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What is high mileage anymore?


lancemb
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It used to be, that when a car got around 100,000 miles, it likely would need a complete overhaul soon. This is not the case anymore, and certainly not with Reattas, as many can attest. It seems as if people are still using the same basis for high mileage as years ago! Is this so, or what? What exactly is high mileage, and what does this implicate? I am very anxious to hear others' opinions!

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Interesting topic as I recently contemplated the same thing. It used to be that at 100,000 miles a lot of people would write a vehicle off as useless. One of the price guides (don't remember which) uses 12,000 miles per year as average. With the advent of overdrive transmissions and high quality engine parts used (due to the competitive nature of the automotive industry) I think 100,000 miles is nothing to be afraid of in a <B>properly maintained</B> automobile.

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This topic seems to be comming up more and more. I'm currently at 105,000 miles on my 90' and completly satisfied with it.<P>The way I see it, I'm stuck with the car. If I did decide to get rid of it, no one would give me what I know it's worth based upon the milage alone!<P>Over 100,000 is an old wives tale that will probably outlive us all. And in this day and age of leasing vehicles, the thought of purchasing a used one and maintiaing it up to 200,000 + miles is unheard of. (Allthough we're all doing it)<P>Consumer Reports ran an article on this very same topic last month. It comparerd the price of keeping and maintaining an old vehicle, in comparison to purchasing/leasing a new one.<P>Of course the cost figures inclued downpayment, maintenance, monthly payments etc. In most circumstances, the old clunker was the money saver in the long run.<P>I've just accepted the fact that my car is old and that by driving it, things are going to break down. So when it happens I don't cry.

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I think on of the big differences now is that the engines will go on and on. It used to be that the REALLY BIG expense was the engine at 100K or less. Now, all the other stuff seems to start to wear out but nothing with the cost of an engine. Much improvement has been made in engines and transmissions. Now, if we can get the electronics and suspensions to have more life, maybe we can use them for ever....just like airplanes..Many airplanes made in the 40s are flying every day and most airplanes made in the 60s and 70s are still flying. <BR>Anyway, I plan to still be driving my little red reatta when she turns 25.

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Guest jim_houston

I think you guys are all correct. The Reatta just looks great and seems to be (to most of us anyway) a "timeless classic". I totally agree with Darrin that things are bound to go wrong. Small things are happening to all of us now, but that is normal for cars around ten years old. To be honest, I think these cars in spite of the problems being reported, have exceeded their design in terms of serviceability. My car has over 120K on it now, and yes, I've had to put on new struts, tires, brakes, etc., and yes, I've had the typical problems others have had, headlight rollers, radio antenna failure, etc., but like Darrin said, it really is to be expected. And like him, as it breaks, I *try* (not always easy to do) to look beyond it and be more understanding.<BR>To best answer the original question: in my opinion, I think the magic number is 300K miles. You don't hear too many people claiming they have that kind of mileage on their cars but there are cars out there that have done it. The frames of these cars seem to be as strong as a full-size truck, and the cars were built so well that they should last a long long time. "Mileage" really isn't the factor any more. I look for how the car was maintained more than anything.<BR>Does it look nice, does it smell nice, was it taken care of? If the car was maintained well and taken care of, mileage is less of a factor.<BR>Jim Houston

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Guest Dolores

Love hearing about the performance of Reattas at high mileage. When I bought my Select 60 Convertible in 1996 it had 21,000. Now 68,000. I never want to get rid of the car...it's so unique.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My experience with about 20 in the last 15 years cars (certified car nut) has been much better with high-mileage cars. I've had some stinkers with less than 30K. Even my new cars have been a mixed bag. Everything over 75K has performed well above expectations. In the last 4 years, my 92 Riv has needed only a water pump and a fan relay. Its about ready to flip 100K. The Reatta convert I found for my dad has 85K and looks/drives almost showroom. The highest mileage I've bought is 185K. Drove it a year and sold it for a $400 profit.<BR>I think people make a big mistake assuming new or low mileage is a safer bet. If a car makes 100K, is burning no oil, gets good fuel economy, and has a smooth driveline it's probably good for at least 250K. Any major flaws will have shown up long before 100K.<BR>The best part is you can practically steal high mileage American luxury cars - at least in the Denver area.

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