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Little things that will cost you.


Shop Rat
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I am always surprised by the filty, pitted, beat up radio antennas. By roof gutter rails that are rusty or coated in wax that could have been cleaned up. Or non-matching headlights, they should match by brand name and era within the brand.

While these might only cost a point each, one point can keep an owner from getting the award they could have had. Because you might make the minimum, but if you didn't make the ten point spread from the highest scoring car then you go into the next award group.

Also, non-authentic plates and frames on the front and/or rear of the car. Again, not many points off but why give them away? Plates with names and such on them are fine for local shows but should be removed for AACA shows. Same with excessive stickers on windows.

So please check those items on your cars for the next show and correct any that you find. We do not take any satisfaction from deducting points, ever.

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Good points there Shop Rat.

Since I do chassis a lot, Please make sure you have the correct valve stem caps too. I see enough 40's era cars with plastic caps. Plastic is not acceptable unless 1951 or newer. That is an easy 4 or 5 points because it is 1 point per cap.

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Real good point Bob. You and I are especially sensitive to the spark plug stuff I know. I have a friend who judged at a local event a while back and encountered a Model T with four different spark plugs in it. He deducted three points. Gave the owner benefit of the doubt by "assuming" that at least one of them had to be right.

Terry

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You could afford to give up a few points with that T-darned nice car! You do plan to bring it to the Old Dominion Meet right?

Terry

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WIthout digging out my old issues of the Ignitor (publication of the Spark Plug Collectors of America), I can recall that Ford used plugs from several different suppliers before contracting with Chamption for use of the X plug in 1911. Earlu suppliers included C.A. Metzger, Mosler, Sta-Rite, Splitdorf and at least one other whose name escapes me at the moment. In my collection I have an early Mosler marked "Ford Motor Company" on one side of the nicklel plated base. It is also rumored that Ford experimented with making their own plugs at one time and Ive seen some crude attempts at making a one-piece (non separable) plug with big Ford in script on them.

The early Chamption X plugs were straight sided porcelain without the famous "brass hat" that was included on later plugs and on even today's reproductions of the Champion X. The ribbed/brass top insulator style of Champion X was introduced in 1915/16. Champion acquired the Jeffrey DeWitt Spark Plug Company to obtain the rights to mine the insulation material they used and also adopted their plug design at that time.

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While on the subject of plugs, I have a question. What shortcuts, if any, are acceptable? Obviously the plug has to fit the hole, but the original make and model of the plug for some cars may not be known. If a cad plug fits and works, can an owner "doctor" the plug with a kit that blackens the plating? If the owner uses a magic marker to make the cad look black, is that acceptable?

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My understanding is either using a kit to blacken the base or marker or paint is acceptable. I also believe the manufacturer name doesn't make a differance either as long as it is correct looking. If I'm wrong, hopefully someone will correct me.

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You have a good point on plugs that fit. If they are of the proper reach and heat range they will work, of course. I'm curious to know if the really old cars people have mentioned, like from the teens, only used just one brand of plug when they were built. I doubt if complete records exist that are accessable for anyone to know. Since mass auto production early on was not like the later years assembly lines I am curious if more than one brand was used as procured by purchasing departments of early manufacturers.

Erm.gif

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

With Hershey right around the corner I thought it might be a good time to bring this thread back to the top. To help people who are bringing a car for the first time or people who have not shown a car in a while.

Additionally, please make note that if you have even ONE Halogen headlight judges MUST take a mandatory ten points off, even if the others are correct. This rule has not been changed yet.

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A key word is "DOCUMENTATION" if there is something that came on your car you must be able to show upon request proof that it was on there from the factory. I have several AACA Senior cars and there were times when I was asked to provide some type of proof as far as an item like for instance radial tires. My 73 Cadillac came with radial tires and the judges were unsure if a 73 would have had them. Lucky for me I happened to have the owners manual in the glove box that mentioned radial tires in it so I was fine. So when your getting your car ready for a national meet always remember to bring "documentation".

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The number does not matter in AACA, the finish on the base of the plug does, gun blued on early cars, cad plated on later ones. </div></div>

I'm not clear on the timeframe you mean by your phrase "later ones". All the original-type AC-brand plugs I've seen in 50s/60s/70s GM cars use a blackened base, not cad plated. Because these plugs are so common, I am assuming they are universally recognized as correct on GM cars of this era?

