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1950 Packard eight length?


ALKLB
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Nice car! The engine appears to be a 288in engine not a 356" as advertised. . The overall length of a 2301 is 204 5/8" according to my manual.

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i agree it is a very nice car. the price is high according to the price books but that is relative. i paid less than half than that for my 1949 but have since spent about as much as i paid restoring it and this has been with me doing much of the work myself. i'm impressed with the overall condition and it looks to be a #1. i don't see the color listed as one for 1949 but it is very pretty. looks like a keeper.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Nice car! The engine appears to be a 288in engine not a 356" as advertised. . The overall length of a 2301 is 204 5/8" according to my manual. </div></div>

I agree, hard to tell from the pix but it looks like a 288 not a 356. I don?t believe Packard ever offered a Senior engine in a Junior body as an option. I did see a ?53 Carib with a 327 nine main that was ?supposed? to have been specially installed for a Packard corporate executive. A look at the engine block serial number would determine what?s in it.

That aside, a very nice car overall, but if someone has transplanted a 356 in it that could be a judging gig unless there is original documentation to prove it left the factory that way.

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I saw a 1950 in the same aqua color and the paint was original. This looks just a bit different- more blue-ish than aqua but like Frank says buying one for less will result in putting probably the equal amount in it ultimately. Sure it's over the guide prices. California cars are all priced/valued higher anyhow I've found. Better to just pay more and get more. Do you want to drive it or putz around rebuilding it?

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My '47 is painted almost the exact colour and it is incorrect for '47 but I have seen at least one other 23rd series car with this similar paint colour. I agree that buying a car that is finished is the way to go even if it costs a little more than "book" As I have found out on more than one occasion the cost of a restoration usually exceeds the value of the finished car. As I grow older I am of the opinion that driving a car is a lot more fun than taking one apart bit by bit. The engine option of the 356" motor seems strange to me and the ad now says that the engine is a 288" which would be correct. I am not sure that a 356" would fit under the hood of a 120" wheel base car without modification to the rad cradle at the least. That extra 7" is in the cowl forward on the Senior cars for a reason.

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Yes, there are 2 extremes in the vintage car hobby. Those that are Collectors and those that are Restorers. I personally am a Restorer. To me the challenge of getting a rusted out hulk and restoring it to original condition is much more fun than driving cars that someone else did all the work and paying someone else to do the work for you. Restorers like to do as much of the restoration as possible (bodywork, paint, upholstery, etc). <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

Now, I see why I get very little response to forum posts pretaining to restoration information and questions. <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" /> LOL <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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Rick, There are also many between the two extremes you mentioned and I consider myself one of them. I do like to restore and also like to drive them. I admire a person like you that has the skill to do all that is required without outside artisans to restore a car correctly. Unfortunately I have neither the skill or equipment (or patience either) to do much more than buff and shine. To pay an artisan to do the work is what makes restoration a losing proposition monetarily but I am blessed with enough money to do just that. <img src="http://www.aaca.org/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

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