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I am interested in recommendations on reference material that gives the most accurate and concensed information on Henry Ford, the Model T, and the Industrial Revolution as well as Ford's impact on the American culture,workplace,and lifestyle. Much of this knowledge I have from fuzzy memory, but I would like to be able to quote reference, "scripture and verse", for a study unit in Transportation and U.S. History classes I would like to be involved in using this material and a Model T in a classroom setting.<P>I could also use some insight into where to acquire this material.<P> Thanks,<BR> Jim Uhl <BR>uhldwm@alaska.net<P>------------------<BR>Jim Uhl

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Start with your local library and dive into some history books on Ford and the Ford Motor Company. There is a lot of great material, and a couple that I feel are particularly good - find a copy of "Ford, The Times, The Man, The Company" by Allan Nevins. A fairly recent book "The Fords" by Peter Collier & David Horowitz is also a fascinating account of the Ford family. For info on the Model T itself, try "Model T Ford" The car that changed the world by Bruce McCalley. The AACA Library & Research Center would also be a big help and you can download an info request form on this website. I just took my 1914 Model T over to a local highschool and gave a talk/demo for an after hours hobby club, so Im certain a nearby club member might be willing to do the same for your project. Let us know where you are located and we'll see what additional help might be right there in your neighborbood.<BR>Terry

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Jim, one easy source is found on the home page of this site. It's a concise history of the automobile called Somewhere West of Laramie. Buying a vehicle for this project is good, but you might also check with nearby AACA regions and chapters to get them to support you with their vehicles.

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ronbarn:<BR><B>Jim, tell us what age group you are addressing. There are a couple of other references that might be useful if you are talking to elementary students.</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>U.S. History and Transportation, (Auto Shop)courses are in the High School. What I am after are more in the line of interesting facts that will peak the curiosity of students unfamiliar with this segment of our History. Hopefully, what will remain are interesting memories of how this all ties together and/or a desire to learn more. In total I would probably have one to two hours, maybe up to three, to present this material and go over the vehicle with the class. I am a retired teacher and do substitute work for the High Schools in my area as I still enjoy working with kids and believe the use of the Model T would certainly enhance what to many is a dull, boring subject, namely U.S. History. Especially up here, it is next to impossible for a kid to actually see, touch, feel, hear and smell one of these historic vehicles and my hope is that it will awaken a desire in them as to either preserving History or learning more about it.<P>At the present I do not even have the vehicle yet and will be going to the Portland Swap Meet in May as a guest of Bert Harrison, of Salem, Oregon. Mr. Harrison has kindly<BR>offered to help me locate and purchase a vehicle, either one he is working on, or one at the swap meet or belonging to friends in the area that will fit my needs. At the present time I am thinking that the transition era of 1915-16 would be ideal for my purposes, and at a later date I would like to also acquire a Model A to be used in the same way.<P>Thanks for your response and feedback, I appreciate it,<P>Jim Uhl

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