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Hershey '05


59chevyguy
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I have a 59 chev. convertible and I was suprised that one of the questions asked was why there was no hood insulation on my car. The 58-60 convertibles (model 1867) do not have insulation under the hood. This is stated in the assembly manual on the insulation page as "Except Model 1867".

We did get our first junior and are very pleased, even though it rained hard and their job was even more difficult.

Steven

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Steven is correct in saying the 59-60 Chevrolet convertibles did not have the hood insulation, the 61's did not have it either. The insulation was used as a noise barrier in sedans and hard tops. I think that Chevrolet realized that with the convertible top and the lack of any insulation in the top, a noise barrier under the hood was money wasted. This is clearly shown in the 61 factory assembly manuals and I suppose it's also shown in the 59 manuals, I hope they didn't deduct points.

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Steven,

Please understand that not every judge is a subject matter expert on each vehicle in each class. There was a case earlier this year where I had to Judge MG's and really don't understand MG's very well at all. Judges often get put judging areas where they're needed, not where their expertise is. I have had my own vehicles questioned by a judging team requesting documentation for the most obvious things that are factory.

In the case of someone like Ron Green, his '55 Pontiac has a razor, record player and curb feelers that are factory accessories. In my case, I thought that it was totally bizarre, but in the case of Ron's Pontiac, it is correct.

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Tommy, thanks for the backing. Please do not take this as a complaint but rather a statement. I fully understand that not every judge knows or is familliar with all cars but this issue with hood insulation has been around so long I assumed that it is a common thing. A friend of mine has 4 points deducted in Carlise because of no insulation which never came from GM to begin with and he was not asked ahead of time like AACA does. It semms that I have to explain this insulation issue at every judged show and thank goodness the AACA head judge asked before any deduction is taken. Some shows shoot first and ask questions later. Since I am bringing this up, should'nt this be addressed at Judging School?

Heck, I have a lot more to complain about than a point or two on insulation and it has absolutely nothing to do with the JUDGING. Judging at Hershey last week, in my estimation, was difficult at best given the extreme weather conditions and I do not have one complaint. I almost did not take the car out of the trailer due to the extreme weather but to drive over 400 miles and not compete would have been foolish.

As this was our first time there things did not go so well from an organizational standpoint. I will vent later in another forum about the HERCO people. No synergy between them and AACA folks. AACA says one thing and HERCO says somehting 180 dgrees differnt.

A special thank you to all the judges who judged my car.

Steven

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Steven,

There is actually a very strong relationship with HERCO! It is a year long collaboration that also includes a meeting each morning during the meet to deal with problems. Remember, the Fall Meet has a larger population than most cities! It is a massive undertaking with new problems cropping up each day and year. The CEO of HERCO even showed his car in the rain on Saturday. If you encountered problems contact "Mac" at the Hershey Region or me at aaca1@aaca.org and the region will try and solve any problems that you may have encountered. I suspect that what your problems were either due to a misinformed security person, weather or the proverbial snafu!

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Quote; "It seems that I have to explain this insulation issue at every judged show"

Unfortunately that is the way it is especially since your class may have different judges at each show. I can't count the amount of times I had to document my exhaust deflector and curb feelers, almost every show every year. It has gotten to the point that my copied documentation is wearing out, but that is just the way it is. The one judge just shook his head at the ladies purse holder.

As far as the HERCO issue of which I deal with them through work, this show in some of their opinions is more of a pain in the butt then it is worth.

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  • 2 weeks later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I have a 59 chev. convertible and I was suprised that one of the questions asked was why there was no hood insulation on my car. The 58-60 convertibles (model 1867) do not have insulation under the hood. This is stated in the assembly manual on the insulation page as "Except Model 1867".

We did get our first junior and are very pleased, even though it rained hard and their job was even more difficult.

Steven </div></div>

That's interesting about the lack of hood insulation on Chevy convertibles of this vintage. By contrast, a 60 Buick had hood insulation on all body styles and models, even the cheapest. (I wonder about Pontiac and Olds....?) Chevrolet must have re-thought it later, as 65-66 Impala converts did have hood insulation.

On another authenticity point, do judges ask you about floor covering? I understand colored rubber is correct for 59 Chevy convert, with carpet being first used on the 60 convert. I have been told the correct colored rubber is not made for 59s which explains why every example I see has carpet (like a closed car would).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for your answer. The 59 assembly manual clearly states on the page indicating the insulation "except 1867". 1867 is a convertible model. There is a 18" x 18" square pad between the cross metal under the hood for the convertible. No insulation on the 58 convertible is also correct.

I have researched this extensively with Chevy Talk.com, Classic Chevy and Late Great Chevy's as well as a few technical advisers and they all agree with the assembly manuals.

Do not know why Buick had it and Chevy did not. Maybe because Chevy was considered a "poor man's" car!

Steven

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I once showed a '33 Auburn for my former employer at Hershey. One Judge insisted that the Auburn's battery was in the wrong place, we must have moved it when we restored the car (Auburns of this vintage place the battery on the outer frame rail of the passenger side, under the fender, with a metal cover). She insisted that cars of this vintage should have the battery under the front seat (which is true of many Detroit products). We had to pull in another ACD car owner from our class to bail us out. That is the downside to multi-make judging. The most critical judging usually takes place at the various marque annual conventions. There you (may) have individuals who are very knowledgable about a particular make/model/year judging the car. This can be a good thing--there can be oppertunities to learn much about what is considered "original" for your car.

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I feel your pain 59 Chevy Guy, I think many of these incorrect applications are brought on by the people who sell the reproduction parts. A perfect example is this month in a publication that caters to our year Chevy's there is an add hawking a new "reproduction" 1960 continental kit. The funny part is how do you reproduce something that was never made, 59 was the last year for these. But for their monetary gain it is now considered correct. Now try to tell some guy who spent $2,000 for one of these that his car is incorrect!

John 348

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Hello!!! I have always found it a good idea to take as much documentation as possible with you to a judged show. early photos,origional advertising,assembly manuals,window stickers,before+after pctures,dealer order forms,etc. Judges do a great job at these events...BUT...They do not...and cannot be expected to know everything about every car. This would be almost impossible!!! You would need 1001 special judges!!! If you know you have an un-usual feature that might be considered to be "non-origional" but really is "Origional' it is up to you to show them to prove your point!!! I have found that most judges given proof will rule in your favor!!! This year the judges did a great job...IN THE RAIN!!! My hat is off to all who showed + judged in this fall Hershey event!!!

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