as they are verticle in the dash. And the '41 Chrysler's featured a lot of pretty plastic that went to dust. That will be your biggest problem, along with the very neat floppy handled window winders. <P>I'm a Buick man, but let me tell you, those old Chryslers of those years were pretty driving cars, soft and comfortable. <P>The only nasty thing about them is the BRAKES. It takes a super-expert-mechanic to work on Chrysler brakes. Some mechanic's won't even try without the special tool that is virtually extinct today.<P>Good luck with your project. Wish you had it ready for the AACA Eastern Divisional "Sentimental" Tour this May. It would really fit right in.<p>[This message has been edited by Dynaflash8 (edited 03-07-2001).]

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Rick: I was just thinking. I know a super-expert mechanic who can fix anything, and that includes Chrysler Product brakes and he lives right there in York, PA (Manchester). If you need any help email me and I'll give you his phone number.<BR>

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It is a common misconception that Fluid Drive was the name given to Chrysler Corporation's semi-automatic transmissions. Actually, Fluid Drive refers only to the turbine and fluid coupling between the engine and the gearbox.<P>With Fluid Drive, the clutch isn't needed during braking or decelearation. However, the clutch is still needed in order to shift from gear to gear.<P>I think Fluid Drive debuted in 1939 as a feature of the Chrysler Imperial.<P>In 1941, Chrysler introduced its true semi-automatic gearbox, which was bolted behind the Fluid Drive unit. At Chrysler, this first semi-automatic was called Vacamatic. At DeSoto it was called Simplimatic.<P>After World War II, the semi automatic was modified. I believe the change had to do with altering the shifting mechanism from vacuum to hydraulic actuation. DeSoto changed the name of the transmission to Tip-Toe-Shift. Chrysler seemed to have overlooked naming the new version. Manuals refer to it as the M6 Hydraulic.<P>The '41 Chrysler is an attractive car. Beautiful interior and a smooth drivetrain.<P>Best Regards,<BR>Dave Duricy<BR>desoto@one.net <A HREF="http://w3.one.net/~desoto" TARGET=_blank>http://w3.one.net/~desoto</A> <A HREF="http://w3.one.net/~desoto/desotoland" TARGET=_blank>http://w3.one.net/~desoto/desotoland</A> <p>[This message has been edited by daveduricy (edited 03-08-2001).]

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Rick: I just remembered, I knew a guy from Orinda, CA who went to Texas about 20 years ago to retrieve his inlaws 1941 Chrysler 2-door and drove it back to California. Wouldn't it be a small world? Lee Greer was his name.

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I am soon purchasing a nice original 41 chrysler royal 2 dr sdn. I dont know anything about these vehicles. Can anyone please fill me in with history or any other info? I live near Hershey, so I may visit library there for additional help. Any info you have is greatly apreciated!<P>Thanks!<BR>Rick Stepina, York PA

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This thread interests me because I have a 1940 Chrysler Royal coupe.<P>Dynaflash: how do you know it's a six? According to the Standard Catalog, my '40 could have also had an eight. Did they drop the eight in '41, or is there some other quick way to tell that the car could only have a six?<P>This info about the trans is really interesting. Did they ALL come with that? Is it possible my '40 has it, or do I probably have a normal manual?<P>What's this special tool for the brakes?<P>You're not kidding about the plastic, I don't have a scrap of usable plastic anywhere in the interior.<P>Thanks!<P>Cheers,<BR>Bry

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For many years, Chrysler offered sixes and eights. <P>In 1940 and 1941, the six was standard in the Chrysler Royal, Windsor, and Windsor Highlander. The eight was standard in the New Yorker, Saratoga, Imperial and Crown Imperial.<P>It is my understanding that while a more powerful six was optional in the Royal and Windsor, no eight was ever offered in those model lines.<P>Chrysler continued to offer sixes and eights through 1954. In 1955, all Chryslers went to V8 motors.<P>Dave Duricy<P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bry in Virginia:<BR><B>This thread interests me because I have a 1940 Chrysler Royal coupe.<P>Dynaflash: how do you know it's a six? According to the Standard Catalog, my '40 could have also had an eight. Did they drop the eight in '41, or is there some other quick way to tell that the car could only have a six?<P>This info about the trans is really interesting. Did they ALL come with that? Is it possible my '40 has it, or do I probably have a normal manual?<P>What's this special tool for the brakes?<P>You're not kidding about the plastic, I don't have a scrap of usable plastic anywhere in the interior.<P>Thanks!<P>Cheers,<BR>Bry</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>

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While this is a two door model, it is a sedan style and not a coupe. Is it a desirable vehicle? I am paying 5950.00 including shipping from california to PA, does this seem like a good price if it is a solid three car that can be shown and driven? I cant find a shred of info on the web about it, no pics, tech data, or anything but what ive learned here. I do appreciate the help from everyone! Ive joined the web site, and you can be sure ill be a member at Hershey within the month as well! What a great bunch of people here!!<P>Thanks Again!<BR>Rick Stepina York PA

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Rick,<P>For '41, Chrysler offered a club coupe, business coupe, convertible coupe, and a 2-door "brougham." Sounds like you have the latter.<P>Base price for the brougham was $1,021. Chrysler built 8,006 of the bodysytle.<P>Value? Check Old Cars Price Guide and browse through Hemmings to see what prices are attached to similar cars.<P>Dave Duricy<P>

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I'm just back from the National Meet in Punta Gorda,FL, where there was a 1939 Chrysler Imperial 8 sedan on display. Wow, haven't seen more than one or two of them at a show in my 39 years in AACA.<P>I'm not a mechanic, so I can't define the brakes, except to say one 1934 Plymouth taught me one lesson. My regular mechanic would not work on the brakes. So, I switched mechanics and made a friend. The tool measures all three points of contact between the shoe and the drum. This was a very difficult adjustment on a Chrysler product. Without it, it was guess and by gosh. Some mechanics won't even try without the tool. You can get too much end, too much middle, etc. when you do it by ear, so it takes a lot of time and patience.

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