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The first year for the Cadmium plated spark plugs was 1956. Before that the spark plug bases were dark like the AC plugs. If you are using Champion plugs (which are cadmium plated) in a pre '56 car, paint or black magic marker the bases to cover the silver color. The dark based plug are acceptable after '56 along with the cadmium plated ones.

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  • 2 months later...

When i restore a plug I find it works well to bead blast the plug then gun blue it as mentioned earlier. I have had a set in my 24 Star for ten years and they still look good. I like the guys who put modern plug wires on brass cars or use chrome instead of nickle. What is the proper route to go for mufflers. On my Star I took a modern muffler and fabricated a wrap to go around it so it looks original. On Durants the muffler was part of the "tublar backbone" of the frame.

Jan cool.gif

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  • 2 months later...
Guest imported_CarFreak

Another thing that I see that always catches my eye is using the wrong or mismatched type of screw, bolts, etc. When you have an opportunity to see several of the same type car such as 41 Cadillac all parked near each other. It is amazing how many have the wrong type (phillips) screws instead of the original flathead screw.

After you are all done with your car. Spend some time to walk around and look at it like you are a judge or spectator. Someone mentioned wax in the roof rail cracks - yep! that looks terrible. But what is worse is overspray paint on hardware, weatherstrip, etc. Maybe you have a car that is mostly original but someone repainted a panel such as a fender, etc. Clean off the overspray from the chrome, glass. Oh and don't forget the paint in the wheel wells. Clean it up!

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Carfreak, The issue of the rust/wax in the gutter rails was in my original post. Sometimes it just comes down to something that simple that looses someone that one critical point that they thought did not matter. Points off matter....every one of them. Unless of course that one point takes you from a 400 point car to a 399 point car. Then you can afford to lose one. grin.gif

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks Biggarmike!! laugh.gif

That is the very reason I started the thread, to point out where people might just be giving away points and how important ONE point can be. Why settle for a second place trophy when you can have a first place one to show off to your friends and family just by taking care of the small stuff. cool.gif

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  • 4 months later...

Not really a reply but just bumping this back to the top what with Hershey just around the corner.

Anyone else have advice for the new folks here that might be coming to their first AACA show about how to keep points from being deducted? I feel it is as much a judge's job to educate the owners as it is to judge the cars. And if we can do that in advance of a show then we will have happier owners with more trophies. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" />

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  • 4 months later...

Right after hershey last year there was a lot of discousion about the judging of a 64 1/2 mustang. Anyone know if any changes or corections where made?? In one of the pictures it looked like owner had after market floor mats, I wonder if they where after market and if so did he take them out for judging?? Just wondered. Think spring,and think Binghamton ny spring nat. meet. Dick <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/cool.gif" alt="" />

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  • 1 month later...

What a great thing to hear. <img src="http://forums.aaca.org/images/graemlins/laugh.gif" alt="" /> It was why I started this thread in the first place, to help people really think about that one little point that might keep them out of the winner's circle. And to have others add their input to help people think about where that point might be and how to not give it away.

Congratulations to you on your award. Can you share a photo of your winning car?

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I have a question regarding license plates. I heard from someone that the AACA deducts points for having a license plate in the front, even if it is an official government issued plate. I believe some states required plates both front and back. My question is in relation to my 1957 Cadillac

thank you

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Not aware of any deduction for a front license plate, but here's what the judges manual has to say about non-authentic frames and badges.

4. BADGE DISPLAY

a. Badges and license plate frames with club names other than AACA will NOT

be subject to a deduction for authenticity, if they are appropriate to the

vehicle and displayed in good taste. They will be judged for condition.

b. Excessive display of club badges will result in a total deduction of not more

than two points.

c. Non-authentic license plate frames and advertising badges are not acceptable, regardless of the number or manner in which they are displayed.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">c. Non-authentic license plate frames and advertising badges are not acceptable, regardless of the number or manner in which they are displayed. </div></div>

In additon to this you would want to make sure that the front and back plate match (state and year) if have a front and back plate. Otherwise the front plate would be considered a non-authentic plate.

Also, if someone normally has a regular plate on the back but one on the front with the name of the owners, etc and a frame around it...take them off for AACA shows. The deduction for that is one point for the plate and one for the frame if the frame was not from the factory. As this thread states little things can cost you and one point can make the difference in the award you get or even knock you out of getting anything.

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