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Stoddard Dayton Carburetor


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Hi Folks,

New to this site, I'm interested in all sorts of automobiles. In the repair business for about 30 years, I've come across lots of interesting junk. I have a Stoddard Dayton Carburetor, which I shined up, and would like to identify it if possible. I don't really want to get rid of it, cause it's a nice artifact, but if anyone is familiar with these cars, I'd appreciate any info. Here's a picture.

Thanks,

Jerry

Drain, OR

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">WOW! The very FIRST Indy 500 pace car was a Stoddard-Dayton. The big ones had the most beautiful exposed overhead valve gear you'd ever want to watch. grin.gif </div></div>

If the carburetor is an indication, I'll bet the valve train is spectacular. Where did you see one run? I understand the museum in Dayton,OH has one car, are there others? Perhaps on the West coast?

This carburetor was found under the floorboards of an old house here in Oregon. No sign of the rest of the car though.

Jerry

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Jerry, This is the 1910 Stoddard-Dayton 50HP Roadster I saw run at the 1967 HCCA Fall Meet in Ridgefield, Ct. The late David Domidian owned it at that time, it was restored by Don Harter and is featured in the Jan-Feb 1961 issue of Antique Autombile. That 1912 Ford T on the left is mine now, the big station wagon is a 1914 Armleder.

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That Ferrari is too new to notice, the Matheson at Hershey was a great car. I've got this original Penny Havard artwork on the wall, a Matheson being gased with a mobil pump in front of the P.T.Barnum Museum in Bridgeport, Ct.

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The pictured carburetor greatly resembles the early glass bowl Stromberg units. I wonder if Stromberg built the carburetor for Stoddard-Dayton? Would be nice to know the lettering before the serial number on the side of the carburetor. I am unable to read it. Something "4". Stromberg used the identical type of designation, where there would be a letter (ie. A, B, C, etc.) followed by a capital N and a small o (their abbreviation for the word "number") followed by a number which denoted the S.A.E. flange size. A size 4 would be a 1 and 3/4 inch carburetor (bore about 1 and 15/16 inches) with a center to center spacing of about 3 5/16 inches on the two studs attaching the carburetor to the intake.

We do have records showing that Stromberg built carburetors specifically for other car companies; however the old files are incomplete, and there is nothing mentioned about Stoddard-Dayton.

Jon.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The pictured carburetor greatly resembles the early glass bowl Stromberg units. I wonder if Stromberg built the carburetor for Stoddard-Dayton? Would be nice to know the lettering before the serial number on the side of the carburetor. I am unable to read it. Something "4". Stromberg used the identical type of designation, where there would be a letter (ie. A, B, C, etc.) followed by a capital N and a small o (their abbreviation for the word "number") followed by a number which denoted the S.A.E. flange size. A size 4 would be a 1 and 3/4 inch carburetor (bore about 1 and 15/16 inches) with a center to center spacing of about 3 5/16 inches on the two studs attaching the carburetor to the intake.

We do have records showing that Stromberg built carburetors specifically for other car companies; however the old files are incomplete, and there is nothing mentioned about Stoddard-Dayton.

Jon. </div></div>

I think Jon may have nailed it--see pic. Thanks to all for the attached pictures and info. I've been curious about these cars for years. BTW the Ferarri is just a poster on my office wall.

Jerry

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"Some great cars"....that has to be the understatement of a lifetime! What a collection! Just the old race cars make you want to faint and the rest of the brass cars, all unusual, are terrific. Plus, Don is a great guy! Visiting their "Museum" is worth the trip Oklahoma City and Chikasha.

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